Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Senior Member Surferbruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Aveyron France
    Posts
    5,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    ti seatpost in steel frame?

    anything to watch out for using a ti seatpost in a steel frame? i recall hearing something about galvanic corrosion but i can't remember which materials don't mate well.
    if i use an anti seize compound is it o.k. for ti/steel?

  2. #2
    Senior Member mtbikerinpa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    PA
    My Bikes
    92 Giant Sedona ATX Custom
    Posts
    1,672
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There will always be some corrosion with any dissimilar metals. Ti and steel are less affected than ti and aluminum or even ti and carbon. In any combination, I am a firm believer in a heavy coat of car wax on the post before use. Some grease, but wax will not attract dirt or turn nasty in muck.
    Aviation Mechanic, Bike racer, Fitness Equipment Restorer

    http://pedalmybike.com/userTrackies/myTrackie4758.jpg[/url]

  3. #3
    Hellbender
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    Gt fueler, Schwinn pro stok 3, And crapy wallmart next bike
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would say if you keep the bike out of the rain it shall be fine! And if it doese get gunk clean it lol.

  4. #4
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Surferbruce
    anything to watch out for using a ti seatpost in a steel frame? i recall hearing something about galvanic corrosion but i can't remember which materials don't mate well.
    if i use an anti seize compound is it o.k. for ti/steel?
    Grease always worked for me. Antiseize or Ti prep will work but it's nasty stuff it it gets on stuff you don't want it on.

  5. #5
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbikerinpa
    Some grease, but wax will not attract dirt or turn nasty in muck.
    Does it really matter if it's in the seattube?

  6. #6
    B-b-b-b-b-b-bicicle Rider orange leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Northfield, MN
    My Bikes
    1997, stumpjumper S-works hardtail, Medici, Giant allegre (track dropouts and fixed gear), Columbia twosome, schwinn twinn, '67 raleigh 5 speed internal hub, Old triumph 3 speed, old BSA 3-speed, schwinn Racer 2spd kickback, Broken raysport criteriu
    Posts
    739
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Surferbruce
    anything to watch out for using a ti seatpost in a steel frame? i recall hearing something about galvanic corrosion but i can't remember which materials don't mate well.
    if i use an anti seize compound is it o.k. for ti/steel?
    Yeah,
    Anti-seize works great. There's a decent shop here in Milwaukee that uses nothing but antiseize on all it's seatposts, bottom brackets, anywhere there's not actually moving parts (bearings) but anywhere things are clamped or threaded together.
    It's made specifically to prevent metals from "cold welding" together, which as you fairly accurately put it is actually corroding together of unlike metals.
    Rubberside down.
    Rudimentum mendum menda
    Iudicium mendiosus
    Judicium per erratum
    Judicium et erratum!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Surferbruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Aveyron France
    Posts
    5,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    cool deal thanks folks!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    While you're at it, have a shop deburr and "flex-hone" your seat tube to remove any corrosion that's already started in the seat tube. That way you don't mar your nice new post. Doing this and using anti-seize will keep corrosion at a minimum. But don't forget to pull the seatpost out occasionally to check for problems (annually or bi-annually). How often depends on conditions, mainly how much water your bike's exposed to.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •