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  1. #1
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    Clockwise to tighten a spoke?

    I haven't done this before, and I don't want to assume - when using a spoke wrench - clockwise to tighten, counter-clockwise to loosen (righty-tighty/lefty-loosey)?

    Details - Specialized Roubaix - Rims are ALX 290 EXA 622 x 14.

    Many Thanks - GR

  2. #2
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenRiver
    .. when using a spoke wrench - clockwise to tighten, counter-clockwise to loosen (righty-tighty/lefty-loosey)?
    Many Thanks - GR

    Yes, the spoke nipples are right hand thread (clockwise to tighten), but you need to make sure you are viewing from the correct point of view.

    As you look from the tire towards the head of the nipple, yes - clockwise to tighten.

  3. #3
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    While we're on the subject, where on the average bike would one find "opposite threaded" connections. There's the left pedal, I know that one. Anywhere else?

  4. #4
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    well.... it depends upon whether you're looking down at a spoke, looking up at a spoke or looking sideways at a spoke...

    the "right-hand rule" works well for figuring out which direction to turn. Grab the spoke in the palm of your right hand with your thumb aimed in the direction you want the nipple to turn. Towards the hub to tighten, away from the hub to loosen. Your fingers will wrap around the spoke in the direction you want to turn the nipple.

    Sometimes it will aim "left" to tighten, other times it will aim "right" to tighten..

  5. #5
    Senior Member Matt Gaunt's Avatar
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    If you look at the wheel from the hub down, then it actually appears that you tighten by turning anti-clockwise. Like this: http://www.mtbbritain.co.uk/trail_fix_wheel_truing.html
    Matt
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenRiver
    I haven't done this before, and I don't want to assume - when using a spoke wrench - clockwise to tighten, counter-clockwise to loosen (righty-tighty/lefty-loosey)?

    Details - Specialized Roubaix - Rims are ALX 290 EXA 622 x 14.

    Many Thanks - GR
    Imagine using a screwdriver to tighten the nipple from the underside of the rim. Righty-tighty the screwdriver. Now tighten the nipple the same direction from the top of the rim using the spoke wrench.

  7. #7
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    If you're looking down at the nipple, aiming the screwdriver up at the nipple, you'd be turning counter-clockwise, or left to tighten. Most people would be looking down at the nipple and not spin the wheel up to figure out the direction of turn. If you're looking down at the nipple, like on a truing stand, it would be lefty-tighty and righty-loosey...

  8. #8
    Tom (ex)Builder twahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surly98
    While we're on the subject, where on the average bike would one find "opposite threaded" connections. There's the left pedal, I know that one. Anywhere else?
    Also the right side of the bottom bracket.
    Tom

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by surly98
    While we're on the subject, where on the average bike would one find "opposite threaded" connections. There's the left pedal, I know that one. Anywhere else?
    A cog lockring on a track or fixed-gear road bike.
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