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  1. #1
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    Front mech mudguard?

    Is there any sort of device available that keeps the front mech from getting covered in mud from the rear wheel? If not, has anyone managed to cobble together something themselves? I don't mean a long mudguard - just something probably a few inches long attached to the seat tube purely to protect the rear mech.

  2. #2
    Videre non videri
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdCf
    No, something to protect the front der mech from mud from the rear wheel. I'd thought about the type of thing in your link. It wouldn't work because it wouldn't mount on the rear of the seat tube without fouling the mech operating cable, and the mech itself. Thanx for trying though

  4. #4
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    But is it a problem really? The dirt, I mean...
    My front mech was full of dirt two days ago, but an old toothbrush and a piece of cloth got it back to its normal self in a few minutes. Most of it is stainless or plastic anyway, it seems.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdCf


    But is it a problem really? The dirt, I mean...
    My front mech was full of dirt two days ago, but an old toothbrush and a piece of cloth got it back to its normal self in a few minutes. Most of it is stainless or plastic anyway, it seems.
    It just offends my sensibilities a bit - the biggest clump of mud on my bike is the one wrapped round what is supposed to be a precision component.

    Of course you're absolutely right; it's never actually been a problem, I don't suppose it ever will be and my mech has always worked fine

  6. #6
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    You should be able to cobble something with a bit of plastic or stair tread. The problem I see is that you have limited space between the derailleur sitting on the small ring and the tire and chainstay.

    I ride only on roads, but under the right circumstances, winter conditions make a real mess of a bicycle. I find that full fenders and especially a long mudflap on the front fender do wonders to keep the drivetrain clean.

    Come to think of it, the rear fender and its struts, plus the brakes and chainstays probably cut most of the sleet (or mud) that would otherwise clog the front derailleur.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

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    Taking "s" outta "Fast" AfterThisNap's Avatar
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    If MTBing in heavy mud, spray down your mech and downtube and fork sliders with no-stick cooking spray. Mud that gets thrown up will simply slide off.

  8. #8
    Svr
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michel Gagnon
    I find that full fenders and especially a long mudflap on the front fender do wonders to keep the drivetrain clean.

    Come to think of it, the rear fender and its struts, plus the brakes and chainstays probably cut most of the sleet (or mud) that would otherwise clog the front derailleur.
    I find that not to be the case...
    I have full fenders, and they're almost twice as wide as the tyre itself. Still, a fair amount of dirt ends up in the derailer...
    Some of it is probably thrown up from nearby cars, and some of it comes from the "unfendered" bottom section of the front tyre.

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    You can make your own grunge guard for the front mech using a section of inner tube and a couple of zip ties.

  11. #11
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    Thanks for all posts. Some useful stuff there - I hadn't heard the non stick cooking spray one before & I'll try it.

    Having looked at my bike again today there does indeed seem to be too much lateral movement of the mech to allow any sort of fixed mudguard solution. If the cooking spray fails I'll give the home made grunge guard a go.

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