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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sincitycycler's Avatar
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    I don't know what the difference is between tubular or clincher. Is is the inner tube or tire? Do you have to reaplace a clincher equipped rim with only a clincer, blah, blah... Confused!!
    "How did all those 'Keep Off the Grass' signs get there?"

  2. #2
    Senior Member Stubacca's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Spoked to Death phidauex's Avatar
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    In short... Clinchers are the 'regular' tires you've probably used before. They 'clinch' onto the rim of the tire, held in place by the pressure from the innertube.

    Tubular tires have no tube, they are a whole tube of tire material, and they are glued or taped to the rim. They are lighter, but harder to fix, so are popular for racing, and not very popular for 'on the street' use.

    There are also 'tubeless' tires, which are like car tires, they look like a clincher, but they seal against the rim, and then the rim and tire inflate with air with no innertube, they are pretty new, and are popular in mountainbike applications.

    In general, the type of rim you have determines the tire you can use. Clinchers on clincher rims, tubulars on tubular rims. Tufo makes a tubular that can go on a clincher rim, but the opposite is never true.

    peace,
    sam

  4. #4
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phidauex
    In short... Clinchers are the 'regular' tires you've probably used before. They 'clinch' onto the rim of the tire, held in place by the pressure from the innertube.

    Tubular tires have no tube, they are a whole tube of tire material, and they are glued or taped to the rim. They are lighter, but harder to fix, so are popular for racing, and not very popular for 'on the street' use.

    There are also 'tubeless' tires, which are like car tires, they look like a clincher, but they seal against the rim, and then the rim and tire inflate with air with no innertube, they are pretty new, and are popular in mountainbike applications.

    In general, the type of rim you have determines the tire you can use. Clinchers on clincher rims, tubulars on tubular rims. Tufo makes a tubular that can go on a clincher rim, but the opposite is never true.

    peace,
    sam
    Sam, of course tubulars have tubes; how do you think the air is kept in the tire? Sounds like you've never actually used them.

    The big deal with tubulars is that they are sewn up before they are glued to the rim, which is why they are also called "sew-ups". This gives several benefits; see the link Stubacca so thoughtfully provided.

    Interstingly enough, Sheldon omitted one tubular benefit; the rims tend to be stronger because they can be "roll-formed" instead of extruded. Other than that, they are a pain. especially considering how good clinchers are getting.
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  5. #5
    Spoked to Death phidauex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmfnla
    Sam, of course tubulars have tubes; how do you think the air is kept in the tire? Sounds like you've never actually used them.
    Its true, I don't have extensive experience with them. But the ones I do have experience with don't have tubes, though I suppose most do. http://www.tufo.com/index.php?lg=en

    An exception to every rule..

    peace,
    sam

  6. #6
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    I stand corrected; I never heard of those. Thanks for the link!

    I rode tubulars for years, back in the toe-clip days. Tubes or not, the glue is a pain; I don't miss them.
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  7. #7
    BIKE MECHANIC king koeller's Avatar
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    Tubulars also have the best ride, in terms of feel , cushion, grip, response,cornering, ride quality,,, ect. Back in the toe clip days (1975-1984), i rode century rides on nothing but sew-ups, mavic red label rims and campy large flange hubs with 110 pounds of pressure . Fantastic!! Campy Nuevo Record crank (drilled out) 52-42 with rear cluster 14,15,17,19,21,.
    yes the glue is a pain, but do you want the tire to come off? hell no!
    Properly done there is no mess and it's a breeze.
    I still only ride on tubulars, the real deal!
    1976 Centurion Super Lemans 23"C-T Double butted chrome-moly Nervex style lugs Campy NR Wright Leather fiamme red label tubular rims Metallic silver, 1984-BCA 21.5"c-t Tange double butted lugged Shimano bio-pace Leather Brooks B-17 Champion Standard honey Black w Red head tube Lugged frame, 1986 FOCUS 22"c-t Tange double butted lugged Suntour XC Sport Sugino VP triple Dia-Compe Canti's Brooks B-17 Champion Standard, Trek Elance 400D 1986 Reynolds 531 Full Shimano SIS Black metallic silver

  8. #8
    BIKE MECHANIC king koeller's Avatar
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    Don't forget that Lance Armstrong and his whole discovery team from the tour de france rode on sew-ups!!!
    1976 Centurion Super Lemans 23"C-T Double butted chrome-moly Nervex style lugs Campy NR Wright Leather fiamme red label tubular rims Metallic silver, 1984-BCA 21.5"c-t Tange double butted lugged Shimano bio-pace Leather Brooks B-17 Champion Standard honey Black w Red head tube Lugged frame, 1986 FOCUS 22"c-t Tange double butted lugged Suntour XC Sport Sugino VP triple Dia-Compe Canti's Brooks B-17 Champion Standard, Trek Elance 400D 1986 Reynolds 531 Full Shimano SIS Black metallic silver

  9. #9
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Off topic...but yes, I remember the day. Sew-ups, toe-clips, steel alloy frames, downtube shifters, some cat named Eddie Mercx (sp?) and a young Greg Lemond.

  10. #10
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by king koeller
    Tubulars also have the best ride, in terms of feel , cushion, grip, response,cornering, ride quality,,, ect. Back in the toe clip days (1975-1984), i rode century rides on nothing but sew-ups, mavic red label rims and campy large flange hubs with 110 pounds of pressure . Fantastic!! Campy Nuevo Record crank (drilled out) 52-42 with rear cluster 14,15,17,19,21,.
    yes the glue is a pain, but do you want the tire to come off? hell no!
    Properly done there is no mess and it's a breeze.
    I still only ride on tubulars, the real deal!
    I hear ya, king! Regina freewheels & chains, Cinelli bars, stem & seat ( never did like those Brooks or Ideals; too heavy!), Campy everything else.

    I had a tire come off once; I was doing a track stand waiting for my buddies (to go do a century!) and the tire rolled right off the rim. I hadn't had a flat in so long the glue dried up; broke my collar bone, but I still did the ride. I think those tire were Canettis; I know the frame was a 531 Crescent w/ Nervex lugs & a Wagner Crown.

    Hey, I'm not old enough to have "good old days"!

    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  11. #11
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    train on clinchers, race on sew-ups. The sew-up ride is still better. The only folks who claim otherwise haven't ridden both.

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