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  1. #1
    vegan powered
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    changing a tire suposed to be this hard?

    So ive had my Specialized Sirrus for about 5 months now and had to fix about 4 flats. It is taking me about 20 minutes to take the tire off and put it back on with a new tube. I dont seem to be getting any faster and I just got an armadillo tire (700x28) and it was so hard to get on I broke a tire lever trying.

    I used to be able to do my mountain bike tires in less than 10 minutes but these road tires are really pissing me off! Is there some secret that I dont understand or is this just how it goes?

  2. #2
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    well sometimes it has to do with the rims, some have high sidewalls. I hear that certain ones such as Rhyno lites are difficult to change tires with. Try installing another a tire on another rim besides your own, if you still have difficulty i would look at your technique
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  3. #3
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee-vee
    So ive had my Specialized Sirrus for about 5 months now and had to fix about 4 flats. It is taking me about 20 minutes to take the tire off and put it back on with a new tube. I dont seem to be getting any faster and I just got an armadillo tire (700x28) and it was so hard to get on I broke a tire lever trying.

    I used to be able to do my mountain bike tires in less than 10 minutes but these road tires are really pissing me off! Is there some secret that I dont understand or is this just how it goes?

    Go to your LBS (a busy one) on a Saturday and watch them change tires/tubes. With a little experience you should be able to remove a tire in about 30 seconds. Installation should not take much more.

    The notable exception is folding tires, especially high-pressure. The bead material tends to stretch with use so they are a bit undersize and a real bear to install first time.
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  4. #4
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmfnla
    Go to your LBS (a busy one) on a Saturday and watch them change tires/tubes. With a little experience you should be able to remove a tire in about 30 seconds. Installation should not take much more.
    Good luck if one has a particularly difficult tire rim combination. Some rims are nearly impossible no matter what tire.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Stubacca's Avatar
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    My 700x28 Armadillos are a bear to install. With tire levers they're not any worse than any other tire to remove. Fortunately I only have to do this once a year. Around Nov/Dec I remove them to install the knobbies, and in March/April I put them back on. Haven't ever had a puncture with the armadillos in about the 2000 miles I've been using them.

    Try not to use tire levers to install the tire - much higher risk of puncturing or pinching the tube. Keep the beads of the tire in the center of the rim while you're installing it - the center is lower than the sides, so gives you a little bit more room to install the last difficult bit.

  6. #6
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    Good luck if one has a particularly difficult tire rim combination. Some rims are nearly impossible no matter what tire.
    True enough. Soapy water is an old trick that sometimes helps, but you don't want to get it on braking surfaces.
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  7. #7
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomcow2
    I hear that certain ones such as Rhyno lites are difficult to change tires with.
    Not for me they aren't. Armadillo's have a stiffer sidewall an that can lead to a slightly longer install time especially for a novice

  8. #8
    vegan powered
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    Well I think it must be my rims then. They are Alex DA-16. I also took a few chunks out of the bead on the tire trying to get the dam things on.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Rhynolites are easy. I have trouble with Kevlar bead/Mavic rims. Raiyn, have you used that Park Tool tires wrench? The big one that goes over the axle?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Try this:

    1. Break the tire bead away from the rim all of the way around the tire on both sides.
    2. Stand the tire on the ground or floor in front of you with the valve at 3:00.
    3. Starting at the top, squeeze both beads into the center of the rim on both sides.
    4. While maintaining downward pressure on the tire, use your hands to slide gradually down both sides of the tire. What you are trying to do is to accumulate all of the slack at the bottom.
    5. Most times by doing this I can remove the tire without using any tools. If necessary I use a tire lever or, in a pinch, a quick release lever to get it started.

    Good luck.

  11. #11
    slower than you Applehead57's Avatar
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    I too have noticed that tires sometimes take alot of effort to remove/install on the rim.
    Very tight tolerances, I know I'm putting way too much force on the tire levers.
    I read on this forum that one way around it was to put the tire in the clothes dryer for a few minutes, the idea being to warm it up (expand slightly) in hopes that it will go on easier.

    Very few times have I been able to remove & install a tire without tire levers.
    "Lack of opportunity does not constitute virtue". Diana Tickle.

  12. #12
    Senior Member lokerola's Avatar
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    My Specialized Allez Comp Cromo tires are PAIN in the @@s to change too. I thought I was going to bend a rim struggling to get the tire back on. I'm running the stock Specialized tubes and Specialized Pro race tires. It took me about 20mins to get the tire back on. I've heard a lot of Specialized tires are a pain to get on and off. FWIW, the wheels are stock Shimano R540s. I really like the whole wheel/tire/tube combo, they're fast and hold air better than any other tire I've run, but I dread the next flat.
    Our Lady of Blessed Acceleration, don't fail me now.





