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  1. #1
    grilled cheesus aham23's Avatar
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    Should I Wrench?

    Alright, to feed my upgraditis and need to do something during winter in Chicago, I scavanged the internet for some Shimano 105 components to upgrade my 05 Trek 1000 to a 9 spd. So, I got 105 brifters, RD, FD, Ultegra 9spd cassatte, and a SRAM chain. I have never wrenched or worked on a road bike before. I aint stupid. I am good at using the net to find help. I picked up a basic tool set and repair stand. Should I attempt this OR just run the stuff down to the LBS for the install and tune? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Eternally Riding
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    Ok, you scavanged the net for parts, then want the shops you stiffed to install them? Hope they charge you double...

  3. #3
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    Of course you should. Why not? BTW, how much did all of that set you back? Sounds like you should have started with a 1200.

    I also have the 05 Trek 1000. If i upgrade anything i will do the wheels. I am sticking with 8 speed on all of my bikes. I hear 9 speed chains wear out faster and i wear them out too fast already. I won't go to 9 speed until i upgrade bikes sometime.
    Last edited by Portis; 01-20-06 at 01:54 PM.

  4. #4
    Too Much Crazy
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    You would need nine speed cranks or at least chainrings also I think

    Why not do it yourself?

    You got the tools, it's not that hard. Just read the directions first. I know it sounds silly but it helps .

    Good luck

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    Yes you should.

    Just make sure that the nuts and bolts you are wrenching are perfectly clean and lube the threads with oil or grease. Most of the stuff you will be working on has pretty small fasteners, so take it easy, they will strip easily.

    Setting up a new drive train is a pretty big undertaking, but just go slowly, ask a lot of questions and you'll get it. Getting the front derailleur height and angle is probably the toughest part of the job.

    Just in case, mark the position of the stuff you took off your bike in case you have to put the old parts back on.

  6. #6
    Unique Vintage Steel cuda2k's Avatar
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    Go for it. One word of advise though - take pictures as you are taking the stuff APART so you can reference them when you go to put the new stuff on. Other than that you don't seem to be messing with anything that has a lot of individual parts on it so keeping track of little pieces isn't a problem. the Parktools website should give you instructions on anything you need to know beyond what you learn taking the stuff apart (like adjusting the new levers/derailleur to shift well).

  7. #7
    grilled cheesus aham23's Avatar
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    Ok, you scavanged the net for parts, then want the shops you stiffed to install them? Hope they charge you double...
    sounds like a bitter bike shop owner!

    BTW, how much did all of that set you back? Sounds like you should have started with a 1200.
    I actually got good deals on most of the stuff. Along with gift cards and selling (eBay) some other odds and ends I ended up ok. Goes like this:

    05 Trek 1000 $499 (LBS had a big online sale)

    105 FD $33.72 Nashar
    105 RD $34.36 eBay - new
    105 brifters $139.09 Nashbar
    Ultegra Cassatte $1.89 Performance (used $50 gift card)
    Sram Chain $28.46 eBay - new
    Easton EA70 110 Stem $41.00 eBay - used
    Ascent Tool Kit $42.67 Performance
    Spin Docs Repair Stand - $ xmass gift $ - performance

    Proceeds from Xbox sale = $153 for a total cost to me of $168.19 (if my bad math is right).

    I guess I am just nervous I will get the parts off and not be able to figure something out. The Cassatte install seems the most difficult??? I think I will give it a shot though. Thanks for the tips. Later.

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    Heck-save some $$ and do it yourself.The digital pictures are a great idea.Cleaning-before starting the work- is is a great idea also.
    I would take it outside and spray it with simple green-repeat-scrub with soft brush etc.
    You will need new cables-probably can use the old housings,but new ones will be nice.Get some new "caps-ends" for the cable housings-get some of the little cable ends also ,so you don't stab yourself with the cables(don't ask how I learned that).Nashbar or the LBS for thses odds and ends.
    Get a decent cable cutter.Make sure you re-round the inside of the housing,it always gets slightly squashed when you cut the housing.There is usually a little awl on cable cutters for this.

    Simple green works well to help pull off your old grips-pry up the old grip with something that won't scratch the bar-cloth covered screwdriver etc-spray some in there-twist the grip-respray-they will slide off.
    You might have to "break" the old chain with a chain tool-push the link out.Reinstall the new chain over clean newspaper(grit).You also can use straightened paperclips to sorta hold the new chain in place,and thread it thru the derails.
    Don't cut the cable too short-leave it a bit long until you are sure of the final result.It is easier to get pliers on 3" than 1/2" of cable.
    Luck,Charlie

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclingFool
    Ok, you scavanged the net for parts, then want the shops you stiffed to install them? Hope they charge you double...
    I fail to see how the OP "stiffed" the shop. Was he contractually obligated to purchase parts from them?

