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Old 04-20-05, 12:18 PM   #1
halocon
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wheel truing without truing stand

both my front and rear wheels need to be trued since they are rubbing. is there any way to true the wheels without a truing stand? i've been told to use the brakes as an indicator. wherever the rim rubs agains the brake pad is the place to adjust. is this a good method? or should i just run out for a truing stand? and does anyone know how much performance bike charges for a wheel true? thx.
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Old 04-20-05, 12:22 PM   #2
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Use the brakes for a quick fix and buy a stand or take the wheels to the LBS for a correct fix.

Enjoy

Last edited by powers2b; 04-20-05 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 04-20-05, 12:22 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halocon
both my front and rear wheels need to be trued since they are rubbing. is there any way to true the wheels without a truing stand? i've been told to use the brakes as an indicator. wherever the rim rubs agains the brake pad is the place to adjust. is this a good method? or should i just run out for a truing stand? and does anyone know how much performance bike charges for a wheel true? thx.

I've done it the brake rubbing way and it does work in a sort of "quick and dirty" way, but don't expect miracles. Probably good enough, at least for my humble needs.
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Old 04-20-05, 12:29 PM   #4
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You can get by without a truing stand if you're careful. Try this . . . and get it as good as you can. Move the brake pads closer and closer to the rim as you get the rim truer and truer. You should be able to do a fine job.

http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/howfix_truing.shtml
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Old 04-20-05, 12:49 PM   #5
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cool, thx. i'll give that a try.
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Old 04-20-05, 02:28 PM   #6
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heres what i do, it may not be the best, but it works for me. i just put my bike up on a stand and spin the wheel. Then i take a marker and hold it steady against the break so it doesn't move and move it in closer until it barely touches the rim. Then find the mark on the rim and tighten the spokes along it that go to the opposite side of the hub, and loosen the ones on the side you marked. And then whip off the mark and repeat until it looks true.
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Old 04-20-05, 03:06 PM   #7
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Zip ties.
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Old 04-20-05, 03:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dooley
Zip ties.
And in case that provides nowhere near enough information . . . what this gentleman means is that zip-ties can be used in much the same way as you're using your brakes: to provide a measure of how far off true, and where, your rims are.

Look here: http://www.bicycling.com/article/0,3...ategory_id=365

Again . . . good luck!
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Old 04-22-05, 10:02 PM   #9
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hey how about use some chalk... that's what my grandpa used to do when I was younger... use some chalk against the fork at exact distance, shows you the places where the wheel is off...

you have to wash it afterwards though... not really...
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Old 04-22-05, 10:34 PM   #10
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I used to use two binder clips on a ruler. center that on the forks or near the brakes at the rear. secure with clamps or tape and flip the silver squeezy part down toward the rim. I would take the tubes and tires out when I did this type of truing. You can move the binder clips in toward the rim as it becomes more straight. You can also use this method on one of those rear wheel trainers.

If this isn't clear I can set one up and take a photo of it. It really does work quite nicely.
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Old 04-22-05, 11:23 PM   #11
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I sometimes find it easier to mark the rim with a marker (or "texta"), and for some reason, dark blue works best.
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Old 04-22-05, 11:30 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MakeTeaNotwar
Then i take a marker and hold it steady against the break so it doesn't move and move it in closer until it barely touches the rim.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 531Aussie
I sometimes find it easier to mark the rim with a marker (or "texta"), and for some reason, dark blue works best.
From my pre-truing stand days- since you mention markers, a lot of experimentation tells me that a few different china markers are best. You can get by with one color, but it's nice to have your first pass in yellow, second in, say, red, third, (if you need it) maybe blue. Always worked fantastic for me, and the china marker material has no negative effect on braking, it just powders/flakes off once it's under friction.
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Old 04-22-05, 11:33 PM   #13
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Yeah, I could never get chalk to work. There must be a "perfect" type of marker to use on rims.
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Old 04-23-05, 01:24 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moochers_Dad
I used to use two binder clips on a ruler. center that on the forks or near the brakes at the rear. secure with clamps or tape and flip the silver squeezy part down toward the rim. I would take the tubes and tires out when I did this type of truing. You can move the binder clips in toward the rim as it becomes more straight. You can also use this method on one of those rear wheel trainers.

