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  1. #1
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    Cleaning Rear Cogs

    Hi.
    I want to clean my rear cogs. I removed the cogs from the hub, I have a lockring type hub. I was thinking of removing the cogs, seperating them, then cleanning them of with some degreaser.

    Anyway when I tried to seperate the cogs, biggest four would not seperate. I think there are three pins running through them. I haven't seen anyone mention anything about that. Is there a special tool that can be used?
    Also a question about reassembling, what exactly do I need to regrease/reoil? I'm assuming I need to put some grease on the freehub. I bought a tri-flow synthetic grease for that. Do I need to oil the cogs themselves? If yes will WD-40 do the trick, because I don't think WhiteLightning I use on my chain will be good for re-oiling the cogs.
    Thanks.
    I see hills.... Bring them on!!!
    Stay calm and bring a towel.

  2. #2
    sch
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    It is standard practice to attach the larger cogs together (rivetting). They are not supposed to be taken apart. Park makes a brush for cleaning rings. No particular lube is needed in reassembly, just lube the chain. Lube just collects even more dirt and junk. Reassemble dry. WD40 is not a lube but it can be used to help dry the chain if you clean with water based solvents. Repeat WD40 is not a lube.
    Steve

  3. #3
    here
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    This article explains greasing the freewheel before reinstalling the cassette.
    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml

    Many newer mtb cassettes have the four largest cogs permanently attached to metal arms called a spider. You can't remove them, but this thread covers how to clean the cogs in place.
    Best way to clean cogs?

    The cogs should be kept clean but not lubricated. They have no moving parts so lubricant would just be an adhesive for grime.

  4. #4
    We drive on the left. Dutchy's Avatar
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    I normally remove the cassette and soak it in a bowl of liquid de-greaser for 5 minutes. I then use a toothbrush to get the grime out. Then dry the cassette with a cloth and bolt it back on. Very effective and quick. Of course chainrings and chains can also be done this way. Just remember to re-lube the chain.

    CHEERS.

    Mark
    I'd rather be riding.

  5. #5
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by solo
    This article explains greasing the freewheel before reinstalling the cassette.
    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml

    Many newer mtb cassettes have the four largest cogs permanently attached to metal arms called a spider. You can't remove them, but this thread covers how to clean the cogs in place.
    Best way to clean cogs?

    The cogs should be kept clean but not lubricated. They have no moving parts so lubricant would just be an adhesive for grime.
    I guess I should have mentioned I have a Road bike. I guess they do something similar with cogs for them too.
    Park instructions say "Lubricate heavily with grease or anti-seize inside mounting threads of freewheel."
    I'm not up on all the names are they talking about a rear cog cluster?
    Last edited by UmneyDurak; 05-23-05 at 11:49 PM.
    I see hills.... Bring them on!!!
    Stay calm and bring a towel.

  6. #6
    Elite Rep
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    I've seen them 'cog cleaning' tools in a bike shop. Just a long thin brush, but personally not worth the $$. I still use the good old tooth brush for all of that stuff. I remove the cog intact, and then with soap and water and a brush give it a scrub down. That usually gets all the grime off. But if you want your cog to look like new again, I recommend soaking in some degreaser for about 5 - 10min.

    I actually see no point to cleaning the rear cogs besides the fact that the chain might run that extra bit smoother and it makes the cog look newer and cleaner...

  7. #7
    Just Ride
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    I couldn't be stuffed cleaning mine, unless its really bad with dirt everywhere on it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member matheprat's Avatar
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    The group of cogs which are rivited together can be separated easilly. Just file down one end of each of the 3 rivets, and then get a hammer and nail and gently tap them out. You'll then be able to clean the individual cogs and spacers, and re-assemble them all. I'm not sure why they are rivited together in the first place, they work just as well separate as together.

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    Elite Rep
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    So with the cleaning part, you would just use degreaser?

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    Senior Member matheprat's Avatar
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    If you want. I just spray on some GT85, and rub it off with an old cloth.

  11. #11
    No one carries the DogBoy
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    Why even remove the cogs from the wheel? I just use a rag and "floss" the cogs. This gets them looking shiny and like new.

