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  1. #1
    Nightrider Jared88's Avatar
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    Torque wench , worth it?

    I got my new aerobars which comes with tightening torques , but is it really worth it to buy a torque wench just to fix on my aerobars?

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    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    No joke!!! and this is the best one: www.sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip

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    Nightrider Jared88's Avatar
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    Its a little too funky for me , thanks for the useless info anyways

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    is slower than you Peek the Geek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jared88
    I got my new aerobars which comes with tightening torques , but is it really worth it to buy a torque wench just to fix on my aerobars?
    Do you do much of your own bike maintenance? If so, then a torque wrench is a good idea. It'll help you avoid problems in the long run. Careful if you're considering buying a Park, though. Park actually makes two different torque wrenches, each used for different torque ranges, and you'll have to buy both if you want to use a torque wrench on all your various parts. And figure in the cost of a set of hex bits, since those aren't included.

    On the other hand, if all you're doing is putting on a set of aerobars, then buying a torque wrench definitely wouldn't be worth it. If you're concerned about getting the correct torque, have a bike shop do it for a few bucks (or enlist the help of a wrench-equipped friend).
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  5. #5
    Nightrider Jared88's Avatar
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    I don't do any bike maintainence , just the usual adjustments like the seatpost etc. What kind of problems would i face if i don't use a torque wench on my aerobars?Thanks.

  6. #6
    is slower than you Peek the Geek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jared88
    I don't do any bike maintainence , just the usual adjustments like the seatpost etc. What kind of problems would i face if i don't use a torque wench on my aerobars?Thanks.
    If you're clamping them to a carbon bar, you might cause some damage by overtightening. But if your components are aluminum, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Proud supporter of the Chippewa Off-Road Bike Association (CORBA)
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    Nightrider Jared88's Avatar
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    I don't know what material my handlebars are made of. Seems like a AL-composite material that is rough to the touch. Would over-tightening do any damage to my aerobars?(the aerobars are Al)

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    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peek the Geek
    If you're clamping them to a carbon bar, you might cause some damage by overtightening. But if your components are aluminum, I wouldn't worry about it.
    There is still plenty to worry about for the mechanically disenfranchised.

  9. #9
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    I would love to have a torque WENCH, but I need to know how much she charges before I can tell you if it is worth it. All I have is a torque wrench and I find it to be invaluable, as the frustration of avoiding a stripped or broken fastener is worth quite a lot to me. Depends on how much repair work you do on bikes, cars, etc.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jared88
    What kind of problems would i face if i don't use a torque wench on my aerobars?Thanks.
    Obviously the torque wrench's job is to get the fastener as tight as possible without being too tight. There are certain areas in life where this is more critical than others. The need for the torque wrench is directly proportional to the amount of common sense you have and the how much you can afford to be hurt or damage something.

  11. #11
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    Ya know I think I bought my no-name cheap 'clicker' torque wrench for $15. They're cheap and easy to use.

    Torque values are quite important because it means you're either in danger of destroying the fastener or the item it's used on if you botch the job by varying from their precise specifications. If they specify a value, odds are they really mean it.
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    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CastIron

    Torque values are quite important because it means you're either in danger of destroying the fastener or the item it's used on if you botch the job by varying from their precise specifications. If they specify a value, odds are they really mean it.
    Once one gets their head out of their pocket protector one might be surprised at how far you can get with common sense and a bit of elbow calibratiion. But for them that are bankrupt in the necessary departments,a torque wrench might be a good bet.They aren't foolproof,as many a fool can attest.

  13. #13
    fmw
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    No joke!!! and this is the best one: www.sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip

    I liked the "real man" saddle the best.

  14. #14
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    I don't know what material my handlebars are made of.
    It seems you have a more fundamental problem than should you buy a torque wrench.

  15. #15
    34x25 FTW! oboeguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    No joke!!! and this is the best one: www.sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip
    Since April 1, 2001
    Heh.

    I don't even know what a torque wrench (or wench!) looks like and I know that link was a silly. What is a torque wrench, anyway? Something that measure how hard you've screwed-on (err, torqued) on a part? How do you know "how much" is needed anyway?
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    ...one might be surprised at how far you can get with common sense and a bit of elbow calibratiion.
    That "elbow calibration" can take a long time to develop and is particularly suspect for the new mechanic. I think nearly everyone is shocked by how much force getting crank arms and bottom bracket cups torqued to specification require. A lot of loose cranks and bottom brackets have happened because of poorly calibrated elbows. A lot of snapped 4 mm screws too. For the experienced mechanic, no problem. For the nooby, buy a torque wrench.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oboeguy
    Heh.

