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Old 12-26-05, 05:33 PM   #1
NFields
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Old frame newer wheels (can they fit)

Greetings,

I have an 87 Peugeot with 6 speed freewheel at 126mm. I would like to use a newer rear wheel but it is for 9 speed freehub at 130. Do I have any cheap options other than cold setting the frame?

Thanks in advance,
NFields
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Old 12-26-05, 05:37 PM   #2
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coldseting the rear triangle is the best option and not all that expensive.
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Old 12-26-05, 07:34 PM   #3
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Two choices:

1. Cold set the frame which is easy using a 3/8" all-thread rod and a couple of nuts and washers.

2. Leave the frame at 126 mm and fight the rear wheel in and out every time you have a flat tire. Can be done but isn't much fun.
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Old 12-26-05, 09:17 PM   #4
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Very doable, at home, for free. I followed Sheldon's instructions with my old Fuji Ace frame and it worked like a charm. Do not try this with an aluminum frame, of course:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html

Bob
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Old 12-26-05, 09:30 PM   #5
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Step 1: take it to a bike shop
Step 2: have them spread the rear triangle 2mm on each side to accomodate your 130mm spaced axle. Then have them realign the dropouts with precision tools. It sould cost around 40 or 50 dollars and can only be done if the frame is steel.
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Old 12-27-05, 08:04 AM   #6
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I used to have a Peugeot 753 pro (nice bike, rest in peace) with 7 speed Ultegra. On upgrading to 10 speed campy, I just stuffed the wheel in and tuned in the derailleur. It worked smoothly, didn't even think about cold setting the frame or have to.
Advice - see if it works, if it don't then go then go to your LBS.
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Old 12-27-05, 09:36 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
Two choices:

1. Cold set the frame which is easy using a 3/8" all-thread rod and a couple of nuts and washers.

2. Leave the frame at 126 mm and fight the rear wheel in and out every time you have a flat tire. Can be done but isn't much fun.
Spreading the frame with a rod and bolts won't do anything, in my opinion. You have to really put some stretch into the frame to bend it at all (unless you're talking about a very long rod --and then you don't know which side is bending how much). I've done Sheldon's method many times (well, 5 or 6 times). It takes some feel to know when you've actually caused it to bend, and you may overshoot the first time. It may become an iterative process.

Also hand spreading the 126 to fit a 130 wheel each time is a little annoying but not that hard. Unless you want to do some super fast wheel changes, I wouldn't change the frame.
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Old 12-27-05, 09:44 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbg
Spreading the frame with a rod and bolts won't do anything, in my opinion. You have to really put some stretch into the frame to bend it at all (unless you're talking about a very long rod --and then you don't know which side is bending how much). I've done Sheldon's method many times (well, 5 or 6 times). It takes some feel to know when you've actually caused it to bend, and you may overshoot the first time. It may become an iterative process.
I haven't done very many but I've done a few. The last couple I just bent with my hands until the spacing and alignment checked out. It wasn't all that hard to do and I'm not particularly strong.
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Old 12-27-05, 09:49 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbg
Spreading the frame with a rod and bolts won't do anything, in my opinion. You have to really put some stretch into the frame to bend it at all (unless you're talking about a very long rod --and then you don't know which side is bending how much). I've done Sheldon's method many times (well, 5 or 6 times). It takes some feel to know when you've actually caused it to bend, and you may overshoot the first time. It may become an iterative process.

Also hand spreading the 126 to fit a 130 wheel each time is a little annoying but not that hard. Unless you want to do some super fast wheel changes, I wouldn't change the frame.
Your opinion is incorrect. A 12" or 18" section of 3/8" all-thread, two washers and two nuts is a perfectly functional and reliable method for respacing steel frames. I've done it several times with complete success.

Of course you have to stretch the frame beyond the final spacing. The rod method lets you do it methodically by counting turns so you approach the final dimensions gradually. There is no "iterative process" involved and, if you are careful, it works the first time for anyone. It also has no problems with maintaining alignment as both chainstay/seatstay pairs are very similar and tend to bend evenly.

As to leaving the spacing at 126 and just hand spreading the frame for each wheel installation, sure it works ans isn't THAT hard. It is a bit slow and can be a real nuisance the day you have to change a flat in the rain. Trust me on this one.
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Old 12-27-05, 09:58 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
Your opinion is incorrect. A 12" or 18" section of 3/8" all-thread, two washers and two nuts is a perfectly functional and reliable method for respacing steel frames. I've done it several times with complete success.

Of course you have to stretch the frame beyond the final spacing. The rod method lets you do it methodically by counting turns so you approach the final dimensions gradually. There is no "iterative process" involved and, if you are careful, it works the first time for anyone. It also has no problems with maintaining alignment as both chainstay/seatstay pairs are very similar and tend to bend evenly.

As to leaving the spacing at 126 and just hand spreading the frame for each wheel installation, sure it works ans isn't THAT hard. It is a bit slow and can be a real nuisance the day you have to change a flat in the rain. Trust me on this one.
Sorry but I don't buy it. My first attempts at such bending used a 12" rod just as you specified. Bolts backed all the way out still never resulted in a permanent bend. I abandoned the method when I realized it is unlikely that both sides will bend in perfect proportion anyway. One side will likely bend before the other.
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Old 12-27-05, 10:04 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by dbg
Sorry but I don't buy it. My first attempts at such bending used a 12" rod just as you specified. Bolts backed all the way out still never resulted in a permanent bend. I abandoned the method when I realized it is unlikely that both sides will bend in perfect proportion anyway. One side will likely bend before the other.
You don't have to buy it. Nevertheless it works. All you needed was a longer rod. Racing/sports frames with short chainstays can be cold set with a shorter rod. Old frames with longer stays need a longer rod to get the final displacement. And yes, both sided bend in perfect enough proportions that alignment is no problem. Keep in mind the total "stretch" is only 4mm or 1/6".
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