  12. #12
    sch
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    UmneyDurak: (russian nickname?) The reference to FREEWHEEL is the clue, freewheels have been obsolete for 12-15yrs though there are many bikes around that use them. Cassettes are collections of cogs that have splined interiors and no moving parts. The female splined cassette slides onto the male splined rear free hub. The ratchetted pawl mechanism that allows either type to freewheel in reverse or drive the bike forward in standard pedalling is inside the splined section of the hub on newer bikes but inside the freewheel on older bikes. The freewheel screwed onto the hub
    with a R hand thread. Getting them off required a chain whip or cog wrench to lock the freewheel in place and allow it to be unscrewed. The threads did need to be lubed. That is not the case with cassettes however.
    Steve

  13. #13
    Senior Member nick burns's Avatar
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    Thin cone wrench wrapped in a rag works for me.

    Don't need no stinking de-greaser.

  14. #14
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    I floss my cogs with string of the appropriate thickness. Doesn't get snagged the way a rag does.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Avalanche325's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue_neon
    I've seen them 'cog cleaning' tools in a bike shop. Just a long thin brush, but personally not worth the $$. I still use the good old tooth brush for all of that stuff. I remove the cog intact, and then with soap and water and a brush give it a scrub down. That usually gets all the grime off. But if you want your cog to look like new again, I recommend soaking in some degreaser for about 5 - 10min.
    Those cog cleaning brushes have very stiff bristles that reach all the way to the core of the cassette. You can't reach all the way in there on the big cogs with a toothbrush. With a cog brush you can also leave the cassette on the bike and clean it in about three minutes. That's worth $4 to me.


    Quote Originally Posted by blue_neon
    I actually see no point to cleaning the rear cogs besides the fact that the chain might run that extra bit smoother and it makes the cog look newer and cleaner...
    Well, what are you supposed to say to that?

  16. #16
    Elite Rep
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avalanche325
    Those cog cleaning brushes have very stiff bristles that reach all the way to the core of the cassette. You can't reach all the way in there on the big cogs with a toothbrush. With a cog brush you can also leave the cassette on the bike and clean it in about three minutes. That's worth $4 to me.
    $4, well you must be getting them cheap or my bike shops are rip offs! I only use the tooth brush for a clean around the area where the chain goes... I do however have some bigger brushes that would fit all the way in. I say the best method is taking the Cog Set off alltogether and soaking it and cleaning it OFF the bike. Then after every couple of rides use a 'cog brush' or tooth brush and give ita quick wipe over.

    My cog set is at the point where it is so grimy a cog brush will not get it clean.

    Quote Originally Posted by Avalanche325
    Well, what are you supposed to say to that?
    Nothing

  17. #17
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogBoy
    Why even remove the cogs from the wheel? I just use a rag and "floss" the cogs. This gets them looking shiny and like new.
    This is the best way there is no reason to take anything apart. get a rag and rip it into about 1" wide strips to save on rags. feed one edge into the space between the cogs and go back and forth. the ratchet in the hub or freewheel will slowly rotate the cogs around until they are all done. With practice you can do this on the chainrings. I can do the rear cogs in about 5 minutes if I take my time. Spin the pedals backwards and grab the chain with a rag for cleaning the chain. While spining touch the rag to the derailleur pulleys too. If I ever get any problems from my chain or cogs with 7500 miles on them I'll let you know. Same for the set with 6000 mile and the set with 5000 miles.

  18. #18
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UmneyDurak
    I guess I should have mentioned I have a Road bike. I guess they do something similar with cogs for them too.
    Park instructions say "Lubricate heavily with grease or anti-seize inside mounting threads of freewheel."
    I'm not up on all the names are they talking about a rear cog cluster?
    This does not have anything to do with grease on cogs. Don't grease the cogs. If your bike even has this it is not something you can see.

  19. #19
    Frosted Flake
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    When they say the grease or never-seize the inner mounting threads, I believe they are referring to the threads to mount the freewheel to the hub, I suspect this is not a cassette type hub.
    It's either old age or I need more suspension...

    04 Kona Blast (mine)
    05 Trek 4500 (hers)

  20. #20
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies. Took of the rear cogs, soaked them in Simple Green for a few minutes and used an old toothbrush to clean them. Put everything back the way I found it. Also did the same with the chain. That SRAM link rocks. They look very shiny now. Used White Lightning on the chain and triflow on those pulleys that chain runs through.
    I have a question about the spacers that go between cogs, does it really matter which way they go? I looked at them closesly and couldn't tell any difference between sides.

    P.S. I think someone was wondering about my nickname, yes it is in russian.
    I see hills.... Bring them on!!!
    Stay calm and bring a towel.

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