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  1. #1
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    What to get, what to know?

    Hello all, I'm new to riding but loving every minute of it. I have already learned so much from reading the many terrific posts here.
    Other than needing to replace my saddle for a more female-friendly one, can someone please tell me what basic equipment I should carry with me on a long ride? I am training for a 150 mile ride in late September- fully supported, but I want to be prepared for anything. I am riding a Trek 7500 hybrid.
    Thanks in advance,
    Mary Lynn

  2. #2
    riding a Pinarello Prince orguasch's Avatar
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    Mary Lynn,
    welcome to BFC, there no need to worry if your ride is fully supported, or may be bring a couple of inner tubes, patches, water bottle and your"bank card, or as they say no one goes without one'Mastercard or Visa Card" looks like I am advertising for this people
    "Racso", the well oiled machine;)

  3. #3
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    I recommend that for long training rides you carry:

    1. what you need to fix a flat (a pump, spare tube, patch kit, tire levers)

    2. Tools for simple repair and/or adjustment (chain tool, spoke wrench, allen wrenches - or a multi-tool that contains these things).

    3. Plenty to drink and some source of quick energy like a Powerbar (unless you know you will be riding past places to buy this stuff.

    4. Money for a phone call or a cell phone.

    Most of this will fit in a combination of a seat pack and bike jersey pockets. If you choose to carry water or some other drink in a Camelback type pack, most have pockets for additional storage as well.

    I find that when I have all these things, I rarely need them. It is when I don't have them that the need usually arises.

    Have fun and enjoy the ride!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    If your hybrid has large knobbly tyres, you should consider swapping them for something more efficient on the road. I find that a wider 28mm or a narrower 32mm slick tyre is very effective on hybrid rims and works well even on rough roads and tracks. Keep them pumped as hard as you can (80 to 90 psi).

    You should be using some form of shoe retension on the pedals for safety and efficiency. I find that toe-clips are good enough for non-racing use, esp if your shoes are a little stiffer than the average tennis shoe. The modern alternative is a clipless pedal system, but this is less useful for short jaunts around town on a utility bike.

    You should probably wear a helmet and gloves, and for longer rides over 10 miles, cycling shorts.

    When you get the tools, practice changing an inner tube and fixing an old chain at home. Ask your locl bike shop to show you how.

    Although rides are supported, the support vehicle may be some time coming, its much better to be able to get going yourself. You will need to be more self-sufficient on your training rides.

  5. #5
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    Thanks so much you guys- I am so new at this, and I really appreciate your advice. Get this-- I bought a lady's bike, and have been complaining about the seat being so uncomfortable-- went in today for a tune-up and to look at some of the tools, etc. that you guys recommended. When I complained about the seat, the female manager asked me why I had a lady's bike and a man's seat!! I didn't even realize that I had the wrong thing... My word, the lady's seat sure does feel better! Anyway, getting my new stuff tomorrow when I pick up my bike.

    Thanks again-- ML

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    This may be a consideration you have already addressed, but along the same lines of having a comfortable saddle is having a pair of cycling shorts. If your 150 ride is a 2-day, wash or rinse your shorts at the end of the first day's ride and let 'em dry (inside out) overnight.

    Cheers!


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