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Old 09-13-05, 10:59 PM   #1
sirshane13
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130 mm dropout spacing?

Greetings,

I want to do a custom build with a mix of a classic steel frame and fork but new-ish (but certainly not DA or Record!) components. Just something classy.

Is it true that I can get a 10-speed on any 10-speed compatible hub, 130 mm dropout spacing?

And the real question is, what was the approximate (or exact!) year that 130 mm spacings became standard for road frames?

thanks in advance~

sL
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Old 09-14-05, 08:22 AM   #2
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For Shimano, 10-speed cassettes will fit any 8,9 or 10-speed hub. The exception is 10-speed Dura Ace hubs will only take 10-speed cassettes.

For Campy, 9-speed hubs will also take their 10-speed cassettes.

I don't know exactly when 130 mm dropout spacing became "standard" but my 1992 Trek 1420 came with something like 128 mm spacing so either a 126 mm or 130 mm hub will fit. That frame, in different model designations, came with 7-speed (126 mm) 105 components or 8-speed (130 mm) Ultegra that year so 130 mm stuff was available in 1992 or before.
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Old 09-14-05, 10:19 AM   #3
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As far as build kits go, Shimano Ultegra or Campy Centaur are both excellent mid range groups. For a little less try the Campy Veloce 10 speed. It is not much different from the Centaur and several hundred less. You won't notice the difference once it's on your bike. Try Gary V Hobbs for the kit. He is the only dealer that stocks lower level build kits. Everyone else stops at Chorus & Ultegra. Good Luck
http://www.gvhbikes.com/kits.html

Tim
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Old 09-14-05, 10:43 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirshane13
what was the approximate (or exact!) year that 130 mm spacings became standard for road frames?
130 came in with 8-speed in 1989 Dura-Ace. The earliest Dura-Ace 8-speed hubs had locknuts with angled edges to make it easier to fit a 130 mm hub into an existing 126 mm frame.

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Old 09-14-05, 09:00 PM   #5
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thanks to all for the responses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
I don't know exactly when 130 mm dropout spacing became "standard" but my 1992 Trek 1420 came with something like 128 mm spacing so either a 126 mm or 130 mm hub will fit.
I've heard this - but there's something eerie about "stretching" (in either direction) the dropouts in order to accommodate a hub spacing that differs. Is this really safe for the integrity of the rear triangle?

I'd probably take a nice, classy lugged steel frame and put some Chorus (hopefully 10-Speed) alloy on it. Just thinking about it makes me smile.

I'm currently riding a Habanero Titanium with Centaur 10 (so much fun).
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Old 09-15-05, 03:29 AM   #6
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yeah, it's fine. Under riding stresses of sprinting and climbing, you'll be flexing that rear triangle from side to side over 5mm in either direction anyway. I had one really flexible alloy frame that had enough flex in the rear end that the tyre would rub on both chainstays in a sprint.
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Old 09-15-05, 09:54 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirshane13
...there's something eerie about "stretching" (in either direction) the dropouts in order to accommodate a hub spacing that differs. Is this really safe for the integrity of the rear triangle?

I'd probably take a nice, classy lugged steel frame and put some Chorus (hopefully 10-Speed) alloy on it. Just thinking about it makes me smile.
With a steel frame it's a trivial matter.

See: http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing

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Old 09-15-05, 10:46 AM   #8
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For what it's worth -

Excel Sports also does Centaur and Veloce build kits:

http://www.excelsports.com/new.asp?p...ajor=1&minor=2
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Old 09-15-05, 01:00 PM   #9
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Hi,

You should also check out totalcycling.com. I just bought:

-Veloce 10-speed brifters
-Veloce 10-speed rear derailleur
-Veloce double chainset
-Centaur bottom bracket
-Centaur braze-on front derailleur
-Connex 10-speed master chain link

all for $399, Canadian! It cost $35ca for shipping, and I got dinged $23ca for customs. I already had brakes, chain and Campy wheels, so I didn't need to buy the whole groupset. A full Veloce kit goes for about $545ca. Killer value, quick delivery.

Cheers,
J.
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Old 09-15-05, 07:18 PM   #10
sirshane13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
With a steel frame it's a trivial matter.

See: http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing

Sheldon "Malleability" Brown
Hmm. That was a very useful article, thanks. Then this begs the question: how narrow can/should I go in order to open up my options for steel frames? And are there any alloys of steel I should avoid?
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Old 09-15-05, 07:29 PM   #11
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...there's something eerie about "stretching" (in either direction) the dropouts in order to accommodate a hub spacing that differs. Is this really safe for the integrity of the rear triangle?


Apparently it was also a trivial problem for the bonded Al Treks. Mine has 20,000+ miles on it with no signs of distress.
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