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Old 08-02-02, 05:40 PM   #1
john_dun
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Getting the rear cogs off.

I bought a tool to remove the rear cogs (freewheel). the thing is on so tight i cant get it off. I dont have any spanners that are big enough, so ive used a mole wrench which has a good grip but still it wont budge. How the hell do i get off!
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Old 08-02-02, 06:04 PM   #2
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You are turning it counterclockwise as viewed from the driveside, correct? You may need to put the tool in a bench vise, and it may take a hefty twist to start it turning. Don't be shy with it!
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Old 08-02-02, 07:01 PM   #3
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There's a reason that it's tight so don't forget to torque it correctly back on.

A chain whip is a necessity.

Good luck.
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Old 08-02-02, 07:05 PM   #4
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No need to torque it up when putting it back on.A freewheel is self tightening due to pedaling. Dat's why dey get so friggin tight,and hard to git offen.
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Old 08-02-02, 08:55 PM   #5
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Originally posted by pokey
No need to torque it up when putting it back on.A freewheel is self tightening due to pedaling. Dat's why dey get so friggin tight,and hard to git offen.
That is the situation with some older models where the ratchet is in the freewheel itself, but if you've got the rear cogs with the lock ring on top and the ratchet on the wheel, you need to make sure it's put back on nice and tight.
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Old 08-02-02, 09:16 PM   #6
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Da guy sed he had a freewheel.Freewheels are not the same as cassettes.Cassettes have da lockring thingey(and da ratchet mechanism in the hub) that need to be torqued up just so...... But shimano 6 speed cassettes did not have the lock ring thinngy,but the cassette was held on by the small cog which screwed on,and got tighted up by the pedaling,so same difference as freewheel. Even if he had a cassette,one does not need a chainwhip to torque it up,but olny to loosen it off,but you can use a rag or your teeth to holt it instead of the chainwhippy thinngy. Hope that helps.

Last edited by pokey; 08-02-02 at 09:22 PM.
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Old 08-02-02, 09:29 PM   #7
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Da guy sed he had a freewheel.Freewheels are not the same as cassettes.
Agreed. But some people still refer to cassettes as freewheels. (Not correct, but it happens.) Just covering the bases.

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.... but you can use a rag or your teeth to holt it instead of the chainwhippy thinngy. Hope that helps.
I don't think your dentist would approve.
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Old 08-02-02, 09:37 PM   #8
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What I have done several times is to take the remover tool get a 12" adjustable or vice grips to lock on the tool, set the wheel on the floor standing up, grab the wrench with one hand, and push down on it with your foot.
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Old 08-03-02, 05:42 AM   #9
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I used to undue my freewheels by taking an adjustable wrench and sticking it down the seat tube of an old bike frame. Then, you put the removal tool into the mouth of the wrench. Then find some way to stabilize the frame and turn the wheel. It should come off, just make sure you're turing the wheel the right way.

Of course, any piece of pipe, or a vice for that matter, would do.

And, when you put it back on, make sure to grease the threads (in case that is not obvious).

Cheers,
Jamie
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Old 08-03-02, 08:39 AM   #10
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Whats with all this monkeying around with wrenches and chainwhips?

Remove axle bolt/QR skewer
Put the freewheel removal tool into a bench vice, facing upwards.
Put the wheel onto the removal tool
Rotate the wheel anticlockwise.
The rim with an inflated tyre gives you very good grip and leverage, and you can use both hands.

I dont have a bench vice at my home, but local auto repair shops are quite willing to let be borrow theirs .
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Old 08-03-02, 12:45 PM   #11
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See http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml.

The wheel I am working on is off a very cheap bike and has no lockring. On the backside of the largest sprocket, there is a smaller diameter ring with notches that might fit a hook spanner. I assume this is what the special tool engages with.
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Old 08-03-02, 06:08 PM   #12
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If it's a freewheel,and you have the right tool,the tool goes in the end the small cog is on,not the backside. There are different tools for different barnds of freewheels.Maybe you should quit monkeying around and take it to a bike shop.Most have the tools and the cost if any is minimal.
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