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  1. #1
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    Newbie Replacing Pedals

    I've got a pair of pedals I want to put on my Road bike (Campy cranks), but I have neither a stand nor the specialized wrench as the Park Tools Repair website suggests. Is there any way I can do it without these things...any homespun suggestions on this?

    Beyond this - if I can get there- is there a difference between Lube and grease?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ferrous wheel
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    Lube goes on a chain; grease goes on bearings and threaded parts.

    You might be able to install the pedals from the inside of the crank with an allen wrench. A stand isn't really necessary for the job.
    One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach -- all the damn vampires.

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    Ride for Life wearyourtruth's Avatar
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    yeah some pedals have allen holes on the inside.

    otherwise, obviously park tools is going to suggest using specialized tools, that's what they sell. i switched my pedals out for a while with a wrench i got from my grandfather, any wrench that is the right size will work fine, i took this one because it was thin, you can't use a wrench that's too fat or it won't fit.
    before posting, a "noob" should always ask themselves "could this have been answered by first visiting Sheldon Brown

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    15mm wrench

  5. #5
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    Great, thanks - I'll get to it shortly. I'm tired of going to the lbs for everything.

    BTW, any recommendations on grease? I don't have grease around, just chain lube. Crisco, maybe?

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    Wheel bearing grease, any auto parts store. Crisco is great in black powder revolvers but I've never tried it on pedal threads.

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    Many pedals have wrench flats wide enough to trake a regular 15 mm open end wrench. Remember the left (non-drive side) pedal is left-hand threaded so it comes off the reverse of normal. A useful rule is to put the wrench so the handle is sticking up. Then both pedals loosen by pushing the handle toward the rear of the bike

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    Many pedals have wrench flats wide enough to trake a regular 15 mm open end wrench. Remember the left (non-drive side) pedal is left-hand threaded so it comes off the reverse of normal. A useful rule is to put the wrench so the handle is sticking up. Then both pedals loosen by pushing the handle toward the rear of the bike
    Also remember that your chainrings can make your fingers bleed like a mother. Put your chain on the outer ring prior to starting. This avoids the inevitable blood trail if your wrench slips.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Nubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliB
    Great, thanks - I'll get to it shortly. I'm tired of going to the lbs for everything.

    BTW, any recommendations on grease? I don't have grease around, just chain lube. Crisco, maybe?

    Crisco is for pastry. Although it might be worth a try...

    Better yet, get a tube of white lithium grease from your local hardware store for about $2-3. I got mine at Ace Hardware - it's in a white toothpaste-like tube and says "Panef White Lithium Grease."

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    By and large many bike repair tools are relatively inexpensive. Nashbar has a pedal wrench for only $9.99. The thing about having the right tool for the right job, is that there is less chance for scratching, breaking, rounding off, or otherwise buggering up your bike parts.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...eid=&pagename=

    Bob

  11. #11
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    Also comes in a tub. About $3 bucks at any hardware store.

  12. #12
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
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    Just remember:

    1) direction of threads (RH on the right-pedal, LH on the left-pedal)
    2) lightly grease the threads before assembly

    I replaced some pedals which had been on a bike since the early 1980s - having the correct wrench helped enormously, but this device was absolutely essential…
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Much ado about nothing. Real simple, as you all implied. I had to use my adjustable wrench to tighten as the nuts on new pedals were a size up from the flat 15mm wrench I purchased.

    One more question - perhaps of a general nature: How tight is tight? Do you keep at it till you burst an artery in your head?
    Last edited by EliB; 12-23-05 at 05:39 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliB
    One more question - perhaps of a general nature: How tight is tight? Do you keep at it till you burst an artery in your head?
    No, don't burst a blood vessel. You want them tight but not TIGHT. For reasons that escape me, some mechanics make them absurdly tight but it's not necessary. I tighten mine fairly firmly, not extremely tight, and I've never had a pedal loosen.

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    Senior Member bon_gabs's Avatar
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    I just installed a new Look pedal on my sram red Crank,then I torqued it 44nm,,did It caused any damage? the Sram website states that 47 to 54nm though,,

    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    No, don't burst a blood vessel. You want them tight but not TIGHT. For reasons that escape me, some mechanics make them absurdly tight but it's not necessary. I tighten mine fairly firmly, not extremely tight, and I've never had a pedal loosen.

  16. #16
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    you can find alot of tools at your local hardware store for a fraction of the cost of bike specific tools.

    15mm wrench versus pedal wrench is a great example
    Quote Originally Posted by powers2b View Post
    BF does not have the answer to what you will be happy with.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustachiod View Post
    you can find alot of tools at your local hardware store for a fraction of the cost of bike specific tools.

    15mm wrench versus pedal wrench is a great example
    Not quite that simple. Many pedals have spindle flats too narrow for a standard open end wrench.

  18. #18
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
    Not quite that simple. Many pedals have spindle flats too narrow for a standard open end wrench.
    + Pedal wrench is one of those tools where the bike specific model is worth it. I really like the "Inline Offset Pedal Wrench". I got mine at Niagara, they don't stock them anymore, but Amazon sells them for $8.

    http://www.amazon.com/Inline-Offset-.../dp/B000C12B18

  19. #19
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    "Beyond this - if I can get there- is there a difference between Lube and grease?"

    Grease is a lubricant.

    "A lubricant (sometimes referred to as "lube") is a substance (often a liquid) introduced between two moving surfaces to reduce the friction between them, improving efficiency and reducing wear." wiki so it is largely true
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

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