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  1. #1
    Newbie erhan's Avatar
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    Choosing dic brake pads

    I have Avid BB7 disc brakes and I need to change the front pads. There are several after market brake pad compounds like organic, metalic, resin, sintered, etc., but I don't know which one would be right for my riding style.

    I have a light weight xc hardtail, and I am 156 lbs. I ride down steep hills quite often (yea, I do a lot of climbing), and usually I brake constantly to control the speed on loose terrain. I ride in all conditions, like hot, cold, mud, rain, dry, dust...

    I am actually quite happy with the lifetime of the original avid pads. The only thing I don't like is, when they get hot, it gets harder and harder to slow down. Actually, this is the reason why I want to learn about other pad compounds.

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mtbikerinpa's Avatar
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    Usually, they read like this.
    Organic;carbon:
    stock to most brands other than heavy duty. It offers good friction qualities for most riders.
    Sintered;metalic;bronze:
    Higher heat rating. Wears longer. Lower friction, resulting in less grab at light forces.

    In Aftermarket grades, they spec by another scale generally. I will use EBC as an example.
    Green:
    Kevlar based. Good for most applications. Wear reistant, but good low-effor grip.
    Red:
    High friction for maximum grip-effort applied. Downhill optimized. Less pad life.
    Gold:
    Sintered metalic. Higher friction. High wear reistance at the price of higher rotor wear. Good for mud and gritty conditions.

    There are a lot more varieties and opininons on the matter, so these are just highlights. In general for xc and light dh, the resin on shimano's has been fine. I would personally look into green or red if I was to change compounds.
    Aviation Mechanic, Bike racer, Fitness Equipment Restorer

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