  10. #10
    Unique Vintage Steel cuda2k's Avatar
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    I haven't dealt with Shimano Casettes before, but from what I've seen of them there should only be one one position that the cog will slip onto the freehub in and as long as you put them on in the right order there's not much that can go wrong. I use SRAM cassettes which are all one piece except for the smallest tooth and the lock ring. The rest of the advise given has been very sound as well. Good luck - post questions if you have any - someone will know the answer.

  11. #11
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    buy some decent tools, look at the park tools web page (good tech advice) and give it a shot. bikes are really not all that complicated machines. the first time you try to adjust the mechs can be a harrowing experience, so fair warning.

    good luck. you can always sheepishly take it to the LBS if you botch it badly enough.

  12. #12
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    Do you have a friend who is an experienced bike mechanic that you can get to watch while you do the work? That way you do the actual build but there is a safety valve if you get into something over your head. Your friend doesn't have to be a pro, just someone who has done this sort of thing before.

    Lunch and some beer would be a suitable bribe.

  13. #13
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aham23
    Alright, to feed my upgraditis and need to do something during winter in Chicago, I scavanged the internet for some Shimano 105 components to upgrade my 05 Trek 1000 to a 9 spd. So, I got 105 brifters, RD, FD, Ultegra 9spd cassatte, and a SRAM chain. I have never wrenched or worked on a road bike before. I aint stupid. I am good at using the net to find help. I picked up a basic tool set and repair stand. Should I attempt this OR just run the stuff down to the LBS for the install and tune? Thanks.
    It's a great way to learn - you have the basic tools. Someone else mentioned getting a good cable-cutter (great suggestion!). It's not so much that wrenching is difficult, in fact it's quite easy - the difficult part is dealing with the problems which might arise for reasons like not having the correct tools, or finding that the components don't quite fit. You might also find a torque-wrench useful (pedals, cranks, chain-rings, BBs).

    Good Luck!

    - Wil

  14. #14
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    Do you have a friend who is an experienced bike mechanic that you can get to watch while you do the work? That way you do the actual build but there is a safety valve if you get into something over your head. Your friend doesn't have to be a pro, just someone who has done this sort of thing before.

    Lunch and some beer would be a suitable bribe.
    Reminds me of a sign in a my local garage:

    Our Rates:

    $50/hr to work on your car

    $75/hr if you watch

    $100/hr if you help



    - Wil

  15. #15
    Eternally Riding
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    Nope, not a bitter bike shop owner; but I know a few people who work in them. I have just seen too many cases where people buy stuff from eBay, ask a shop to install it, then have a fit when it doesn't work right. The shop may also not warrantee stuff that you didn't buy from them (or an authorized dealer). The worst are those who hit the shops to test ride and then hit the net for a better deal (or worse, expect shops to match the price they find on ebay). Now, off of my soap box and on to useful stuff...

    Knock yourself out wrenching it yourself. I found the Barnett series of books (very detailed shop manuals, set of four) at my local public library. They have all the details you could ever want and lead you through step by step. Some bikes shops may also have seminars on how to do your own maintenance and repairs. I'm spoiled here in Portland, since there are several shops that have public workspace/tools that you can use for an hourly rate. If you need help, there is always a mechanic there (with the appropriate hourly rate). Besides, the best way to learn how to fix it, is to install it. At worst, you'll have to do it over again, but practice makes perfect.

  16. #16
    Eternally Riding
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    Quote Originally Posted by ad6mj
    I fail to see how the OP "stiffed" the shop. Was he contractually obligated to purchase parts from them?

    I have yet to see the auto mechanic who invites me to buy the parts at a discount shop, or pull-it-yourself yard, then will install it for me. If you want them to install it, order it through them or buy it through them. Most of the time, they can point you in a good direction when it comes to upgrades. BTW, I think you should have saved some time and gone with the 1200 at least (or better yet, the 1500) rather than the hassle of upgrading so soon. Good deal on the prices, though...

  17. #17
    Thor's dad Odin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wil Davis
    Reminds me of a sign in a my local garage:

    Our Rates:

    $50/hr to work on your car

    $75/hr if you watch

    $100/hr if you help



    - Wil
    LOL! I used to have a sign in my workshop saying "Labour: $50 per hour or $100 if you'd like to watch"...and another saying "Prices may vary according to customer attitude"
    Customers helping was never an option.


