Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-19-06, 08:56 PM   #1
youngster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Montréal, Québec
Bikes: Giant OCR 2004, Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL 2007
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Trying to find a cotter bolt : is it possible?

I went to my LBS today and they said they didn't have it...not really surprising. Is it possible to find that today, or will I have to buy a new BB and crankset? In that case I'm not sure I'd go for it since it's only for an old bike that I found and that I'm rebuilding. Helps time goes by while winter is killing me!


thanks,

youngster
youngster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-06, 09:04 PM   #2
dafydd
JRA...
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: philly
Bikes: trek 520 & 736, DeRosa Professional, Fuji Professional, Raleigh International 3-speed, Saronni (any info people?), Humber 3-speed, Raleigh Sports, Carlton Grand Prix coming soon!
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
they're around and still made, you'll just have to call around, maybe check loosescrews. know your cotter diameter. they often need to be filed, either to get the cranks in phase if you only replace one or sometimes for them to fully seat on the spindle, so look for ones with a lot of meat. you can always take away but you can't add.
dafydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-06, 01:44 AM   #3
neilG
Senior Member
 
neilG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Ventura, CA
Bikes: Madone, De Rosa, Langster, some old Brit track iron
Posts: 441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When you find the right cotter, it might be a good idea to replace both of them to have a better chance of keeping the cranks parallel.
neilG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-06, 07:17 AM   #4
TallRider
me have long head tube
 
TallRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Bikes:
Posts: 4,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd just ditch steel cottered cranks altogether. But Sheldon's shop, Harris Cyclery, carries cotter pins. It's on the Cranks page, I think.
TallRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-06, 07:41 AM   #5
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Bike Tools Etc. also has them for $2/pair is most sizes.

I'm with Tim on this one. Replacing it with a cheap square taper three-piece crank and bottom bracket is probably worth the effort and minor cost. Most of the cottered cranks I've seen were heavy as anvils. You might see if your LBS has a used or NOS crank in his parts drawers that you could get at low cost.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-06, 11:48 AM   #6
youngster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Montréal, Québec
Bikes: Giant OCR 2004, Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL 2007
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll think about it. You're right about the weight of that thing : I'm having problems to lift it off the ground
youngster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-06, 09:17 AM   #7
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 16,902
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
The advice in this thread is spot-on. However, if you have own a classic bicycle with all-original components, such as my 1960 Capo (as opposed to my repainted and heavily-updated/upgraded 1959 Capo), you may want to keep those cottered cranks on the bike, or at least store them safely for a future collector if you do decide to replace them. The (admittedly rotating) weight penalty is well under a half kilo, and old steel cottered cranks are much safer than old aluminum cotterless. (I have broken one of each. The Agrati steel crank, OEM on my first 1960 Capo, broke at the cotter eye, and I was able to ride home with the left crank timing advanced by about 25 degrees. The Sugino aluminum crank, OEM on my 1971 Nishiki Competition, snapped at the pedal eye, causing a painful and potentially dangerous crash.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:44 AM.