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  1. #1
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    Removal handlebars

    I have a Nishiki International with the original aluminum handlebar post. I have tried traditional and non-traditional methods to get the post out (to replace with adjustable -eight post) but haven't been able move it at all. Can anybody help?

  2. #2
    Ouch, my knuckles!
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    I assume by "handlebar post" you mean stem. I don't know what you have tried but the removal method for a stem of that era goes something like this. Unscrew the allen key or bolt at the top of the stem. As you unscrew it the bolt will rise up. Keep turning it until it is half an inch/15mm above the stem. Now take a rubber mallet and hit it. If you don't have a rubber mallet then place a board on the bolt and hit it with a hammer. It may take a strong pop with the hammer if some rust has set in.

    There is a plug or wedge at the end of the bolt and you are breaking it free by hitting the bolt. Once the wedge/plug is loose the stem usually is freed immediately. On rare occasions you may need to apply some liquid wrench and twisting to free the stem but I only recall this on steel stems.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OuchMan
    I assume by "handlebar post" you mean stem. I don't know what you have tried but the removal method for a stem of that era goes something like this. Unscrew the allen key or bolt at the top of the stem. As you unscrew it the bolt will rise up. Keep turning it until it is half an inch/15mm above the stem. Now take a rubber mallet and hit it. If you don't have a rubber mallet then place a board on the bolt and hit it with a hammer. It may take a strong pop with the hammer if some rust has set in.

    There is a plug or wedge at the end of the bolt and you are breaking it free by hitting the bolt. Once the wedge/plug is loose the stem usually is freed immediately. On rare occasions you may need to apply some liquid wrench and twisting to free the stem but I only recall this on steel stems.

    Good luck.
    On plug type quills, the base of the quill often takes a permantnt set against the steerer tube,and knocking the plug out does little or nothing to release the quill. I have had to physcially wrestle more than one out even after considerable soaking with suitable liquids.

  4. #4
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    Thanks very much for trying to help, however by "traditional methods" I meant just that; the plug has been dislodged and is free, I have applied penetrant every day for a week, have hammered the stem, have applied maximum torque short of distorting the fork and I now assume that galvanic action between aluminum and steel tube has kind of welded the two. I have been to two bicycle shops but their efforts were fruitless as well. I need some oustanding imaginitive approach! Thanks, Coumans

  5. #5
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Pipe wrench. Brace the fork and get the stem to rotate using the wrench.
    Crack the corrosion weld and it'll pop out. Maybe...I've only been defeated once.
    Might take an extra set of hands.

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