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Old 03-20-17, 05:09 PM   #1
tara1234
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V brakes on road bike in city?

Hey so I have noticed that my brakes are pretty awful (Single pull side caliper). I am currently running only a front brake which is normally ok but with these brakes I seam to only have a slow down brake and cant do an emergency stop.

I have downtube shifters so dont have to worry about there not being brifters that support V brakes.

I contacted my LBS and they said it would be 30 to weld V brake posts to the front or 60 to weld both front and back. A pair of levers for V brakes would cost me about 20.

Is there a reason I shouldn't do this and should just go for modern calipers or would dual pivot calipers provide enough stopping power. I do bomb about the city sometimes at 20 MPH so I dont really feel that safe with my current brake setup.

I mostly ride it for work and google maps often takes me through little side.

Road bikes never used V brakes so im wondering if theres a good reason for this, they did however use cantis and now use disks.

If I should go for V brakes should I do both front and back or would just the front be enough?
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Old 03-20-17, 05:19 PM   #2
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You need to add to the cost v-brake specific levers and a re-paint of the frame, once that's all in, you may as well to to Halfords of Decathalon and get a complete bike, as it will be similar in cost, and work better.

For road bikes never using v-brakes, there was no need, v-brakes solved a problem (ease of user setup) for MTB's, road bikes never had this issue, add to that they aren't particularly attractive or aerodynamic on a road bike.
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Old 03-20-17, 05:28 PM   #3
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Modern dual pivot brakes work very well.. V brakes you need a new fork with the pivot studs on it.


V brakes were on Mountain bikes with fat tires, they have less hand fatigue, as a result of braking on long downhills ..

But for practicality and safety, get brakes for front and rear wheels. even on a fixie..

centre pull brakes also use a centre bolt to the frame . they have a lot of mechanical advantage.

the pivot is on the arch behind the brake arms. they cross over each other, pulled Up by the cable yoke.










....

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Old 03-20-17, 05:51 PM   #4
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Dual pivot calipers work much better than single pivots - especially cheap single pivot. This would not require any modification to the bike frame. Tektro makes a good reasonably priced line of them which the C&V crowd often uses to upgrade old bikes. You will need to figure out if you need "nutted" or "recessed" mounts as well as what brake reach you'll need so the pads reach your rims. Searching these items will give you an idea of how to figure those things out.

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Old 03-20-17, 06:55 PM   #5
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i have a set of v brakes lying around could use the back for front trick.

It would cost only 30 for the welding job.
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Old 03-20-17, 07:02 PM   #6
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are dual
calipers as strong as cantilevers?
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Old 03-20-17, 08:50 PM   #7
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i have a set of v brakes lying around could use the back for front trick.
It would cost only 30 for the welding job.
I don't know that anyone would recommend welding V/Canti mounts on a frame not equipped with them when effective affordable dual pivot calipers are readily available. Have you tried any of the usual brake performance "fixes" like cleaning the brake track on the rims, sanding the pads a bit, a good adjustment? Maybe Kool stop pads?
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Old 03-20-17, 09:10 PM   #8
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are dual
calipers as strong as cantilevers?
yes.

I have bikes with dual pivots, V-brakes and cantis; with care and patience, all three can be set up to be equally effective. Dual pivots and V-brakes are the easiest to set up. Cantis require patience.
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Old 03-20-17, 09:33 PM   #9
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get kool stop salmon pads

if still not good enough, get 5800 105 dual pivots

V-brakes work fine on road bikes, but in your case it'll be considerable trouble for something which should have an elegant solution.

As far as whether you should put a brake on your rear wheel. Yes.
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Old 03-20-17, 09:57 PM   #10
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Unsaid is that at some point we need to learn to ride within our equipment. When better brakes come about we'll all be asking about whether this new system is worth going to at XX cost. Oh wait! It's called disks...


Ok got that off my chest. Dual pivot calipers are stronger stoppers then single pivots are. But as mentioned there's a lot of other factors that can be made best too, for a lot less then frame mods. Making frame mods is usually thought as a last resort, not a first option. Andy
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Old 03-20-17, 11:30 PM   #11
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60 pounds sounds like a really good price for the frame work, but honestly, with all the other costs (particularly paint if you want it to look good) it's getting into the range of a new frameset. What tires are you running, and what kind of clearance does your frame offer? The only reason I'd want V brakes over dual pivot calipers is if it allowed me to clear bigger tires/fenders.

I'd buy some decent modern dual pivot brake calipers (possibly with kool stop salmon pads) and call it a day. You will have to check how much brake reach you need--this is measured from the brake mounting bolt to the middle of the rim .If this is insufficient, buy a bike with hydraulic discs.
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Old 03-21-17, 04:03 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by tara1234 View Post
i have a set of v brakes lying around could use the back for front trick.