    Quote Originally Posted by CyclingFool
    I have yet to see the auto mechanic who invites me to buy the parts at a discount shop, or pull-it-yourself yard, then will install it for me.
    I wouldn't actually invite anyone to do it, and I'll always charge a bit more if they do.

  18. #18
    Klaatu barada nikto cascade168's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclingFool
    I have yet to see the auto mechanic who invites me to buy the parts at a discount shop, or pull-it-yourself yard, then will install it for me. If you want them to install it, order it through them or buy it through them. Most of the time, they can point you in a good direction when it comes to upgrades. BTW, I think you should have saved some time and gone with the 1200 at least (or better yet, the 1500) rather than the hassle of upgrading so soon. Good deal on the prices, though...
    You guys just kill me. Take a look at this page:

    http://wheelworks.com/repair.htm

    Pay close attention to the part where it says:

    "Labor rates based on parts purchased from Wheelworks. A 20% labor surcharge will apply with your new parts not purchased at Wheelworks."

    Now, what is so difficult about that. Instead of turning away business for the stupidest of reasons, Wheelworks has a clue to what people want to do with their own bikes. It's probably why they are one of the biggest and best bike shops in the entire metro Boston area. They take a really dumb roadblock to business and turn it into a win for both sides with two little sentences. It's not that hard.
    "Work is the curse of the drinking class."
    - Oscar Wilde

  19. #19
    grilled cheesus aham23's Avatar
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    Once again thanks for all the great tips. I don't want to rip anyone off, especially the LBS. They gave me a great deal on the bike in the first place. I am just nervous that I do the upgrade then while riding at 20mph something falls off. I would not expect the LBS to warranty the parts, just the work, and in Chicago I am guessing I can find an LBS with time on their hands. I shop around for everything and use the net as my first source. In fact the LBS where I bought the bike is 30 miles away because the one 5 minutes from my house wouldn't deal and really were not the helpful. Anyway, I think I should have plenty of time to tackle the upgrade myself, unfortunately. Later.

    Winter Time

  20. #20
    Senior Member Thrifty1's Avatar
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    http://www.parktool.com/repair/ is an excellent reference. I purchase all of my tools from http://ebiketools.com/ as they have great prices and excellent service for all park tools. Adjusting derailers will cause the most apprehension but it is not dificult......the most important aspect is to follow the proper sequence/s. A good chain whip, lockring tool, and torque wrench (40nm on cassette lock ring) will be your most important tools. I would suggest some cone wrenches to do the wheel bearings while you're at it. BTW the Trek freehub takes a 11mm hex for removal/install if you want to service it. I am not absolutely positive, but you should be able to use the OEM cahinrings with 9 speed conversion...only a couple thousandths of inches diference in chainring thickness. I retianed the Specialized Expedition OEM 8 speed chainrings when I converted from 8 to 9 speed with absolutely no problems. For me, the PIA part of the project is the post brifter change handlelbar re-wrapping.
    Good Luck and happy conversion/upgrade!
    Gary
    Good Luck

  21. #21
    Unique Vintage Steel cuda2k's Avatar
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    +1 on the handlebar wrap. I run white wrap on my Barracuda Mk.I and you'd think as often as I break down and redo it that I'd be getting good at it by now. If you haven't purchased new wrap yet (which likely you have but anyways) I have found a new favorite - Specialized S-Wrap. LBS carries it for $14.99 and it has a simi-tacky backing to it instead of the thin adhesive strip that most others have. Keeps the wrap in place but allows for VERY easy re-do's as many times as needed. Great for learning!

  22. #22
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Of course you should do it yourself! Why would anybody want to pay someone else to have the fun of doing it? You live in Chicago? You've got a couple of months of winter left. That's more than enough time to screw it up a couple of times and still set it right before the nice weather sets in.
    Last edited by Retro Grouch; 01-21-06 at 09:54 AM.

  23. #23
    Hopped up on goofballs yakes_md's Avatar
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    Definitely do it yourself. I built a bike from parts, it's not rocket science. If you need 9 speed cranks, check out this deal on Ultegra from JensonUSA. Good luck

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Crankset.aspx

  24. #24
    so whatcha' want? bigskymacadam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclingFool
    I'm spoiled here in Portland, since there are several shops that have public workspace/tools that you can use for an hourly rate. If you need help, there is always a mechanic there (with the appropriate hourly rate).
    that's cool. which shop offer this? i've only been to lakeside and bike gallery ...

  25. #25
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    If you up grade a Trek 1000 you wasting your money, you have to change the casset chain crank derailers and shifters, git a ne bike bro, cut wheight and cost.

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