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Old 01-30-06, 01:07 PM   #1
Doggus
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Cleaning and removal of parts question

How feasible is it to remove the cassette, chainring, and derailleurs when cleaning? I currently clean them on the bike but it would be easier to drop em in my cleaning tray if they're easy enough to get off/on. I was looking at Park Tool and looks like you need a special tool to get the chainrings off and I'm assuming the cassette needs a similar specialty tool.
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Old 01-30-06, 01:23 PM   #2
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I do that when restoring a neglected bike, but seldom for routine cleaning. Too much time, effort, tools, risk of messing up your crisp shifting, etc...
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Old 01-30-06, 02:37 PM   #3
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Most of the time easier to clean them on the bike, I think. I just took apart my cassette Saturday (as part of a class). Some of the cogs (3-4) come off individually (and thus are easy to clean), but a bunch are attached together so you have no particular advantage over "flossing" while it's on the bike.

That said, I was doing an "overhaul" class which is a once-a-year procedure for most where you take things apart, check and clean them and put everything back together.
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Old 01-31-06, 05:47 AM   #4
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I'll do that a couple of times a year, especially after a really nasty, wet ride. Most of the time on bike cleaning is sufficient.
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Old 01-31-06, 07:59 AM   #5
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For many cycle owners, the removal and proper maintenance of these items is considered essential. Of the three items you mentioned, the most obvious one that requires proper cleaning, lubing, and adjustment is the rear derailleur. The front chain rings do pick road grime and gunk, as does the cassette. However, in general terms they can be quite grimey and not degrade your shifting etc. When in season and I am able to clock 120-150 miles weekly, the chain comes off for cleaning and lube every 2 months (around 800-900 miles). The derailleurs, chain rings, cassette, cable housings, come off twice yearly for cleaning, lube (as required) reinstall, and adjustment. Wheel hubs aren't repacked and adjusted but maybe every three years, unless I get caught in the rain. Then they get done before the bike is ridden again.

My habits are just that, mine. There are no doubt better maintenance approaches, and I'd be interested in reading them. The important issue though, is that unless you don't care that your bike rapidly declines to a state of Thrift Shop merchandise, proper care is required. If you don't want to learn to do it, or aren't confident that you can then find an experienced and honest mechanic and pay them to do it.
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Old 01-31-06, 10:33 AM   #6
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To remove cassette use a tool called cassette removal tool you will also need a chain whip. Not expensive and you will always use them
To remove chain rings you need a crank removal tool. Again not expensive and you will always use them
To remove chain I suggest that you replace chain next time it wears out with a sram chain which has the links which allow you to open chain without a tool
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Old 01-31-06, 11:21 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Cook
The important issue though, is that unless you don't care that your bike rapidly declines to a state of Thrift Shop merchandise, proper care is required. If you don't want to learn to do it, or aren't confident that you can then find an experienced and honest mechanic and pay them to do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorhommmer
To remove cassette use a tool called cassette removal tool you will also need a chain whip. Not expensive and you will always use them
To remove chain rings you need a crank removal tool. Again not expensive and you will always use them
To remove chain I suggest that you replace chain next time it wears out with a sram chain which has the links which allow you to open chain without a tool
So far my two new bikes only have about 600 miles apiece. I just put on a Connex link (1/2bike) and an SRAM link (tandem) to get the chains off for the gatorade bottle treatment. I ended up cleaning the DRs, cassette and CR on the bikes which was a real PITA (no stand - yet). I've never taken a vehicle in for service/repair in 25 years and I don't intend to take my bikes in. Unfortunately it looks like this will require more specialty tools, but hopefully not too many. Where's the best place to pick up these tools? Online? LBS (i doubt it)? Fleabay?
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Old 01-31-06, 03:09 PM   #8
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If you are going to do all of your own maintenance, I suggest getting one of the smaller kits. It is cheaper than buying individual tools. Just like it is for your cars. Just look at what you get with the kit so you get what you need and not tools that you don't.

Park is generally considered "top of the line" for bike tools. There are other brands, but I haven't used them.

Look at the Park roll up tool kit. It is a good starting point IMHO.

There are specialty wrenches. Cone wrenches are very thin and are used to adjust hubs. A pedal wrench is also thin, so you don't scratch your cranks, and long for leverage.

I am the same as you. Besides A/C and alignment, nobody has ever laid a wrench on one of my cars in 26 years.
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