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Old 06-30-05, 08:47 PM   #1
56/12 and 22/28
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Help With Overhaul.

What tools would i need to do a complete overhaul on my bicycle?

Eh?
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Old 06-30-05, 08:50 PM   #2
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If you have to ask that question I don't think you are quite ready to do a complete overhaul...
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Old 06-30-05, 08:52 PM   #3
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k

Eh?
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Old 06-30-05, 09:06 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 56/12 and 22/28
k

Eh?
Was I not clear?

Bicycles are not exactly nuclear physics, but it does take some time and experience to learn how to work on them. Most people start with simple stuff like adjusting derailleurs and repacking bearings. As you develop a feel for how things work and how they are put together you progress to more complicated tasks. Overhauls require knowledge of numerous sytems.

Are you really qualified to R&R your bottom bracket, adjust your brakes (upon which your life may someday depend!) or adjust index shifting?

I've been working on bikes for more than 35 years, and I still remember the broken bolts, scraped knuckes and stripped threads that led me to believe that I might finally be learning something.

Don't try to run until you learn to walk.
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Old 06-30-05, 09:07 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by 56/12 and 22/28
What tools would i need to do a complete overhaul on my bicycle?

Eh?
Just a 3" piece of plastic that says "VISA" on it
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Old 06-30-05, 09:15 PM   #6
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Well said! Both of you.
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Old 06-30-05, 09:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmfnla
If you have to ask that question I don't think you are quite ready to do a complete overhaul...
Put another way, does it have a threadless or threaded HS, cartridge(shimano or campy) or cup and ball BB, cartridge or cup and ball hubs, campy or shimano cassette or a freewheel and what brand freewheel, self extracting or non self extracting cranks?
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Old 06-30-05, 09:33 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by sydney
Put another way, does it have a threadless or threaded HS, cartridge(shimano or campy) or cup and ball BB, cartridge or cup and ball hubs, campy or shimano cassette or a freewheel and what brand freewheel, self extracting or non self extracting cranks?
Road bike, mountain bike, 1-30 speed, recumbent, track fixie, tallbike, cruiser, chopper, adult tricycle....?
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Old 06-30-05, 09:43 PM   #9
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Road bike, mountain bike, 1-30 speed, recumbent, track fixie, tallbike, cruiser, chopper, adult tricycle....?
...old French POS?
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Old 06-30-05, 10:08 PM   #10
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You guys are being brutal. Instead of belittling the guy, tell him that it is more than just having the tools to overhaul a bike, but having the knowledge is needed also.You people seem to get as much enjoyment in putting down people of less experience as you do in making sure everyone knows how much you think you know. I thought the idea of this forum was a place to get help, not a place to be put down.
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Old 06-30-05, 10:25 PM   #11
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Yeah, instead of insulting him, why don't you give him a link to a 'do it yourself' book or something. Show him a link to park tools or something.
Then mention, if he didn't know what tools he would need, he better research each step before even putting the bike on the stand.
Oh but to answer his question, you should get a bike tool kit:
http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/119...ntool-Kit-.htm
I believe this has everything you would need, unless you have a non-shimano based drivetrain, actually i think it would have to be a non-mtb non-shimano bike.
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Old 07-01-05, 10:43 AM   #12
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The problem here is how the question was asked. Yes, I was wry when I inferred that he should just pay someone, but it was also the correct answer given the information. If you asked a carpenter an overly-generalized question such as,"So, how do I build a house?" without providing any clue as to what type of structure you desired to build, the answer would be the same....pay someone to do it. In rmfnla's defense, it is ludicrous and a bit insulting for someone to ask for information accumulated over a lifetime of experience from someone that has obviously spent a great deal of effort learning and building skill in as their vocation as if it could be answered with a sentence. Sure, the Lifu kit might be a good start toward someone teaching themselves bicycle repair, but it could be a complete and frustrating waste of money given certain types of bicycles, and the fact that they are very low quality tools. That kit doesn't include a lot of the basic tools and supplies used in a typical overhaul, nor information on how to use them. Without information, the tools are lifeless and inert objects, with no inherent magical properties. Having a paintbrush does not make one an artist, nor does having a chisel make one a sculptor. The correct answer to the question:"What tools would i need to do a complete overhaul on my bicycle, Eh?" is...a bikeshop full, as any professional mechanic can attest to.
A better suggestion would be to invest in knowledge. That said, my reccommendation is to buy Lennard Zinn's book, and allow Lennard to make his living through book sales, or go to an online tutorial site (just Google "Bicycle Overhaul") and allow them to profit by clicking on their advertisements.
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Old 07-01-05, 05:01 PM   #13
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Well said, Wordbiker.

The intention was not to belittle anyone but to point out the magnitude of what he was asking.

No one is born knowing this stuff, and no one learns it overnight (or from a chat site). I'm all for people learning how to do this; hell, that's what we all did!

Probably a better answer would be a good book or one of the many links already referenced here or on other threads, or maybe one of the maintenance classes given by community colleges (I've taught a few of those; great place to meet female riders ).

BTW, if you others thought those were insults you need to do a search on some of sydney's classics!

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Old 07-01-05, 05:06 PM   #14
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Yes, ok dude. You need at least some Screwdrivers, Hammers, 10mm box wrench, Allens, Spoke wrench. Something are better left alone...Bottom Bracket! Sheldon Browns website is pretty nice for stuff.
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Old 07-01-05, 05:12 PM   #15
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go to danscomp.com look at the park tool sets and that what u need,,,u dont have to get park tools,, some are a waste,,,craftsman makes all the same stuff- except bike ones,, like cassettes and BB tools- and they have a lifetime warrenty...
dont listen to these jacka$$' just do what i said!!

good luck!
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Old 07-01-05, 05:36 PM   #16
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go to danscomp.com look at the park tool sets and that what u need,,,u dont have to get park tools,, some are a waste,,,craftsman makes all the same stuff- except bike ones,, like cassettes and BB tools- and they have a lifetime warrenty...
dont listen to these jacka$$' just do what i said!!

good luck!
Great advice! In fact, harris_co will let you practice with your new tools on his bike!

"Good luck" indeed!

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Old 07-01-05, 09:19 PM   #17
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I once saw a "bike repair for beginers" book, and the first thing it sugested was goign to your local thrift store/ swap meet and buying a $10 bike. Then go through the entire book and practice removing, adjusting and installing everything.

Although it sounded dumb when I read it, working on my dad's 1970's road bike turned out to be the best way to learn what worked and what didn't.

The park tools website is very usefull too. I now have a good $300 invested in park stuff, but even the "cheap" tools work well. performance has a decnt looking tool set for $40

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=4218

the question was a broad one, but anyone who is willing to put in the time and a little bit of money can do most basic bike repairs.
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Old 07-02-05, 12:45 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordbiker
The problem here is how the question was asked. Yes, I was wry when I inferred that he should just pay someone, but it was also the correct answer given the information. If you asked a carpenter an overly-generalized question such as,"So, how do I build a house?" without providing any clue as to what type of structure you desired to build, the answer would be the same....pay someone to do it. ...
The whole post was well expressed. Over generalized questions just beg for flippant answers. I remember actually being asked once, "How do they build buildings?" It was an honest but naive question asked by someone who grew up in a very rural area as we were driving through a big city. The only answer I could think of was, "They generally start from the ground and work up."

But there are some people who can't wait for such questions and are happy to expound endlessly. When I worked in research we used to describe those people as the ones whom you might ask the time of day ..and they would begin to explain how to build a clock.

Somewhere in between is a good compromise. Some years ago I picked up an old Mercian frame off the neighbor's garbage (and was about to start a new hobby). I asked an apparently experienced wrench a similarly naive question. He simply said, "Why don't you start by measuring the rear drops." I still consider that to have been a brilliantly simple answer. It gave me a foothold to begin.
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Old 07-03-05, 08:02 PM   #19
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I once saw a "bike repair for beginers" book, and the first thing it sugested was goign to your local thrift store/ swap meet and buying a $10 bike. Then go through the entire book and practice removing, adjusting and installing everything.
This is how I am learning the fine art of bicycle maintenance. I've got a 17 year old bike that I've been slowly rebuilding using Jim Langley's book. After my inital read of the book, I was totally confused about what specific tools to use. So I went and bought a $40 toolkit from Nashbar. So far it has every tool that I've needed. I figure that if I need any other tools, I'll go down to the LBS and buy them.
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