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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sir Lunch-a-lot's Avatar
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    Bike Seems To Just Want To Fall Apart

    Hi. I got seriously into biking a little over a year ago. I guess it was the movie "The Fast And The Furious" that did it to me. I have no car, so my bike was the closest thing to a car. So I got searching the internet, and my interest grew, and I have started biking far more than I used to.

    I have a Nishiki (what model I do not know). When I first got it, one of the cranks kept falling off. My idea (at the time) of fixing it was to hammer it into place. This ruined the threads, so we had to get a new crank. Okay, an old crank. We took it off my old Mountain bike. My friend assisted me with getting it on. It only fell off once after that. Now, for years it gave me little to no problems. This may be due to the fact that: a.) I did not ride very fast. b.) I did not ride very much or very far.

    So one day, shortly after watching the fast and the furious, I take my bike out to the school track to see how fast I can do 1 lap. Halfway through, it starts acting weird and is hard to pedal. I looked and saw nothing wrong, so I kept going. Less than 1/4 lap later, the deraileur is toast. The mount bent into the spokes, and it got chewed up.

    Fortunately, my Opa had a bunch of old parts kicking about, so I was able to replace the deraileur, and the chain (too many links were twisted out of shape).

    Eventually, I have to replace the pedal on the crank (the same crank that I had mentioned replacing earlier. The pedal was kind of bend from the start). Time goes by, and the replacement pedal starts to bend as well.

    So, I go about, riding somewhat regularly. One day, I was riding along the irrigation canal, when I lose my pedal. The same one I just replace. It just snapped right off at the base. So I limp home on my bike, and replace it. More time goes by, I think I wind up replacing another pedal at some point in time. Now, yesterday, I am riding my bike to work, and the pedal on the original crank breaks! Fortunately, the pedal axle was still there, but the rest of the pedal came right off. So, when I get home, I replace it.



    Now, my question to you guys is this: Do you have any idea as to WHY I have such pedal problems? Could it be the fact that they are older pedals to begin with? Could having size 14 extra wide feet play a role? I usually don't ride standing up. I only put my bodys weight on the pedals when dismounting. Could there maybe be something weird in my pedaling style that is causing me to go through so many pedals? Anybody else have this problem, or am I just an oddball? At the rate I'm going, I'll be out of spare pedals in a year or two, and then biking is going to start costing a lot in pedals.

    I'm going to be leaving home for a bit over a month this summer, and I want to continue biking without having to worry about suddenly finding myself 2 pedals short of a bike. Any help/sugestions would be greatly appreciated.
    Pythagorean Theorum: 24 words. Lord's Prayer: 66 words. 10 Commandments: 179 words. Gettysburg Address: 286 words. Declaration of Independence: 1,300 words. U.S. Government Regulations on the Sale of Cabbage: 26,911 words.

  2. #2
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    sydney thinks he should go smoke some carpet now.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Sir Lunch-a-lot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    sydney thinks he should go smoke some carpet now.
    Beg your pardon?
    Pythagorean Theorum: 24 words. Lord's Prayer: 66 words. 10 Commandments: 179 words. Gettysburg Address: 286 words. Declaration of Independence: 1,300 words. U.S. Government Regulations on the Sale of Cabbage: 26,911 words.

  4. #4
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    Either get a car or a new bike....
    .cinelli.olympic.surly.long.haul.trucker.kona.ku.surly.steamroller.
    .litespeed.classic.litespeed.firenze.bianchi.pista.dean.colonel.plus.more.

  5. #5
    Keep Right Except to Pass
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    With size 14 dogs you must be a large fellow. What do you weigh? Not that this should really matter with quality pedals.

    I think it's probably just poor quality parts to blame. And maybe your size is a contributing factor.

    I don't know why syd posts such barnyard waste.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    Spoked to Death phidauex's Avatar
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    Please don't get a car...

    I think you may need a new bike. Then get a book about bike maintainence, and read every part of it. Then, when you aren't sure how to fix something, take it to a bike shop, have them fix it, and explain what they did and why.

    Then smoke some of sydney's carpet, he certainly seems to enjoy it.

    peace,
    sam

  7. #7
    Senior Member rufvelo's Avatar
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    This is the reason most of us carry several sets of pedals on all rides Sorry.

