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Old 09-13-05, 12:11 PM   #1
rufvelo
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You ride more carefully with a carbon fork?

Do you consiously ride more carefully with a carbon fork or with the same relative abandon that you do with aluminum? Just curious about carbon fork lifespan, especially all carbon, as opposed to carbon with aluminum steerer.

Thanks.
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Old 09-13-05, 12:34 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by rufvelo
Do you consiously ride more carefully with a carbon fork or with the same relative abandon that you do with aluminum? Just curious about carbon fork lifespan, especially all carbon, as opposed to carbon with aluminum steerer.

Thanks.
NO! And mine was steel.

If you can't accept that the equipment you ride - in most cases, and in general - can handle what you can do to it, you should probably not be riding it.

The pros ride all combinations of what is available on the market. They routinely apply two to four times the power, sometimes six or seven, that I can to it. For much longer "rides" than I do. They hardly ever break anything.

I feel pretty safe with mine.
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Old 09-13-05, 12:36 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rufvelo
Do you consiously ride more carefully with a carbon fork or with the same relative abandon that you do with aluminum? Just curious about carbon fork lifespan, especially all carbon, as opposed to carbon with aluminum steerer.

Thanks.
Nope, hammer hard no matter what. Got 4 bikes all with carbon forks. Only issue I have seen (not with me) is where a fork's magnesium dropouts started coming unbonded from the fork leg, but the mfg (Klein)took care of the replacement. While pros might go through a couple of bikes per year, there are tons of local racers riding hard with the same frame/fork year after year with no problem.
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Old 09-13-05, 01:13 PM   #4
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I ride a cannondale t400 alum with steel forks. i plan on going full carbon or carbon alum soon. Ill likly ride harder with the carbon fork. The way i see it fork is something that is a sacraficable part (seen forks from nashbar for 60 or less). I see it this way i hit a big arse pot hole or other road hazard hard enough to snap something id rather my fork break than have my frame trashed. Yes my bike is old but to replace a frame that got broken would be more than replacing even a 200+ dolor fork.
Shoot who knows fork breaking might even save my rim dont know about lessoning my injuries from a wreck hard enough to snap the fork but still. Least my bike will be cheaper to get back on the road.
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Old 09-13-05, 01:20 PM   #5
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Thanks.

I also asked because I noticed a lot of Euro pros (especially in the Tour) did not use carbon handlebars. Probably the mechanics had the last say here Example they'd use Ritchey WCS aluminum components, or FSA aluminum stem instead of FSA carbon stem. I guess if you fall or drop the bike, unlike other exposed carbon components, for visual inspection you'd have to unwrap the bars , check and then wrap them again?
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Old 09-13-05, 04:39 PM   #6
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The way i see it fork is something that is a sacraficable part (seen forks from nashbar for 60 or less). I see it this way i hit a big arse pot hole or other road hazard hard enough to snap something id rather my fork break than have my frame trashed.

I don't think I agree with this philosophy. I can't think of anything more serious or more likely to cause major injury than a fork failure.

As to longevity, carbon is at least as durable as aluminum and probably a lot more.
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Old 09-13-05, 05:22 PM   #7
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I always ride my pinarello more carefully than my $100 commuter bianchi, even though the only thing stronger on the bianchi than on the pinarello is the paint

The difference is that if I descend a flight of stairs on my bianchi, replacement wheels will cost me $0 from the nearest abandoned bike, while replacing the wheels on my pinarello would be like $500
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Old 09-13-05, 05:48 PM   #8
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would you hop curbs in the city with a carbon fork?
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Old 09-13-05, 05:52 PM   #9
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How carefully I ride has nothing to do with the fork (or frame) and everything to do with the operator's health.

Al
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