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  1. #1
    Sweetened with Splenda
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    Patching tubes - rubber cement?

    Is there any real difference between the rubber cement in those little tubes in patch kits and the rubber cement sold in 8-oz jars in the office-supply store?

    -chris
    Falling down is not exercising.

  2. #2
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    I don't think so, but carrying around an 8oz glass jar would be a bit much.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

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    Sweetened with Splenda
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan
    I don't think so, but carrying around an 8oz glass jar would be a bit much.
    Well, sure. But most of my patching gets done at home, and the big 100-patch boxes of tip-top patches seem like the affordable way to have a lifetime supply - except that they don't come with glue
    Falling down is not exercising.

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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenrobot
    Well, sure. But most of my patching gets done at home, and the big 100-patch boxes of tip-top patches seem like the affordable way to have a lifetime supply - except that they don't come with glue
    For many years, I used a big bottle of Monkey Grip vulcanizing fluid and Rema tip-top patches when I patched tubes at home. I am currently giving glueless patches another try, after disappointing results several years ago.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  5. #5
    Sweetened with Splenda
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    What is this Monkey Grip of which you speak?
    Falling down is not exercising.

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    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenrobot
    Is there any real difference between the rubber cement in those little tubes in patch kits and the rubber cement sold in 8-oz jars in the office-supply store?

    -chris
    I'll make an educated guess and say there is a big difference with the tube repair and stationary quality rubber cement. Rubber cement made for tube patching is a vulcanizing agent - essentially chemcally fusing the patch to the tube. Stationary cement works by adhesion.

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    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
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    something that always struck me as odd is that you are supposed to apply the cement and then let it dry before applying the patch. That is what the instructions lead one to believe and I have tried both methods. waiting for the cement to dry makes it much easier and cleaner and it works!! Can anyone explain this to me?

  8. #8
    2_i
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclotoine
    something that always struck me as odd is that you are supposed to apply the cement and then let it dry before applying the patch. Can anyone explain this to me?
    The fragile bond is between the cement and the tube. You first make the cement set on the tube undisturbed to make that bond as strong as possible. Far more straightforward, by comparison, is the cement bonding with the patch side that is made out of less vulcanized rubber than the tube and has been just freshly exposed before it could collect any dirt.

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    I've been using Elmer's Rubber Cement with Rema patches (bought by the 100 patch box also) for years with excellent results.

    As to the cement in the patch kits being "vulcanizing fluid", that chemically incorrect. It's thin rubber cement, plain and simple. Tubes are already vulcanized. Nothing more is going to happen to them and certainly not at room temperature.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    I've been using Elmer's Rubber Cement with Rema patches (bought by the 100 patch box also) for years with excellent results.

    As to the cement in the patch kits being "vulcanizing fluid", that chemically incorrect. It's thin rubber cement, plain and simple. Tubes are already vulcanized. Nothing more is going to happen to them and certainly not at room temperature.

    Your experiences with stationary rubber cement trumps my educated guess! Mudpie stands corrected.

  11. #11
    SE Wis dedhed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenrobot
    What is this Monkey Grip of which you speak?
    Monkey grip is an automotive tire repair product line.
    http://www.victorautomotive.net/pages/

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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    I've been using Elmer's Rubber Cement with Rema patches (bought by the 100 patch box also) for years with excellent results.

    As to the cement in the patch kits being "vulcanizing fluid", that chemically incorrect. It's thin rubber cement, plain and simple. Tubes are already vulcanized. Nothing more is going to happen to them and certainly not at room temperature.
    I actually go one step further. I cut patches out of an old tube and glue them with rubber cement.

    Bob

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    Dave TRUMPHENT's Avatar
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    ""I actually go one step further. I cut patches out of an old tube and glue them with rubber cement.

    Bob""

    That is frugality at its finest! I will never throw an innertube away again. Thanks for the tip.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRUMPHENT
    That is frugality at its finest! I will never throw an innertube away again. Thanks for the tip.
    Well, my use of office supply rubber cement isn't intended to save money but to insure I always have useable rubber cement when I need to patch a tube. Those little tubes of cement that come with patch kits seem to dry out overnight and are worthless by the time I need them again.

    Saving money is just a nice side effect.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    Those little tubes of cement that come with patch kits seem to dry out overnight and are worthless by the time I need them again.
    That's the fallacy of carrying a patch kit with you on the bike. Of course, if you carry a brand new never opened one, I suppose you could use the thorn that you just dug out of your tire to puncture the seal on your tube of glue.

