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  1. #1
    Senior Member transient's Avatar
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    clipless pedals: Any adjustments?

    I've got some Shimano M505's that came on my Giant NRS 3, but i'm having trouble getting out of the left side. The right is fine, but the left feels a little sticky. It's caused me to go down with the bike twice now.

    I was just wondering if there's any way to adjust the tension or anything like that so I can clip out easier?
    learn everything you can, while you still have the chance.

  2. #2
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    Look on the pedal for an adjustment?If it's there it should be marked +or-

  3. #3
    Senior Member transient's Avatar
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    Yeah, I guess I can't adjust them. They are the first clipless pedals i've used, so maybe I just need to take some more time to get used to them.
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    There should be a screw on both ends of each pedal.

  5. #5
    human velocipedio's Avatar
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    If I'm not mistaken, the PD-M505 is very similar to this year's PD-M515. You'll find the relevant adjustment info below. If you have the plastic cage plaform attached around the pedal, I think you'll have to remove it first.
    when walking, just walk. when sitting, just sit. when riding, just ride. above all, don't wobble.

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    Senior Member transient's Avatar
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    ahh, nice, thank you!

    Edit: Very nice, I got them set a little looser and I can get in and out really easily now. It'll still take some more getting used to, but hopefully I won't be going down with the ship as often now

    Btw, is there any good reason to have more tension on the pedals, or is it just personal preferance for the most part?
    Last edited by transient; 08-10-02 at 06:31 PM.
    learn everything you can, while you still have the chance.

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    Originally posted by transient
    Btw, is there any good reason to have more tension on the pedals, or is it just personal preferance for the most part?

    Well of course you dont want the pedals so loose that you unclip while pedaling. After you get past that point in tension.....its personal preference.

  8. #8
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    Try adjusting the plate on the bottom of your shoe, turning it slightly off centre will mean you have to move your foot less to release it from the clip

  9. #9
    Jubalayo Unogwaja! Bokkie's Avatar
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    Btw, is there any good reason to have more tension on the pedals, or is it just personal preferance for the most part?
    It's mostly personal but also depends on your riding style. If you are standing a lot, then a bit more tension will help. Too loose and you risk slipping off the pedal and gouging your calf or shin - take your choice, but either side bloody hurts.

    I once rode my road bike around Haywards Heath/Lewes and that was a few days before I converted to clipless. I got up a good head of steam, but found the clip straps I was using to be a bit loose. I pulled them tight, got up to speed again, and moments later I had to brake really hard. Of course, as I stopped, I found I had no free foot available and ended up on my ass. In front of a bunch of people who laugh at you, you feel a right bozo/dork! I couldn't get onto clipless fast enough, no matter what the tension was until I got it right.

  10. #10
    Senior Member transient's Avatar
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    I found I had no free foot available and ended up on my ass. In front of a bunch of people who laugh at you, you feel a right bozo/dork!
    hahaha, yeah, that's about what my experiences were. The good thing is, i've never fallen over while going fast. It's only when I come to a stop and find that I can't get my foot out in time, so it's just a really slow fall over to the left or the right
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  11. #11
    Veni, Vidi, Vomiti SteveE's Avatar
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    Originally posted by martin p
    Try adjusting the plate on the bottom of your shoe, turning it slightly off centre will mean you have to move your foot less to release it from the clip
    I have to strongly disagree here. If I read this correctly, Martin, you are saying to position the cleat/plate so your heel is skewed outward. Well, everyone's feet are different. Some folks feet are straight like this --- "| |", others are pigeon-toed like this --- "/ \", and others are slew-footed like this --- "\ /". If you try and adjust the cleat off-center in a way that is not natural to your normal foot-alignment, you are asking for problems later down the road. If your cleats are not aligned properly you will end up with tendonitis around the knee joint.

    The following works for me:

    Hop on a stationary bike that's set up with your pedals. It's also convenient to have an assistant to help you later to mark the position of the cleat. Position the cleat fore-and-aft so the ball of your foot is positioned directly over the pedal spindle. Tighten the cleat so it doesn't move backward or forward but allows you to move your heel in and out. (I use the Look-style cleat with 3-bolt pattern, so this isn?t difficult. I don't know if this is easy with Shimano pedals, tho'.) Get on the stationary bike and spin for at least 5 or more minutes and your legs will gravitate to the position that is most natural to them. Get your assistant to mark the cleat position before removing them from the pedals. Get off the bike and tighten the cleats in the position that was marked. Get back on the bike and spin again and make sure it still feels comfortable.
    "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ...'holy *****...what a ride!'"

  12. #12
    Senior Member transient's Avatar
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    Well, i've got my cleats pretty well dialed in right now, they're really comfortable when riding, it was just clipping out that was the problem.
    learn everything you can, while you still have the chance.

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    use some oil to lub your pedals also.

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