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Old 05-27-05, 04:26 AM   #1
phantomcow2
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HOw thick of tubing should a good seatpost be?

Im just wondering, on a good seatpost how thick should the tubing be. Assuming this is aluminum
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Old 05-27-05, 05:55 AM   #2
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also concerned about seat post fatigue - when to replace? My alloy post has some score lines - anything to worry about?
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Old 05-27-05, 03:34 PM   #3
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The thickness of the tubing is dependent on what sort of alloy is used. Think, cheap tubing is not as strong, so it'll be thicker to achieve the same strength. High-end stems (and frames...) use top-level alloys and can be made thinner as a result.

You can figure that no manufacturer is going to sell a stem that's likely to fail, and thus be the source of an expensive lawsuit.

Most of my bike officers are big, heavy guys who wear a lot of heavy equipment as well. I've never seen a broken seatpost.
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Old 05-28-05, 12:00 AM   #4
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You can figure that no manufacturer is going to sell a stem that's likely to fail, and thus be the source of an expensive lawsuit.


In theory you are correct but companies that make ultra light parts for racing have a different application than everyday utilitarian parts, even those made of alloy. Point being, just cause it's light and thin and expensive doesn't mean you can bash it for years and expect it to be safe. I am talking super weight weenie Ti parts or even aluminum bars and such.
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