It would cost only 30 for the welding job.
Make sure it's a good welding job. Weaken the fork and you could end up in a nasty endo
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Old 03-21-17, 07:07 AM   #13
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Look around at all the road bikes that cross your path. What kind of brakes do they have? If you see a trend (and I'm pretty sure that you will) you can assume that the majority of those riders are satisfied with their brake performance.

If it was my bike, I'd copy what they have. Sometimes boring is good.
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Old 03-21-17, 07:28 AM   #14
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Assuming you have old single pivots, go with dual pivot calipers. They're much better than old singles and you won't need to change levers. If you don't know the difference, look it up with Sheldon. Tektro are great for minimal $.
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Old 03-21-17, 08:39 AM   #15
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Assuming you have old single pivots, go with dual pivot calipers. They're much better than old singles and you won't need to change levers. If you don't know the difference, look it up with Sheldon. Tektro are great for minimal $.
+1. If your single pivot caliper has Weinmann stamped on it, that would be a +2. Weinmann caliper brakes are better than nothing but they're not a lot better.
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Old 03-21-17, 08:50 AM   #16
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Why wouldn't you get dual pivot brakes?
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Old 03-21-17, 11:09 AM   #17
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I would never weld/braze something to a fork of a bike. The metal in those things is tempered to be strong and flexible. Once you mess with the heat treatment, it'll probably be brittle and there's no way in hell I'd want my fork to be brittle.
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Old 03-21-17, 11:15 AM   #18
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22.49 GBP

wiggle.com | Shimano Tiagra 4700 Front Brake Caliper | Rim Brakes
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Old 03-21-17, 12:53 PM   #19
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weld brakes on? what bike, downtube shifters.. are we talking about?
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Old 03-21-17, 01:50 PM   #20
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You can improve your existing brakes:
* True the wheel, so it doesn't wobble. You just need spoke wrench. Get a set of spoke wrenches. There are videos on YouTube about truing.
* Install new pads like the old ones and move them as close to the rim as possible: wiggle.com | Ashima Caliper Brake Blocks | Rim Brake Pads
* Install new pads of the current standard. You may need to file the slots in the brakes, so the pad bolts fit inside. wiggle.com | LifeLine Essential Road Brake Holders and Inserts - 4 Pack | Rim Brake Pads

You can change the brakes to dual-pivot brakes.
You should first measure the reach. I guess your brakes are medium reach, 57mm. Installing and Adjusting Caliper Brakes
Then you should check if they use recessed mounting or traditional hex-bolt mounting. You can enlarge the hole in the fork to fit a recessed bolt. wiggle.com Cycle | Rim Brakes

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Old 03-21-17, 02:41 PM   #21
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While I'm not up on the latest Shimano I know there may compatibility issues with levers/calipers due to changes from SLR/SuperSLR/"New" Super SLR and lever pull especially in the 4600/4700 models. I know there are STI shifting compatibility issues with these series.


Given that the bike has single pivots, tell me it's older, I'd also worry about brake reach with these. It always seems older "non race" bikes need longer reach than newer dual pivots have. that's why tektros are often used on older stuff as they have models with long/short reach as well as nutted and recessed mounting options.
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Old 03-21-17, 02:59 PM   #22
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Don't go too OCD on this ..when the Shimano cable pull ratio change happened , the designers at TRP,

The makers of a popular mini V brake for cyclocross racing, just added 6mm to their length.. 8.4 -> 9..




..
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Old 03-21-17, 03:25 PM   #23
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Don't overlook the levers and cables when upgrading your system. If the levers and cables flex a lot (and cheap ones usually do) you'll lose a lot of braking response.

When looking at an upgrade to dual caliper, you need to make sure you get one with enough reach. Many current Shimano dual pivots max out at 49mm reach. You probably need more than that. Ask your LBS about this. Tektro R539 or R559 (depending on how much reach you need) should do the trick. Pair those with a decent quality lever (Tektro R340 will do) and good cable housing. If you still want more power, upgrade to Kool Stop pads. If you still want more power after that, upgrade to compressionless brake cable housing. If you still want more power after that, you're doing something wrong.
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Old 03-21-17, 04:31 PM   #24
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I had two bikes with old single pivot brakes, that had gotten quite mushy. One pair was "Schwinn Approved" and the other was low end Dia-Compe. Switching to new Tektro dual pivots was a huge improvement. I re-used the existing cables and levers, which were still in good condition.
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Old 03-21-17, 04:52 PM   #25
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On an older bike, it's possible that the wheels have steel rims, which may affect braking.
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