Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-02-05, 08:26 PM   #1
jharte
Long Live Long Rides
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: KCMO
Bikes: 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp, converted for touring/commuting. 1984 Raleigh Team USA road bike.
Posts: 717
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Teflon coated or Not

I'm getting ready to replace the shifter cables on my commuter. Anyone use teflon coated cables? Or teflon sleeved housing? In the past I've dipped my new cable in hot wax before installing. However, over the years, I've wondered if the teflon coated cables would stand up to the hazzards of winter and rain.

Any ideas would be great. Thanks!
jharte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-05, 08:35 PM   #2
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Casing is plastic lined.That and a bit of light lube cuts thru alot of extra cost and hassle.
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-05, 08:40 PM   #3
enduro_phreak
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I recommend the Avid Flak Jacket cables and cable housing. You get cables, cable housing and cable sleeves which protect the exposed cables. I believe they are Teflon-coated but am not certain. I use this system on my mountain bike and it works very well. You end up with no exposed cables and so you don't have to worry too much about grit and dirt getting into the housing. I would imagine that the cable runs are not that different for commuter bikes from mountain bikes and that you should be okay using it for a commuter.
enduro_phreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-05, 08:55 PM   #4
jharte
Long Live Long Rides
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: KCMO
Bikes: 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp, converted for touring/commuting. 1984 Raleigh Team USA road bike.
Posts: 717
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Enduro Phreak, that looks like what I need. Actually my commuter IS an old mountain bike (Specialized Rockhopper Comp) converted. I'm hoping I can find one local tomorrow. It sucks to have to drive.
jharte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 08:32 AM   #5
Nessism
Senior Member
 
Nessism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Bikes: Homebuilt steel
Posts: 2,333
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Many of the "coated" cables on the market use a cheap carbon steel inner wire that will start to rust as soon as the coating wears off. Better cables use stainless steel wire that will not rust no matter what. Better still are "slick" cables which have a machined surface to reduce friction.

Shimano and Campy inject grease inside the cable casing to lube the cables. Why over think this whole lubrication issue? Just do what the pros do and be done with it.

Ed
__________________
Becareful buying/selling bike parts on-line. I learned the hard way. :(

Good/Bad Trader Listing
Nessism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 08:40 AM   #6
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessism
Many of the "coated" cables on the market use a cheap carbon steel inner wire that will start to rust as soon as the coating wears off. Better cables use stainless steel wire that will not rust no matter what. Better still are "slick" cables which have a machined surface to reduce friction.

Shimano and Campy inject grease inside the cable casing to lube the cables. Why over think this whole lubrication issue? Just do what the pros do and be done with it.

Ed
sydney got the 'heads up' from an eXpert here that stainless cable will corrode on the inside and swell up and hose shifting, and that is why 'coated' cable is beter.Suppose it's BW?
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 01:22 PM   #7
yotool
Humble Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Bikes:
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Stainless Steel will "Corrode and Swell up" - from what, that highly concentrated hydrofluoric (or hydrochloric) acid you have a nasty habit of injecting into your cable housings before every ride????

What is this one based on?

Maybe I misinterpreted the "smiley face"....

I agree with the "Shimano" design thoughts, quality stainless inner cables, properly greased and maintained, with lined housings [maybe Shimano's are not lined or only derraileur housings are can't remember]...

Last edited by yotool; 10-03-05 at 03:01 PM.
yotool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 06:41 PM   #8
rmfnla
Senior Member
 
rmfnla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: La La Land (We love it!)
Bikes: Gilmour road, Curtlo road; both steel (of course)
Posts: 6,278
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessism
Why over think this whole lubrication issue? Just do what the pros do and be done with it.
Yeah, just toss it to your team mechanic and let him/her worry about it.

__________________
Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...
rmfnla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 08:40 PM   #9
Nessism
Senior Member
 
Nessism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Bikes: Homebuilt steel
Posts: 2,333
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmfnla
Yeah, just toss it to your team mechanic and let him/her worry about it.

Too many people agrue that: cables should not be lubed, use thin lube like tri-flow, use wax, ect. I say use what the designers intended, grease.
__________________
Becareful buying/selling bike parts on-line. I learned the hard way. :(

Good/Bad Trader Listing
Nessism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 08:49 PM   #10
MtbVA
TreadHead
 
MtbVA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Norfolk, VA
Bikes: '95 Klein Pulse, '98 Klein Pulse [Single Speed], Mosh (Gaint) 24" bmx cruiser
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I like Teflon cables, they feel smoother. The coating will wear off at contact points over time. I've only used the cheaper ones though.

I just installed some avid flak jacket shifter cables (the cable are not coated), it's a sealed system thanks to the cable end caps with nipples, the cable housing is good, should last since it's a sealed system.

