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  1. #1
    Indecisive rookie
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    Need help with brakes again

    Hey all, i installed a new tire, 2.5 inches wide, i went to use th brakes, but the pads were rubbng too much, like the wheel was barelymoving freely when riding.

    i adjusted the pads and the little spring tension, but the whoel Vbrake housing is slanted to the left, and if i went to use the brakes, the acyual brake arm that holds the pad would touch and rub the tread of the tire.

    how do i adjust the housing to be straight, and the pads to have some space so they dont rub the rim when im not braking?

  2. #2
    Junior Member 29erRick's Avatar
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    remove the brakes from bike,middle hole ? there should be 3 , move out(dont remove) both spring screws,squeeze brakes to the rim with your hand ,look at clearance on both sides, you might have to move washers if they are xt v's ,you should be able to adjust to fit your tire, use the spring screws as your final adjustment, 29erRick,RIDE SAFE>

  3. #3
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    What kind of bike and what kind of brakes?

    2.5 tires won't fit on everything. Actually, 2.5 tires won't fit on very many bikes. Give me a little more information and I might be able to help you better without having to write a whole book.

  4. #4
    Indecisive rookie
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    Im riding a kona hahana, standard V brakes, i took some pics so heres a pic by pic description of my dillemma

    In this first pic, you can slightly see that the brake mechanims is slightly off center, and is tilting to the left.
    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y29...h/DSCN3943.jpg

    the brake pad on OUR left is rubbing against the rim and causes a lot of friction, the other pad on OUR right, has space between the rim and itself, therefore there is no friction, The wheel cannot move very well right now.

    This picture here shows that the brake pad on OUR left is touching, causing all the friction
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y29/aa...t=DSCN3945.jpg

    Now, after i adjust the tension springs on both sides, the brake housing is WAY off to the left, seen ehre

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y29...h/DSCN3943.jpg


    now, when it is adjusted like this, there is less friction,b ut it IS still there. now the next pic shows where the brake arm rubs aganist the tire tread if i use it.

    http://photobucket.com/albums/y29/aa...t=DSCN3947.jpg





    bike doers look sexy tho

    http://photobucket.com/albums/y29/aa...t=DSCN3949.jpg

  5. #5
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    OK, here's what I would try.

    1. Flip your front wheel around and see how it fits in the fork. I suspect it will be pretty well centered either way, but it's best to clear away the possibility of an improperly dished rim before messing with brake adjustments.

    2. Your brake pad came with a one narrow and one wide spacer. I think that with 2.5 tires you are going to want the wide spacer next to the rim.

    3. Make sure that your pads are properly adjusted relative to the rim.

    4. If your fork has more than 1 hole for the return spring, make sure it's in the same hole on both sides.

    5. At the base of each arm there is a small screw. Screwing in the screw on the side that is nearest the rim will move that arm farther away and, at the same time, move the other arm in closer. See if diddling with the screws on both sides will equalize the two arms.

    6. If that doesn't work. Buy yourself some medium priced Shimano brake arms. Deore, for examply should only cost about $20.00 per side and that's if you pay full retail. They're better than what you have now. Actually, if it were my bike, I think that I'd skip 1-5 and go right to 6.

  6. #6
    Senior Member juicemouse's Avatar
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    If step 5 in RG's post isn't enough to center your brake arms, go back to his step 4 (don't skip the other three important steps though). There's a reason some manufacturers have 3 holes for the return spring, and you just found that reason. Some cheap brakes don't even have an adjusting screw for spring tension, relying entirely on these three holes. Unscrew your brake arm from the frame and move the spring to a higher hole for more spring tension (to move the arm away from the rim) and to a lower hole for less spring tension (to move the arm closer to the rim). I'd start with less tension on what I think you're calling OUR left (as in, the right side of the bike as you're riding it and the left side of the pictures you posted, looking at the bike). If that isn't enough to center the arms, start putting more tension into the other side. Generally, less tension is preferred because it lessens the force you need to exert at the brake lever. Experiment till you find what works for your setup. Try not to get discouraged, as this could take a little while to get right.

    Your brakes aren't exactly top of the line or anything, but that doesn't mean they shouldn't work perfectly well either. See http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/...x.shtml#brakes for the whole story and some good pictures of brake adjustment. The "Linear-pull" section is most applicable to your brakes, but the "Cantilever" section has some pictures of the return spring adjustment I was talking about. If you still have questions, keep cool and ask the group again. I wouldn't go out and buy new brakes till I was sure there was something wrong with the ones I had.

  7. #7
    Junior Member 29erRick's Avatar
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    test

  8. #8
    Indecisive rookie
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    bah, if i just wanna get new brakes for the front, like new everythings, whats a good set to get? i was working on them today for like 4 hours and i figure once i get my new fork, im just gnna take it to LBS and let them do it for 10 bucks

  9. #9
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Back the heck up a minute guys. He changed a tire. That should have no effect on the brake. If if didn't rub the rim before, it shouldn't now. Make sure the ferrule is seated properly at the lever. You'd be surprised how many times that's overlooked. Next, try releasing tension on the non-rubbing side. Many times that allows some slack on the problematic side.

    Side note - I think I recall you asking about suspension. It appears your frame/fork combo was designed with the proper geometry so that a suspension for can be added later. I think it's called "Suspension corrected" or something similar. Anyone got any comments on that, or am I only more confused?

  10. #10
    Senior Member mtbikerinpa's Avatar
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    I have heard of this design effect before. They predict what fork travel/height you will be most likely using and plan accordingly.
    Aviation Mechanic, Bike racer, Fitness Equipment Restorer

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  11. #11
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Same rim, the pads will not be a problem. Tire fits...the rims the same distance....

