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  1. #1
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    Schwinn headset removal

    I want to either overhaul or replace the (threaded) headset on an old Schwinn I picked up, but I can't figure out how I'm supposed to get it off. Whereas the Park Tool website suggests that there should be two hex thingies for me to turn relative to each other, I only see one (it turns with the fork). I tried holding the fork, but that didn't get anywhere without me worrying that I'd damage something. Any help would be appreciated.



    large headset picture: http://web.mit.edu/~xsdg/Public/pict...sc_9922.bf.jpg
    the bike: http://web.mit.edu/~xsdg/Public/pict...9929.small.jpg

  2. #2
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xsdg
    I want to either overhaul or replace the (threaded) headset on an old Schwinn I picked up, but I can't figure out how I'm supposed to get it off. Whereas the Park Tool website suggests that there should be two hex thingies for me to turn relative to each other, I only see one (it turns with the fork). I tried holding the fork, but that didn't get anywhere without me worrying that I'd damage something. Any help would be appreciated.



    large headset picture: http://web.mit.edu/~xsdg/Public/pict...sc_9922.bf.jpg
    the bike: http://web.mit.edu/~xsdg/Public/pict...9929.small.jpg
    A wrench on the hex thingy, and channel locks on the knurled thingy.A good dose of prnetrating oil first.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jason Curtiss's Avatar
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    First remove the hex nut, which is threaded to the front fork tube. Insert a board between the forks to prevent them from rotating as you unscrew the hex nut with a large wrench or socket. Once the hex nut is free, the knurled nut can be easily be removed by hand; there is no need for channel lock pliers on this nut.

    What type of Schwinn is it - Super Le Tour or Voyageur perhaps?

    Jason

  4. #4
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Curtiss
    First remove the hex nut, which is threaded to the front fork tube. Insert a board between the forks to prevent them from rotating as you unscrew the hex nut with a large wrench or socket. Once the hex nut is free, the knurled nut can be easily be removed by hand; there is no need for channel lock pliers on this nut.

    What type of Schwinn is it - Super Le Tour or Voyageur perhaps?

    Jason
    sydney always has channel locks but sometimes no board. A rag to pad the channel locks will prevent marring the beastie if that is worth worrying about.

  5. #5
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    Thanks; an overnight sit with some TriFlow and metal bar between the forks did the trick.

    Jason: I have no idea; the head tube badge has what I assume is a serial number. At the bottom of the seat tube it has a sticker with "Schwinn X-tra Lite Bicycles". At the top of the seat tube, it says:
    "Made in Taiwan
    for
    Schwinn Bicycle Company
    Chicago
    60639". The dropouts are horizontal without the screw thingie. There are currently no shifter bosses on it, but there are marks on the downtube where the shifter bosses should be (clamp-on?). There are two reddish-colored stickers (for decoration?) on the seat tube. If you can get a fix on it, I'd appreciate it.
    If Java had true garbage collection, most programs would delete themselves upon execution.
    -- Robert Sewell

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jason Curtiss's Avatar
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    nose picker,

    Wow, it sounds like it could be a Schwinn Voyageur!

    The Voyageur was a very nice bike, right below the Paramount in the Schwinn hierarchy. The frame should be double-butted chrome moly steel. The drops on a Voyageur are forged, not stamped plate, as was the case on lesser Schwinns.

    So to narrow the models down a bit do this:

    1) Look for forged drops front and rear and,
    2) Thump the top and down tubes with the nail side of your index finger.

    If the drops are forged and the tubes sound really thin, I think you may have a Voyageur. Or, you may possibly have a Le Tour 12.2, which was the weight of the bike in kilograms. Either bike is worthy of complete restoration!

    Let us know...

    Jason

  7. #7
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    schwinn headset removal

    I have a similar question. I bent the front fork on my old schwinn beach cruiser, and have purchased a replacement. I have the hex nut and knurled thingy unscrewed, but the headset (the part that holds the handlebars) won't come out. how is it fastened to the fork? is it just stuck in there? there was also an 8`` bolt in the top that I unscrewed also. but it is still stuck. I don't want to have to fix something else later, so please help. thanks
    Last edited by ferrari; 07-25-06 at 10:37 PM. Reason: clarification

  8. #8
    JRA...
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    rip sydney

  9. #9
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrari
    I have a similar question. I bent the front fork on my old schwinn beach cruiser, and have purchased a replacement. I have the hex nut and knurled thingy unscrewed, but the headset (the part that holds the handlebars) won't come out. how is it fastened to the fork? is it just stuck in there? there was also an 8`` bolt in the top that I unscrewed also. but it is still stuck. I don't want to have to fix something else later, so please help. thanks
    Thread the long bolt back in a good 6 turns or so, then tap it modestly with a hammer. This should un-wedge the stem's wedge that's holding it into the fork. Since it sounds like you're not familiar with how stems wedge into forks using the long bolt and the wedge at the other end of it, and because it's very important for your safety that the stem is properly assembled and fastened, I suggest that you have it checked for safety by a mechanic before you ride it. I'd point you to an online guide, except neither Park Tool nor Sheldon Brown seem to have this one illustrated.

  10. #10
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    *-- Instead of a hammer for unsticking stuck stems I use a rubber mallot. Don't like the idea of the shock from the hammer over and over again, especially on the bearings.

    The cups of the headset and all other bearings are pressed into the frame. You can just knock them out.

    It is important to get the cone thing tight when overhauling the headset (I've tried holding it by hand while tightening the lock nut before and have had it come loose).

    This is how I do it: I take a peice of rubber and wrap it around it, then clamp a big set of vice grips on tightly enough to hold it securely but loosly enough to avoid damage. I can then get the lock nut very tight without any slipping.

    If you do not have a vice grip that is big enough to lock around it, just use the biggest one you have and press the teeth tightly into the rubber without locking the mechinism, it will still hold far more securely than your hand.



    You can get rubber by cutting up old tubes. Actually old tube rubber is good for all sorts of applications.

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