    I don't even know what a torque wrench (or wench!) looks like and I know that link was a silly. What is a torque wrench, anyway? Something that measure how hard you've screwed-on (err, torqued) on a part? How do you know "how much" is needed anyway?
    Particularly if you don't know what material you're about to crush.

    There is certainly a need for an instrument to measure how much some people screw up, though.

    For those parts that *have* torque specs, and for those whose feel for the bolt is lacking, yes, a torque wrench can help. Avoid the wench version, she's costly and an armful.

  18. #18
    Senior Member bison33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zouf
    Particularly if you don't know what material you're about to crush.

    There is certainly a need for an instrument to measure how much some people screw up, though.

    For those parts that *have* torque specs, and for those whose feel for the bolt is lacking, yes, a torque wrench can help. Avoid the wench version, she's costly and an armful.
    All bolts,nuts etc have a torque. If a torque for a certain thing isn't given.look at a general tq graph. Here's a link to park's site on Tq...good reading for those who think Torque is a movie...
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=88

  19. #19
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    I own a couple of torque wrenches that I use for motorcycle and car repair. I've never used a torque wrench to repair a bicycle.

    I once asked an old mechanic how much to tighten water pump bolts on a certain automobile. His answer: "1/4 turn before snap."

  20. #20
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    I did a lot of work on a lot of bikes for decades before I got my first torque wrench. Nothing ever broke and nobody ever died so I don't think they are an absolute necessity.

    Now I have two of them. I have one that I use just for cranks and bottom brackets and one that I use just for stems. I'd probably use my stem wrench on your aero bars just to make sure the clamp pressure is equalized.

    My experience has been that most guys, when left to their own judgement, undertorque cranks.

    High end stems tend to have torque specs that are way lower than I would have guessed so, if left to my own devices, I'd probably overtorque them. I've heard horror stories about botching a $100.00 stem install so a torque wrench can certainly come in handy. A torque wrench also helps equalize the clamp pressure if you are using a four bolt stem.

  21. #21
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oboeguy
    Heh.

    I don't even know what a torque wrench (or wench!) looks like and I know that link was a silly. What is a torque wrench, anyway? Something that measure how hard you've screwed-on (err, torqued) on a part? How do you know "how much" is needed anyway?
    Torque refersto the amount of force you are applying to the wrench. It'll vary depending on the length of the lever as well. A torque wrench is a fixed length and has some type (there are several) of means to indicate how much force you're applying in a standardized fashion. A 1/4 turn before breaking a bolt might be 1/40 of a turn on a 20" breaker versus a 2" stubby. With particularly soft or brittle materials (C.F. AL MG) this becomes quite important. On a cast iron water pump it probably won't matter a damn.
    Mike
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  22. #22
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    59.99: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...orque+Wrenches

    This is a Crasftsman Torque Wrench... there are some Beam type I have seen, maybe eBay?

  23. #23
    MADE IN HONG KONG
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    Luckily, I have 2 torque wrenches from motorcycle maintainance days. very useful on the bigger stuff like crank arm bolts. The smaller fasteners are by feel. Interestingly, once you use a torque wrench you get to improve your feel, which makes torque wrenches less important. So maybe barrow one and train your feel, then return it to you rbud.

    Just to cheese people off....remember to coat the fasteners b4 you torque.
    If you are not having any fun, it's all your fault

  24. #24
    TMX
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    That "elbow calibration" can take a long time to develop and is particularly suspect for the new mechanic. I think nearly everyone is shocked by how much force getting crank arms and bottom bracket cups torqued to specification require. A lot of loose cranks and bottom brackets have happened because of poorly calibrated elbows. A lot of snapped 4 mm screws too. For the experienced mechanic, no problem. For the nooby, buy a torque wrench.
    To quote an old Car Craft article from at least twenty years ago, "if you think you were born with a calibrated wrist, you are sorely mistaken".

    While it's certainly possible - with experience - to get a feel for when you are about to tighten something beyond the breaking/stripping point, I've yet to see anybody who can accurately ballpark a given torque specification while working blind.

    -Bob

  25. #25
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    Once one gets their head out of their pocket protector one might be surprised at how far you can get with common sense and a bit of elbow calibratiion. But for them that are bankrupt in the necessary departments,a torque wrench might be a good bet.They aren't foolproof,as many a fool can attest.
    What would Freud say about Sydney?


    When I picked up my custom fork for our tandem, the engineer that built it (yes, he contracts to NASA) showed me which bolts need to be torqued to what spec. Too loose, possibly compromise our safety. Tighten too much, and break some really expensive machined pieces. A properly calibrated and applied torque wrench is a smart investment. Those people that truly believe in elbow calibration are only fooling themselves.

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