  16. #16
    Senior Member librarian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider
    Those little tubes of cement that come with patch kits seem to dry out overnight and are worthless by the time I need them again.
    To save a little money, buy some patch kits at the dollar store. Throw away the thick patches and keep the glue. HillRider is right about it drying in the tube right away. I only get to use it once, that's why I don't buy it at the bike store for three dollars.

    I do, though, usually keep some of the thick patches for kids on the bike path when they have a flat on their xmart bike. (I get to promote helmet safety while patching their flat.)

  17. #17
    Sweetened with Splenda
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    Quote Originally Posted by librarian
    To save a little money, buy some patch kits at the dollar store. Throw away the thick patches and keep the glue. HillRider is right about it drying in the tube right away. I only get to use it once, that's why I don't buy it at the bike store for three dollars.

    I do, though, usually keep some of the thick patches for kids on the bike path when they have a flat on their xmart bike. (I get to promote helmet safety while patching their flat.)

    Yeah, it's the dollar-store patches that have finally driven me to try to track down a box of tip-tops
    Falling down is not exercising.

  18. #18
    weirdo
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    Ok, the cutting out the old tube thing... Are you actually cutting out ould patches, or just using rubber cement to glue pieces of an old tube to the one you are trying to repiar. I only ask because I am the cheapest person on the face of the earth and don't want to waste my rubber cement trying the wrong thing.

  19. #19
    Sweetened with Splenda
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flanderflop
    Ok, the cutting out the old tube thing... Are you actually cutting out ould patches, or just using rubber cement to glue pieces of an old tube to the one you are trying to repiar. I only ask because I am the cheapest person on the face of the earth and don't want to waste my rubber cement trying the wrong thing.

    I think they're gluing bits of old tubes to repairable tubes. I've done it myself, but ultimately decided it was worth buying patches... If you DO try it, be sure to sand both surfaces thoroughly - tubes are coated with a release agent to get them out of the molds they're made in, and if you don't get all of it off both pieces, nothing's going to stick well...
    Falling down is not exercising.

  20. #20
    Drive the Bicycle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenrobot
    What is this Monkey Grip of which you speak?
    --- Ah yes, what a nostalgia trip. Monkey Grip made sturdy tire patch kits which I used on my fat-tire single speed back in the 1950's. The patches were THICK without feathered edges.
    "The bicycle is the perfect transducer to match man's metabolic energy to the impedance of locomotion. Equipped with this tool, man outstrips the efficiency of not only all machines but all other animals as well." Ivan Illich ('Energy and Equity')1974

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flanderflop
    Ok, the cutting out the old tube thing... Are you actually cutting out ould patches, or just using rubber cement to glue pieces of an old tube to the one you are trying to repiar. I only ask because I am the cheapest person on the face of the earth and don't want to waste my rubber cement trying the wrong thing.
    1. Take an old tube that is non-repairable. E.G. one where the hole is at the valve stem.

    2. Take a box-cutter and a straight edge and cut a dozen or so patches out of the old tube.

    3. Clean each patch with rubbing alcohol.

    4. Clean tube with rubbing alcohol.

    5. apply rubber cement to both surfaces and let semi-dry.

    6. apply patch and clamp overnight. (I typically place a small piece of wax paper on top of the patch and then put something heavy on top of the tube to hold the patch in place while curing).


    Obviously this is a complicated repair that is not intended to be done on the road. If I flat on the road, I replace my tube, saving the old one for repair on my workbench at home.

    Bob

  22. #22
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    sorry for the out of date bump on this thread...someone else linked to it, and it make me think of the below..

    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Well, my use of office supply rubber cement isn't intended to save money but to insure I always have useable rubber cement when I need to patch a tube. Those little tubes of cement that come with patch kits seem to dry out overnight and are worthless by the time I need them again.

    Saving money is just a nice side effect.
    another way to save on rubber cement costs, especially if you have other mechanics pulling from the same jar of glue, is to get two jars of rubber cement. one is huge, and lives in a closet. this one is only used to refill the second, smaller one that lives near the bench. if the top gets left off the smaller, benchtop tub, then you've only wasted that small amount of glue.

    of course, if you have trouble remembering to tighten the lid on your backstock jar, i can't help you.

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