  12. #12
    Member MarkD's Avatar
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    The cupped washer from what I can see is on the wrong way around too. Go to the Shimano website and download one of the exploded views of a brake arm to see what order and what way around all the bits go.

  13. #13
    Senior Member CATZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkD
    The cupped washer from what I can see is on the wrong way around too. Go to the Shimano website and download one of the exploded views of a brake arm to see what order and what way around all the bits go.
    I think MarkD is correct here!

    If the rounded portion of the washer doesn't fit into the cupped part of the spacer, the whole pad assembly will be too long (toward the wheel too far). This would account for the non-centered situation and rubbing on the other side of the tire. Plus, the toe adjustments won't be possible.

    My guess ... pad assembly was removed to insert tire between the brake arms. ?? Then re-assembled wrong. Compare both sides. (maybe both sides are assembled incorrectly)
    Last edited by CATZ; 05-29-05 at 07:12 AM.
    I wouldn't be overweight, if I was taller!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriate
    Back the heck up a minute guys. He changed a tire. That should have no effect on the brake. If if didn't rub the rim before, it shouldn't now.
    I disagree. The tire he installed is a 2.5 inch tire. Installing such a wide tire often affects other things on a bike.

  15. #15
    Indecisive rookie
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    Guys, i know you poured all your info to me, i was torquing the brake arm and i think my anger and force broke something, theres a small crack in a brake arm and i really dont know if its going to hold........ i read that retro you said get the shimano deores

    im thinking:

    im getting a new fork, should be here this coming friday, im also getting new pads, the jagwire switchback with red compound, but im going to try f or the shimano replacable compound pad inserts. Should i just get new brake arms, then put everything together , take it to the LBS who will do a good job of this for 15 bucks?

  16. #16
    Indecisive rookie
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    okay, now im pissed, i cant find a canadian retailer with the shimano brake pads, the ones that use replaceable inserts, ie the koolstop salmon pads.

    Im thinknig shimano deore arms, and using my levers and cables i already have.

    if anyone has any other ideas, lemme know.

  17. #17
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaron_simkovich
    Hey all, i installed a new tire, 2.5 inches wide, i went to use th brakes, but the pads were rubbng too much, like the wheel was barelymoving freely when riding.

    i adjusted the pads and the little spring tension, but the whoel Vbrake housing is slanted to the left, and if i went to use the brakes, the acyual brake arm that holds the pad would touch and rub the tread of the tire.

    how do i adjust the housing to be straight, and the pads to have some space so they dont rub the rim when im not braking?
    I think the problem is pretty straightforward: you don't have the wheel axle seated correctly in the dropouts. One end of the axle is slightly lower than the other, and so the whole wheel tilts a bit and the brakes appear to be out of their proper position relative to the rim. I've done this a couple times, and it drove me nuts until I figured it out.

    Remove that quick release skewer completely and make sure the axle is sitting in its proper place, all the way in the top of the dropouts.

    Then put the skewer back in and tighten it up. Now undo whatever you did to those brakes, they should work in the proper centered position now.
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  18. #18
    Member MarkD's Avatar
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    I know this is no good to you with you living over there but this is where I get my stuff from and this is their brake selection jut to give you an idea. http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/C...CategoryID=190
    I have the LX set with the replaceable holders with WTB inserts.
    Be careful not to get the abrasive pads as they are for ceramic rims only and they will chew through your alloy rims in no time. If you are getting a new fork though get one that is disk compatible and stick a hydraulic disk on it. But then again you would need a disk compatible hub too, it was just a thought.

  19. #19
    Indecisive rookie
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    the fork im getting is disc compatible, should i just look for a cheaper set of disc brakes?

    anyone? annyone? bueller bueller?

  20. #20
    Member MarkD's Avatar
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    Yeah the fork is but then you have to go to the expense of a new wheel with a hub that suits though.

  21. #21
    Indecisive rookie
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    :'( im getting into a big mess, i guess ill stay with the deore v brakes and ill grab those pads somewhere

  22. #22
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
    I disagree. The tire he installed is a 2.5 inch tire. Installing such a wide tire often affects other things on a bike.
    Nope.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriate
    Nope.
    Now that's just being arrogant!

    Off of the top of my head I've seen wide mountain bike tires, usually not even as wide as 2.5", that affected the following: Wheels won't squeeze past the brake pads. Tire hit the chain stays. Front derailleur hit the tire when in the granny ring. I'm sure I could come up with one or two more if I wanted to waste more time thinking about it.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Sorry, no offense meant. But as long as the tire is not rubbing on any part of the bike, it should have no effect on the relationship between the rim and brakes.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriate
    Sorry, no offense meant. But as long as the tire is not rubbing on any part of the bike, it should have no effect on the relationship between the rim and brakes.
    Yeah, I think I might have been a little harsh too. Sorry. In this case I think that this guy has a brake that won't line up well enough that the brake arm is rubbing on the side knobs of his new, wider tire. That Tektro brake isn't the greatest to work with. For no more than new brake arms cost, I'd replace it with a Shimano or Avid brake and solve the problem for good.

    Calling myself a Retro Grouch I often take heat for advising people to buy new parts rather than to fight with adjusting old ones. I think part of that is because not very many people understand quality differences. Most of the difference is stuff that you can't see like precision fit and lack of burrs on mateing parts. My experience has been that often just slightly more expensive parts are much easier to adjust and stay adjusted better.

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