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Thread: Bicycle Tools??

  1. #1
    Junior Member bill_me_l8r's Avatar
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    Bicycle Tools??

    I just bought a new road bike and am wondering what I need in the way of tools. I bought a Park multi-tool, but have been thinking that I might be better off with a small assortment of individual tools. Opinions?!? I would mainly be looking for something in case of a break down on the road for now. My LBS offers mechanic classes that I hope to look into in the future.


    I also already have a spare tube, CO2 pump and seat pack for road repairs.

    :confused:

  2. #2
    Mr. Cellophane RainmanP's Avatar
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    If you are talking about general maintenance and repair at home, yes, you will do much better with individual tools. There was a thread on this just a few weeks ago, maybe the one on building a bike or there might have been one specifically on basic tools. Scan back a couple of months on this forum.
    If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!

  3. #3
    NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS! a2psyklnut's Avatar
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    Let me start by saying, my bro-in-law calls me the "pack mule" whenever we go riding together because I bring so much cr@p in my camelbak.

    For mt. bike rides, I bring in my Camelbak:

    A spare tube
    A patch kit
    A folding allen wrech (2,3,4,5,6,&8)(I think!-Home Depot tool!)
    A multi-tool (flat, phillips, knife, scissors, file, & pliers)
    A chain tool (Park mini)
    A spoke wrench (Work Force - 4 size)
    A spare crank bolt
    A couple of spare links and pins (taped over using clear packing tape)
    A bunch of zip ties
    A mini-pump

    I also take some black duct tape and put about 5 or 6 wraps around my seatpost (the exposed part). It keeps it straight and is easy to get to if I need some in an emergency.
    (Duct tape has a bunch of uses - but is great for a sidewall puncture, and for holding a bandage on for first aide!)

    For my road rides:

    1 spare tube
    1 patch kit
    1 mini-pump mounted below water bottle cage.
    1 mini tool (Pedro's)
    1 $5 bill.
    4 quarters

    I figure if my of my problems are flats, or bolts loosening up and the mini-tool fixes that.

    The $5 is for emergency food intake (bonk induced!) (No Bokkie, not that type of Bonk!)

    The quarters are for calling for a ride if anything else goes wrong!

    L8R
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
    "Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger

  4. #4
    pnj
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    it sure is nice to have the tool you need when your 10 miles from your car eh?

    as for what tools to buy, I would take the classes at your LBS and buy what they suggest.

    most classes focus on a few things at a time such as brakes and derailers.
    there are specific tools for those, so buy those tools at that time.


    it depends on how indepth you want to get in your repair jobs. some things i let the LBS do because i don't have the tool. such as removing a cassette. I don't do it often enough to justifie the purchase.

    the LBS will help you get your basic tool kit together. it may be cheaper to buy them elsewhere though

    allen wrenches
    open ended cone wrenches
    tire iron
    long nose plyers
    etc...
    4130

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    Buy the Zinn book.It's got maintenance and tools.

  6. #6
    human velocipedio's Avatar
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    If you plan to do anything with wheels and drivetrain, you will certainly need a chain tool, a chainwhip and a cassette lockring tool in addition to a full set of metric allen wrenches. You should also have a spoke wrench [for fixing wobbles -- use your bike as a truing stand], and a pedal wrench.

    That's to start. Think of this as a lifelong process of accumulating bicycle tools.
    when walking, just walk. when sitting, just sit. when riding, just ride. above all, don't wobble.

    The Irregular Cycling Club of Montreal
    Cycling irregularly since 2002

  7. #7
    Junior Member bill_me_l8r's Avatar
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    Has anyone ever heard of Aireon bicycle tools. I found a complete set on Supergo's website for $44.95.

    Can be seen here:
    http://www.supergo.com/itemdisplay.a...579&subid=7573

    I know that they aren't the same quality as Park tools, but would they be sufficient for someone not using them every day.

  8. #8
    Scooby Snax
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    bill_me_l8r,

    Ah, my pet peeve...

    As a tradesman, (Toolfreek will hopefully back me up here...) A cheap tool is just that, cheap.

    You don't need to go and buy a set of tools, just the few that you are comfortable using now.

    Just remember, long after the low price is forgotten the quality remains... or, when it breaks you will bleed, at which point you'll forget what a bargain you got.

  9. #9
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Get good tools There are far worse things to spend money on! Some good things to have, and I realize most of them have been suggested already:

    small chain tool
    crank extractor
    cassette lockring tool
    chain whip
    cone wrenches
    axle vise
    headset wrenches, if you have a threaded headset
    cartridge bottom bracket tool
    pedal wrench
    folding hex-key set
    spoke wrenches
    high-quality cable cutter

    and perhaps a repair stand, a repair manual, and maybe a wheel-truing stand if you want to spoil yourself Virtue is its own reward, and nice tools likewise. Park Tool's stuff is generally worth paying extra over the generic-ish stuff IMHO.

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