    Just take it to a bike shop and get it 'professionally' fixed.

  8. #8
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    Sounds like your bike just needs some routine maintenance and an inspection now and then. Or replace a few worn out or damaged parts. Or if you fee like spending some money, buy a sturdy bike, new or used, that suits your needs.

  9. #9
    Bike Junkie roccobike's Avatar
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    You did not state the model or age of your Nishiki, but this brand typically made very good mid range to high end bikes. Some of the previous recommendations include replacing your bike with a new unit. If your funds are limited and you are considering a low end, department store bike, I would think your money would be better spent repairing the Nishiki professionally.

  10. #10
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roccobike
    You did not state the model or age of your Nishiki, but this brand typically made very good mid range to high end bikes.
    They also made alot of bottom of the barrel junk. Maybe not Huffy quality, but close.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    sydney thinks he should go smoke some carpet now.
    That explains a lot. Of course, many of us were under the impression you quit smoking.

  12. #12
    "Uh-uh. Respek Knuckles." hypersnazz's Avatar
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    Go to a reputable shop and buy a reputable bike. Then please, PLEASE don't do your own maintenance on it, let a reputable professional work on it.

    Bicycle maintenance is one of those things that makes most people go, "How hard could it be?" and then they get upset and frustrated when the bike starts falling apart "for no reason". There's a reason good bikes cost a lot of money and there's a reason good bike shops with the proper tools and skilled mechanics stay in business.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypersnazz
    Go to a reputable shop and buy a reputable bike. Then please, PLEASE don't do your own maintenance on it, let a reputable professional work on it.

    Bicycle maintenance is one of those things that makes most people go, "How hard could it be?" and then they get upset and frustrated when the bike starts falling apart "for no reason". There's a reason good bikes cost a lot of money and there's a reason good bike shops with the proper tools and skilled mechanics stay in business.
    Please...don't. That's the sort of elitist, self-serving attitude promoted by mechanics.

    First of all, to the original poster, how much do you weigh? A good set of pedals should be able to take any weight. If I were you, I would replace the crank, BB, and pedals at this point...

  14. #14
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phidauex

    Then smoke some of sydney's carpet, he certainly seems to enjoy it.

    peace,
    sam
    Make sure it's organically grown hemp.That synthetic stuff will give you brian rot.

  15. #15
    Seņor Member RedFerret's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypersnazz
    Bicycle maintenance is one of those things that makes most people go, "How hard could it be?" and then they get upset and frustrated when the bike starts falling apart "for no reason". There's a reason good bikes cost a lot of money and there's a reason good bike shops with the proper tools and skilled mechanics stay in business.
    He's on an old Nishiki, I would think that would be the perfect bike to learn on. I have no doubt that it takes experience and skill to maintain a bike but I'm sure he could learn. Lunch-a-lot, I wouldn't give up doing your own maintenance but picking up a bike maintenance book might be a good idea.

    If your pedals are coming unscrewed and falling off you might want to try wrapping the threads in lucite or silicon. You should be able to get some at any hardware store. I had this problem with the pedals on my Felt, and they seem to be holding up well. Just check them before you head out to make sure they are on tight.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    Make sure it's organically grown hemp.That synthetic stuff will give you brian rot.
    This may be the first time we've agreed on something.

    [edit] You mean brain rot, right?

  17. #17
    Senior Member peripatetic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypersnazz
    Go to a reputable shop and buy a reputable bike. Then please, PLEASE don't do your own maintenance on it, let a reputable professional work on it.

    A lot of old Nishikis are quite reputable bikes. Nothing wrong starting here. And if he were to go out and purchase a newer, $1,000+ bike, he wouldn't be able to learn a thing about fixing it. Which would then render your next statement a self-fulfilling prophecy:


    Quote Originally Posted by hypersnazz

    There's a reason good bikes cost a lot of money and there's a reason good bike shops with the proper tools and skilled mechanics stay in business.





    There are also a lot of reasons why new bikes can't be worked on very easily (kind of like new cars), and why bike shops that work on them sell them and scare their customers into thinking they won't be able to ride anything cheaper or older.


    Maybe you should head on over to Trek or Cannondale's merchandising/distributing forums.


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