  13. #13
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    I used to have a heck of time getting some tires off my rims. Sometimes, if it was warm out I would put them in the trunk of the car, let the rubber heat up, and that certainly helped.

    Mostly a good tire lever is very helpful, check this one out worth every penny and you only need this one tool. As soon as you are able to pry the tire up push forward real hard and it will slide the tire over the rim lip.

    http://www.rei.com/product/1647.htm?...HP_CYCLING_TOC

  14. #14
    Ogr8nwmypstmksnosnse pgoat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee-vee
    So ive had my Specialized Sirrus for about 5 months now and had to fix about 4 flats. It is taking me about 20 minutes to take the tire off and put it back on with a new tube. I dont seem to be getting any faster and I just got an armadillo tire (700x28) and it was so hard to get on I broke a tire lever trying.

    I used to be able to do my mountain bike tires in less than 10 minutes but these road tires are really pissing me off! Is there some secret that I dont understand or is this just how it goes?

    It's not you. I always had a much easier time with mtb tires. Those armadillos are VERY tough to change! You need lotsa elbow grease and fingers of steel.

    If you can look for folding tires next time; I have found they are just a hair easier to install, especially once they break in a bit.

  15. #15
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
    Try this:

    1. Break the tire bead away from the rim all of the way around the tire on both sides.
    2. Stand the tire on the ground or floor in front of you with the valve at 3:00.
    3. Starting at the top, squeeze both beads into the center of the rim on both sides.
    4. While maintaining downward pressure on the tire, use your hands to slide gradually down both sides of the tire. What you are trying to do is to accumulate all of the slack at the bottom.
    5. Most times by doing this I can remove the tire without using any tools. If necessary I use a tire lever or, in a pinch, a quick release lever to get it started.

    Good luck.
    Why does he have to wait until 3:00..?
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  16. #16
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmfnla
    Why does he have to wait until 3:00..?
    He can do it at any time of day he wants. In your case, however, it's important to wait until 3:00 AM. Otherwise my curse on you will result continual flat tires. Now aren't you glad that you brought it up?

  17. #17
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
    He can do it at any time of day he wants. In your case, however, it's important to wait until 3:00 AM. Otherwise my curse on you will result continual flat tires. Now aren't you glad that you brought it up?
    What would we do without you senior members..?
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  18. #18
    Senior Member midgie's Avatar
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    Armadillo Tires are always a b!tch. Even harder if you've got velox on the rim. Good thing about the armadillos, once you get them on you'll have less flats. So you shouldn't have to do it again for awhile.
    We're gonna have the hap, hap, happiest Christmas since Bing Crosby tap-danced with Danny ****ing Kaye.~Clark Griswold

  19. #19
    Senior Member G4teamG's Avatar
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    I concur, Specialized tires are a pain to remove. I took off my Enduros and replaced them with Nimbus EX (Great move). I guess some tire makers are known for making some tires tough to remove. My old WTB Primal Raptors were a piece of cake. Anyways, good luck and use the best technique possible.

  20. #20
    OlyCommuter babaluey's Avatar
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    d-v I have the same bike, same rims and same Armadillo tires as you. They are very stiff and getting the last bit onto the rim is tough. When I get down to the last 8 - 10 inches of bead, I just put a tire lever in the center of the exposed length and give it a good twist to pop it in (careful not to pinch the tube!). I've had to do this four times - when I put the Armadillos on new, shortly thereafter when my front tube exploded due to pinching, and last week when I repaired a flat on the rear tire. Yes, you can get a flat with a 'dillo- bit of glass.

    The soapy water is probably also a good idea. I know auto tire shops keep a bucket of soap solution at each tire changing station.

  21. #21
    2-Cyl, 1/2 HP @ 90 RPM slvoid's Avatar
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    Let all the air out of the tire.
    Use your thumb to push the tire away from the rim, slide a tire lever under the bead of the tire to lift it and pry it off away from the rim.
    Now, with the tire lever in there, put the little hook on the other end of the lever around a spoke and use that as leverage to slowly peel the tire away from the rim.
    Once the tire is off, you're ready to put a new tire on.
    Put the tire on so that one side is completely on the rim with the tube inside it, inflate the tube a tiny amount so that it holds its shape (so you don't pinch flat it).
    Seat the other side of the tire onto the rim starting where the valve for the tube is by hand. Continue pressing the tire bead onto the rim with your thumbs or palm and seating it by hand all the way around.
    The last 10 inches or so is especially hard. At this point, let the air out of the tube and use your palm to push the tire and bead as hard as you can towards the rim to seat it.
    Practice practice practice.

    I've put on 4 sets of armadillo's now, sizes 26x1.5, 700x23, and 700x35, and 24x2.1. All of which I can now remove in about a minute and reinstall w/o tire levers in about 2 minutes.

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