I also just put on some power link brake cables; it has an outer tube with a lot of individual links with an inner shield that the cable feeds through from start to end. Can't really notice any improvement over normal cable housing, but it does look different.

I think any good cable, expensive or not, work well as long as dirt is kept out. Cheap cable actually feels rougher due to cable material, thicker strands, &/or wind, the rougher it feels the more the friction in the cable housing.
Cable housing can make a big difference, get a good cable housing.
I don't like a cable housing with a spiral shield, it's hard to get a clean cut with cutters. I like housing with a wire shield, they seem the flex smoother.
MtbVA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-05, 09:27 PM   #11
seely
The Rabbi
 
seely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,088
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
For a commuter, the ONLY way to go is full housing, front to back. Even if your stops don't allow it, I would still rig it up with zip ties or clip on cable guides. All the fancy cable systems out there don't mean a thing, they all wear out in about the same time.

Some of the worst shifting performance I ever had in my life was on my Avid Flakjacket stuff. There is nothing special about it. Its just cable and endcaps like any other cable/housing package. I tore the stuff off my Stumpjumper after 3 months and went to bulk cable/housing and never had a problem since.
seely is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-05, 07:23 AM   #12
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessism
Too many people agrue that: cables should not be lubed, use thin lube like tri-flow, use wax, ect. I say use what the designers intended, grease.
Well, there is lighter and heavier grease, and folks wonder why their shifters don't workee so good when it gets really cold.
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-05, 07:26 AM   #13
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by seely
For a commuter, the ONLY way to go is full housing, front to back. Even if your stops don't allow it, I would still rig it up with zip ties or clip on cable guides. All the fancy cable systems out there don't mean a thing, they all wear out in about the same time.

Some of the worst shifting performance I ever had in my life was on my Avid Flakjacket stuff. There is nothing special about it. Its just cable and endcaps like any other cable/housing package. I tore the stuff off my Stumpjumper after 3 months and went to bulk cable/housing and never had a problem since.
Always worked for old dim bulb sydney, but it isn't there a theory that if you pay more it's gotta be better?? Maybe it works better for muppets?
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-05, 09:39 PM   #14
antiquebiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The trouble for me with teflon coated (and I used them long ago) was that they added a fair amount of "stretchiness" to the shifting making it less deterministic. The bare wire against a metal housing has a very crisp shifting behavior in comparison.

This is the main benefit of steel on steel with lubricant.
antiquebiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-05, 07:09 AM   #15
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquebiker
The trouble for me with teflon coated (and I used them long ago) was that they added a fair amount of "stretchiness" to the shifting making it less deterministic. The bare wire against a metal housing has a very crisp shifting behavior in comparison.

This is the main benefit of steel on steel with lubricant.
Current casing is plastic lined.And pretty sure it has been since STI/Ergo came along. FWIW, any teflon cable coating would add nothing to 'stretchiness' of the cable anyway.
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-05, 02:15 AM   #16
duckliondog
Senior Member
 
duckliondog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Diego
Bikes: Cinelli Unica, BP Stealth, K2 Razorback, Steel Bianchi roadie, Bianchi Super GL, Specialized Stumpjumper, and 3 beach cruisers
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquebiker
The trouble for me with teflon coated (and I used them long ago) was that they added a fair amount of "stretchiness" to the shifting making it less deterministic. The bare wire against a metal housing has a very crisp shifting behavior in comparison.
What's so great about shifting being deterministic? Do our gears not deserve to have free will?

I haven't used teflon cables for shifting yet, but I do like them for brakes. I used bulk brake housing for my shifter cables when I last overhauled my mountain bike. It's steel on steel, like you said, and it does feel pretty snappy. I want Aztecs though, those look awesome.
duckliondog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-05, 06:55 AM   #17
sydney
Senior Member
 
sydney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 9,428
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
^^^...Even the cheap bulk brake housing I buy is plastic lined. Bulk deralier housing cost the same so why use an infeior and incorrect product for shift casing?
sydney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-05, 03:53 PM   #18
duckliondog
Senior Member
 
duckliondog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Diego
Bikes: Cinelli Unica, BP Stealth, K2 Razorback, Steel Bianchi roadie, Bianchi Super GL, Specialized Stumpjumper, and 3 beach cruisers
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used it becuase I had a six feet of it left over from doing my brakes. It works better than the nasty old housing was working.
duckliondog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-05, 12:42 AM   #19
Raiyn
I drink your MILKSHAKE
 
Raiyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR Comp, 1999 Specialized Hardrock Comp FS, 1971 Schwinn Varsity
Posts: 15,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been using teflon cables for both the brakes and shifters on my commuter for the last two years without incident or malfunction. I use bulk roll lined shifter housing and teflon lined brake housing in conjunction with the teflon coated cables.
__________________
Raiyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:08 AM.