If this isn't clear I can set one up and take a photo of it. It really does work quite nicely.

that would be really helpful if you can get some pics please.
i have a bunch of those clips laying around the house
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Old 04-23-05, 08:31 AM   #15
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I use the brake calipers as well. Just make sure they're centered first otherwise you'll be warping the wheel by trying to true it.
I use the barrel adjusters to take up cable slack and pull the pads in more and more, which ever side touches, I pull that way a bit then pull in the pads a little bit more. Till they're within 1/2 mm or so and I call it a day.
My commuter has disc brakes now so I use the depth measurement on a pair of calipers and work off of the frame for a reference, you can also use a ruler.
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Old 04-23-05, 10:09 AM   #16
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As I mentioned in the other thread I use an old Schwinn frame that I cold set to 130mm to accomodate the newer rear hub width of the larger cassettes. Because the weather is too frightful to ride today, I am truing my wheel as I write this. I too use the zip tie method to assess lateral run out. It works well. The brake caliper method works fine but I believe visually its easier with a zip tie. My new Campy Vento rear wheel had a lateral runout of a full 2mm and I have dialed it in to less than .5mm which is pretty good. A pro with the right tools can do better. What I do is label each spoke I adjust and make a written log and snap a pic of which spokes I adjust for posterity in the event the wheel goes out of true more or in a different spot. That way I can always restore the orginal spoke tensions. Typically as the article points out...loosening versus tightening is best to move the rim initially. Finger plucking also works well for a tightness reference. It is always gratifying when the pitch of a spoke agrees with how the wheel is out of true but this isn't always the case as most know. All you really need is a spoke wrench, an old frame...or your bike...I prefer an old frame...and a marker...but...no question having all the right tools is not only easier but creates a better end result. Remember to stress relieve your spokes with your hands and then check finish true before you are all done.
Good Luck,
George

Last edited by biker7; 04-23-05 at 10:18 AM.
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Old 04-23-05, 10:48 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriO
that would be really helpful if you can get some pics please.
i have a bunch of those clips laying around the house
I needed to change my rear tube and install a new Tektro Yoke today so setting this up makes me actually do it.

But after setting it up I realize have only used this method on bicycles with cantilever bosses.

It's just the way trued wheels when I was in grade school. Last year, before I got a truing stand I used this method on a cheap rear-wheel trainer I found. I use that trainer for sizing and testing changes to the bike in the winter; but it works for truing using this method.

I line up the "10" to the center of the wheel and move the clips in as necessary. It's not for ultra precision wheel truing, but it is enough so that I can adjust the brake pads closer to the rims for safety.
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Old 04-23-05, 11:03 AM   #18
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Personally I use a spoke lashed to the fork blade or seat stays with an old toe strap or ankle strap. Put an L-shaped bend in it and then at the very end (where it touches the rim) put a full 180 degree bend in there so that it his the rim with the elbo of the bend instead of the sharp jagged end.

Slide it up and put it over the rim to check for radial true. Here's a little diagram of what I'm talking about.
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Old 04-24-05, 06:58 PM   #19
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Brake pads and a tiny screwdriver are good tools to see how far off the wheel is. I have built a few wheels using the bicycle as a truing stand and it works very well.

So why do they sell truing stands? To save time.
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Old 04-24-05, 07:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moochers_Dad
I needed to change my rear tube and install a new Tektro Yoke today so setting this up makes me actually do it.

But after setting it up I realize have only used this method on bicycles with cantilever bosses.

It's just the way trued wheels when I was in grade school. Last year, before I got a truing stand I used this method on a cheap rear-wheel trainer I found. I use that trainer for sizing and testing changes to the bike in the winter; but it works for truing using this method.

I line up the "10" to the center of the wheel and move the clips in as necessary. It's not for ultra precision wheel truing, but it is enough so that I can adjust the brake pads closer to the rims for safety.
Wow thats a clever idea. Good thinking
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Old 04-25-05, 12:02 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel Gagnon

So why do they sell truing stands? To save time.
I can put my truing stand on my coffee table and watch TV. It's a little harder, and more greasy to do that with my whole bike
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Old 04-29-05, 12:19 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0502
And in case that provides nowhere near enough information . . . what this gentleman means is that zip-ties can be used in much the same way as you're using your brakes: to provide a measure of how far off true, and where, your rims are.

Look here: http://www.bicycling.com/article/0,3...ategory_id=365

Again . . . good luck!
how can i make sure that my brakes are centered?
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