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  1. #1
    Senior Member Bodeco's Avatar
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    Hi all, hope you had a great holiday season.

    What is the difficulty level for upgrading a bike to disc brakes? I currently have a 2005 Trek 4500 with stock v brakes. Is this something a newb should not attempt?
    Last edited by Bodeco; 01-03-06 at 06:10 PM. Reason: accidental submit push... <sigh>

  2. #2
    Senior Member freeranger's Avatar
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    So long as your fork has disc brake mounts, no big deal. There are a couple of different mounts, so check that your fork has the one needed (or that an adaptor comes with the caliper). You don't really need a disc on the back, IMHO, it's just overkill, as most braking is (or should be) done with the front brake anyway. V's are plenty strong enough for the back. But if you want a disc on the back, again, check to see the frame has mounts for it. Mechanical discs are a little easier to maintain, as you don't have to worry about bleeding them (and you can still use your v-levers). Avid's had the best reputation for mechanical discs, and if you are new at it, would be much easier to maintain.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bodeco's Avatar
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    Thanks Freeranger. My bike does have mounts and I do have disc ready hubs.

    I have always heard great things about Avid and have been scoping them out on Pricepoint.com. A mite confusing with the size differences: 160mm, 185mm, and 203mm. Would one size be preferred over another? I've read the FAQ but I'm really not sure which ones I would need.

    I should probably just get my LBS to install them for me.

  4. #4
    Taking "s" outta "Fast" AfterThisNap's Avatar
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    do them yourself. Avids are very user friendly and easy to install. The instructions are very comprehensive as well.
    The size differences are in the rotor. Bigger rotors stop better, but even the smallest size will stop incredibly well compared to your current brakes. Stick with the 160s for now.

  5. #5
    Obeying Gravity
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    Quote Originally Posted by AfterThisNap
    do them yourself. Avids are very user friendly and easy to install. The instructions are very comprehensive as well.
    The size differences are in the rotor. Bigger rotors stop better, but even the smallest size will stop incredibly well compared to your current brakes. Stick with the 160s for now.
    Agreed. BB7's is the way to go. Install is maybe 10-15 min. They might squeak in the beginning, but once they get dialed in, they are awesome. For your bike, 160mm will do fine.

    Matt

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bodeco's Avatar
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    Ok you all have motivated me to do it myself.

    I downloaded the installation instructions for the 160mm brakes from their website and it indicates that a torque wrench is necessary for one step. I don't have any problems ordering one... is it something that would be useful for bike maintenance down the road, or should I just try to borrow one from a friend?

    Thanks a ton for the great info!

    -Alan

  7. #7
    MADE IN HONG KONG
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    a torque wrench is not all that necessary ... I think the step had to do with the torx head bolts for the disc anyway. The little wrench they give you will work fine ... when it hurts a lot or the wrencg start to cam out.... STOP!

    remember to clean the mating surfaces between the disc and hub really well. A good practice at final assembly is to rub the disc against the hub a bunch (i.e. by rotating it) before screwing in the bolts.

    cheers.
    If you are not having any fun, it's all your fault

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