Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Davis CA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
    Posts
    3,954
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Front hub. Did I do this right?

    It was making a noise. And was a little loose.

    Took it apart. Liberally put some grease all over and around the bearings. it. Tightened it. Oops, too tight. loosened it and figured out how a cone wrench works. Got is just right.

    Noise gone. No more wobble.

    I know this is no substitute for replacing the bearings, but it's my beater bike that I traded a couch for in 1992. It was old then.

  2. #2
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Davis CA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
    Posts
    3,954
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What I mean is can I ride the bike around and not worry about the front wheel freezing up or falling off?

  3. #3
    53 miles per burrito urban_assault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Trek 1000, Iron Horse Rogue
    Posts
    1,486
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds good to me.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Between the mountains and the lake.
    My Bikes
    8 bikes - one for each day of the week!
    Posts
    16,745
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it spins smooth with no wobbling, you did good. Check the Park Tools website to verify your handiwork.

  5. #5
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,986
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MrCjolsen
    It was making a noise. And was a little loose.

    Took it apart. Liberally put some grease all over and around the bearings. it. Tightened it. Oops, too tight. loosened it and figured out how a cone wrench works. Got is just right.

    Noise gone. No more wobble.

    I know this is no substitute for replacing the bearings, but it's my beater bike that I traded a couch for in 1992. It was old then.
    Sounds good. A couple of things I'd do is to put a little (and I mean a little) play back in the adjustment if it has a quick release. The quick release will tighten up the bearings when it's forced into place and this can bind the wheel a little bit. Not a big problem really but a little play in the bearings will take care of it.

    The other thing to do is to tighten the cones against the lock nut. This keeps them from working loose later.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    My Bikes
    '13 Felt Z5, '13 Giant Anthem 29er, '05 Specialized Sirrus, 2014 Stolen Saint 24
    Posts
    218
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Works for me, but bearings are so cheap it's silly not to replace when you've got the hub apart.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    24,008
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    The other thing to do is to tighten the cones against the lock nut. This keeps them from working loose later.
    BINGO! Adjusting cones is one thing. Getting them to stay adjusted is something else.

  8. #8
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Davis CA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
    Posts
    3,954
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    The other thing to do is to tighten the cones against the lock nut. This keeps them from working loose later.
    Is that the part where I was holding my cone wrench in one hand and the ordinary adjustable wrench in the other?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Between the mountains and the lake.
    My Bikes
    8 bikes - one for each day of the week!
    Posts
    16,745
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes.

    [edit] That's the part where you need to put down your beer.

  10. #10
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norman, Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Pinarello Prince, 1980's 531 steel fixie commuter, FrankenMTB
    Posts
    1,896
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriate
    Yes.

    [edit] That's the part where you need to put down your beer.

    not true. if you have a bottle, you can hold it in your mouth, and occasionally tip your head back for a swig.

    When empty, swing head to side and let bottle fly. yell for another.


    Next time, insist to your friend that he clamp the freaking bookshelf, even if it's only 20 minutes, and even if you can watch TV and drink his beer.
    Weather today: Hot. Humid. Potholes.

  11. #11
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,986
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MrCjolsen
    Is that the part where I was holding my cone wrench in one hand and the ordinary adjustable wrench in the other?
    Yes (although you should use a real wrench and not a metric adapter ). Get the adjustment to where you want it and maybe just a little tight (a little, a squidge, a smidgen. Not so tight the wheel won't turn.). Then, holding the wrench on the lock nut and the cone wrench on the cone (on one side of the hub), back the cone out against the lock nut. This will lock them in place (don't go to far) and keep them from working loose. Do it to both sides and in the future only take the cones off one side so that you don't have to mess with both sides. I usually do the non-drive side because resetting the cones on the drive side of the rear is a pain.

    When you are done, check to see if you have the proper amount of free rotation and a little play in the bearings. If you do, go ride. If not, do it again until you are either satisfied or completely frustrated
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  12. #12
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,522
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think, but don't quote me, that you have to be especially careful to lock the cone and nut on the left side, since the ball action while riding will tend to cause that cone to screw inwards, away from the locknut. On the right, the balls will tend to tighten the cone outwards against the locknut. The splined (not sure if that is the correct term) washer between the cone and locknut prevents the torque on the cone being transferred to the locknut, so they won't both unscrew.
    R

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •