Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Senior Member concernicus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz
    My Bikes
    doesnt matter. just ride.
    Posts
    425
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    good spoke machine

    im thinking of getting a spoke cutting and threading machine for my shop and was wondering if there was a machine equal to Phil's Spoke Machine. i was told that if i were to get a spoke machine, to get a Phil's. is that true? is there one cheaper yet as good of quality?

  2. #2
    Senior Member jonsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    My Bikes
    Yellow Nashbar fixed gear conversion, Cannondale T800, Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hozan makes a spoke threader. I think they're $130 or something. The Phil Wood cutter is $3,900+.

  3. #3
    Obeying Gravity
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    2,962
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jonsam
    Hozan makes a spoke threader. I think they're $130 or something. The Phil Wood cutter is $3,900+.
    From United Bicycle Supply it's only $2950

  4. #4
    Senior Member jonsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    My Bikes
    Yellow Nashbar fixed gear conversion, Cannondale T800, Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is a thread with some information on thread cutting and the different machines.

    Cutting thread on spokes

  5. #5
    Senior Member concernicus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz
    My Bikes
    doesnt matter. just ride.
    Posts
    425
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    thanks guys. ill definitely check out the hozan. 3000 dollars and 100 dollars is a huge difference. i wonder if there is anything in between.

  6. #6
    Senior Member caotropheus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Portugal-Israel
    Posts
    862
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Guys, any link for a web store that sells the Hozan spoke machine?

  7. #7
    Klaatu barada nikto cascade168's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    1,453
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by caotropheus
    Guys, any link for a web store that sells the Hozan spoke machine?
    http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...ing%20Machines
    "Work is the curse of the drinking class."
    - Oscar Wilde

  8. #8
    fmw
    fmw is offline
    Hoosier Pedaler fmw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Understand that factory spoke threads are rolled an not cut so that they are stronger. The Phil Woods machine rolls the threads. The Hozan machine cuts them so the spokes are weakened somewhat.

  9. #9
    Jonnys ilegitimate Father cavernmech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    toronto
    My Bikes
    too many too list
    Posts
    2,994
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    While super expensive, the Phil machine is a thing of beauty. I have a Hozan threader and while it is handy for making 1 or 2 spokes, cutting a whole set with it would be a royal pain in the ass. You also have to cut them down to the right length before threading. The Phil rolls and cuts them to the right length in one turn of the handle. The Phil machine is like their hubs......the Hozan one is like a Joy Tech in comparison.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,655
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Phil Wood threader is a commercial quality machine intended for serious wheelbuilders. The Hozan is made for home hobbyists and for occasional use. If you are buying a spoke cutter for use in a bike shop, get the Phil.

    My LBS has one and it pays for itself as they only stock one length of spokes (the longest available) and make all the other lengths as needed. They never run out of the required size.

  11. #11
    C21 H30 O2 plantdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Oakland
    My Bikes
    more bikes than toes and fingers
    Posts
    118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Years back I had the priveledge of working in a shop that had the second Phil spoke cutter ever made (#2 serial number). The original shop owner was sitting next to Phil himself on a plane and heard his idea...

    If you are serious about wheel building and plan to do it as a profession...get the Phil spoke cutter. The fact that it rolls the threads rather than cuts them is a big difference.

    The other option (although sounds like it is one you're tired of) is, depending on the variety of wheels you're building, is just to have a stock of spokes in many different lengths. Than you don't have to do any cutting/threading yourself. $3000 is a lot of boxes of spokes...

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    My Bikes
    Motobecane Le Champion Team, Trek 6700 Custom
    Posts
    72
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fmw
    Understand that factory spoke threads are rolled an not cut so that they are stronger. The Phil Woods machine rolls the threads. The Hozan machine cuts them so the spokes are weakened somewhat.

    Not ture... Hozan tool rolls the thread as well. I've had the opportunity to use both machines. The Hozan tool is ideal for cutting one or two spokes but it would be very tiring to try to roll out 64 spokes for a wheelset (redundant, sorry). The Phil Wood tool is designed as a production tool that will cut and thread a spoke in a turn of the handle.
    Don't spray WD-40 in/on it. WD-40 is a TEMPORARY WATER DISPLACER, not a long term oil.

  13. #13
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fmw
    Understand that factory spoke threads are rolled an not cut so that they are stronger. The Phil Woods machine rolls the threads. The Hozan machine cuts them so the spokes are weakened somewhat.
    The Hozan rolls them as well. There's three rolling dies on the head and the adjustable nut determines how far apart they are for 1.5-2.2mm spokes. I've used this tool to build hundreds of wheels, it's slow, but for those times when you don't have quite the right spoke-length, it works well. Also best if you only have to shorten the spokes just a little so that there's 1-2 of the original threads left to start the rollers. With a bare spoke, you have to be careful to grind a bevel on the tip so thar the rollers can start gradually (makes them last longer as well). The Hozan tool is a favorite amongst the RC helicopter & plane crowd because they can use them to thread control rods.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •