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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 09-18-05, 06:49 PM   #1
sweetfracture3
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Newbie

Hey guys, I'm new to cycling - just bought my first road bike a little over a month ago. I've been riding about a 12-15 mile loop for a few weeks. I'd like to start doing longer rides, but I don't really want to get to far from home with out the necassary tools to fix any problems I could encounter on a ride.

I know absolutely nothing about bike maintenance, but I'd definatly like to learn. I'm a aircraft electrician in the Air Force Reserve, so I have some mechanical ability. Anyway, what are the basic tools I need to begin learning to fix my own bike. Also, are they any particular books that I should look into reading?

Thanks for the help.
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Old 09-18-05, 07:05 PM   #2
neil0502
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You may want to take a few minutes and search the forum for things like "tools," "maintenance," "multi-tool," and "books." You'll find lots of good info that way, as these subjects come up quite frequently.

Also, it will help a bit to know what kind of bike you're riding, and with what components, so that--when you have specific questions, people can give you more detailed guidance.

Best,
Neil
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Old 09-18-05, 08:01 PM   #3
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Sheldon Brown is a bicycle guru with a very informative, extensive, and well-written website, He often posts here too. Check his website at www.sheldonbrown.com.

If they've made a newer version (I have one from the 70's), Ballantine's Bicycle Book is a great resource.

For long rides, you want a patch kit, a pump, tire levers, metric allen keys, and a lightweight adjustable wrench, or maybe a 3way socket wrench (8, 9, 10 mm).
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Old 09-18-05, 08:07 PM   #4
georgiaboy
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This book is one of the most widely used and repected books on bicycle repair.



To purchase:
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=3943376
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Old 09-18-05, 09:30 PM   #5
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Practice taking off abd reinstalling the tire and tube in the comfort of your home before you go on a long ride. Then you will find it a lot easier when you get a flat on the road. On second thoughts - practice now because you can still get flats close to home. Replacing a tube is easier than fixing a flat at the side of the road.
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