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  1. #1
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    How to service brakes your self?

    .......And get them really responsive for a Standard v-brake ?

    thanks

  2. #2
    POWERCRANK addict markhr's Avatar
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    shameless POWERCRANK plug
    Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
    Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
    Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Cartridge type refills are worth the money. That way you don't have to change the setttings just the pads.

    Other than that the screw at the side of each brake centres the pads. If pad is too close tighten, too lose untighten.

    Koolmax pads are worth the extra money

    Park reference site very good to learn

    Happy adjusting

    Brian

  4. #4
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    V-Brakes are MUCH simpler to set up and adjust than canti's. The downside-they don't last nearly as long.

    Make sure, if you're replacing the pad assembly, to take note of the position and number of washers, spacers, and so forth. Put em' back the same way, and all should be well.

  5. #5
    I ride a REAL Schwinn!
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    It's going to depend on the quality of the V-brakes and condition of the pads/your rim, but you will most likely want to play with the amount of cable you pull through the pinch bolt before tightening and the tension screw on each arm. The websites linked to above will help you out with that. Some levers also offer adjustments, so you might want to check that. Lastly, keeping the cables and housings lubed and changed on a regular schedule will make the cable movement feel smoother.

    -Moab
    '00 Schwinn Moab 3 - XTR/XT/Thomson/Rhyno Lites/Skareb Super
    Lemond Nevada City - Almost Stock!

  6. #6
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikewer
    The downside-they don't last nearly as long.
    What doesn't the brakes themselves? If that's what you're saying then try again. The pads may wear out a bit faster, but then again old canti blocks aren't exactly a good thing either

  7. #7
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by james76
    .......And get them really responsive for a Standard v-brake ?

    thanks
    I'm with moabrider on this one. Exactly what kind of brake do you have? I like Avids best and even the low end Shimano's can usually be adjusted pretty easily (I'm not overly impressed by the ones with the parallel push mechanism). Tectros are so-so at best. ProMax just plain suck. As a general rule, you won't be able to get crummy brakes work as well as good ones.

  8. #8
    Year-round cyclist
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    I have two bikes with the original v-brake in front and a canti behind. I installed the canti because the v-brake interfered with rack struts. My canti is set with proper cable pull so that it feels exactly like the v-brake. Setup took some time and I had to Read Sheldon a few times, but that proves it can work.

    Regarding v-brake pads and pads in general: for all-weather cycling, get Kool Stop Salmon or Dual pads. And for v-brakes, unless you have a tight space around the fork, get the BMX pads rather than the Thinline pads. They have exactly the same thread design, are as efficient in snow, cost the same... but are 2-3 times thicker, so they last much longer.

    Riding with kids in tow, I kept my original Avid brake pads for less than a month. The Kool Stop thinline Salmon pads lasted almost a year. And now, I have the same BMX pads for roughly 3 years, and they still have some life left. (All that wear is on the most-used front brake, by the way.)
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  9. #9
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    hehe- I meant the pads, of course. Those rock-hard old canti pads seem to go on forever. We've got department bikes that are 7-8 years old with the original brakes!

    Given the ease of replacement, even with non-cartridge jobs, V-brakes are the way to go.

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