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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 08-07-05, 09:33 PM   #1
anonymouse99
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Asphalt and rocks sticking to tire

I just came back from a long ride out on smooth asphalt roads through the cornfields of central Illinois. It was around noon and pretty hot and during the way back, I began to notice my rear tire making all kinds of sounds. I looked down and it was completely encrusted with asphalt, small rocks, and other miscellaneous debris. The tires are high pressure slicks I recently switched to, which have a little tread. Oddly enough the front tires were relatively fine, although they do have the pebble here or there. See the attached photo below.

Is there a way to prevent this? Is there a way to remedy this afterwords? If this is unavoidable due to the road type/temperature, should I switch to 100% slicks (no tread)?
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Old 08-07-05, 09:37 PM   #2
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Your rear is dirtier than the front because theres more weight on the back and the tire is flatter on the road.

It could just be that you ran into some tar that boiled out of the pavement, or brand new pavement. Or ran in a pool of soda. Or your tires are just really soft and sticky.
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Old 08-09-05, 01:50 PM   #3
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Rode around a bit expecting it to fall out by itself. Nope. Therefore, spent a good hour last night chiseling that s**t out with a small screw driver. Still couldn't get all of it out. Better than before, though. Definately tar.
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Old 08-09-05, 02:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse99
Is there a way to prevent this? Is there a way to remedy this afterwords? If this is unavoidable due to the road type/temperature, should I switch to 100% slicks (no tread)?
Depending upon the road surface, I have stuf like that sticking even to my road tires (no tread). I sometimes brush off the front while riding with my hand.

Last edited by LowCel; 04-06-07 at 08:31 AM.
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Old 08-09-05, 02:36 PM   #5
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I've also had the same problem riding through the central illinois cornfields. My mistake was riding on a freshly oiled/resurfaced road. After about 100-200 miles most of the debris fell off so my suggestion is just ride the stuff off. The debris didn't affect the bikes handling much although I was a little concerned when taking tight corners.
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Old 08-09-05, 02:37 PM   #6
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btw, my rear tire is 100% slick and I still had the same problem
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Old 08-09-05, 03:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse99
Is there a way to prevent this?
I've read somewhere too many years ago that the primary reason racers wore fingerless gloves was to keep grit off their tires. Ancient tires were far more prone to flating as opposed to new technology rubber.
Try pressing your palm of your hand on each tire while your are riding slowly and watch the grit scrape off.

Last edited by LowCel; 04-06-07 at 08:31 AM.
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Old 08-09-05, 04:31 PM   #8
robthebiker
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get new tires before you end up popping them
if too much crap gets in them they will pop
trust me i has happened to me in the past
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Old 08-10-05, 04:02 PM   #9
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Go ride in some dirt for a while and see if that helps. It may make one helluva mess also .
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