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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 03-15-06, 12:54 PM   #1
Illah
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I searched around on patching tires and pretty much everything I found was for patching tubes, not the actual tire. My area of SF has pretty nasty roads so I managed to tear my rear tire on a piece of gravel or something. It's a good 5-8mm rip. Amazingly I didn't notice until I got home - a testament to the quality of Slime tubes! It was practically bubbling out of the tire when I found it but I never went flat.

Anyways, this is my second such tear in 2-3 weeks. It's basically a fact of life where I live. This most recent tear was a brand new Conti Gatorskin with maybe 100 miles on them, so if my roads can kill those then you know they're bad

So, I don't want to keep buying tires, can I patch this up somehow? I was thinking:

1. Patch the inside of the tire.
2. Use some type of glue in the tear itself to keep it from opening up when inflated.
3. Patch on the outside of the tire?

Any advice?

Thanks,

--Illah
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Old 03-15-06, 01:01 PM   #2
powers2b
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You can patch a tire but if the cords are torn it will be weak in that area.
For minor tears most people use a boot (Mylar or plastic insert).
Search the forums for tire boots.
Also; keep the repaired/booted tire on the rear wheel in case it decides to blow-out.

Enjoy
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Old 03-15-06, 01:09 PM   #3
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Shoe Goo sees to do a fairly good job of patching tires... for fairly small tears and punctures, anyway. I probably wouldn't trust it if the cords are visibly torn, however.

Edit: You should be able to find it in the adhesives section of your LHS (local hardware store ), and probably X-mart as well.
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Old 03-15-06, 01:13 PM   #4
Illah
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Well I don't have the tire in front of me but it wasn't fraying or anything. The tube was visible through the tire though, so the gash did go all the way through.

From reading around apparently I can boot it with mylar or cloth tape (I have gaffers tape at home - really strong stuff) and then use a tiny bit of rubber cement in the hole itself to seal it up. I also read about self-vulcanizing glues that will fuse the rubber on the outside of the tire together? Where can I get that?

Thanks,

--Illah
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Old 03-15-06, 01:17 PM   #5
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Iíll tell you this much: about 2 months ago I got tire replacements for the everyday bike (700 c). You may have noticed that the orange tyvek (plastic?) tab on the continental brand is tough, I mean you need scissors or a sharp blade to cut if off. Well an exacto was what I had at hand unfortunately I was being a dumba** & didnít notice that I put a very light score on the sidewall.
Long story short I was pumping that tire, not even 40 psi when BOOOM! The burst was as loud as a mid-range shotgun.
I was mad (it was new!) then denial then acceptance & finally grateful that it didnít happen on a congested road barreling down at 21 mph.

Back to your question, is the safety of your well being worth 20 dlls?
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Old 03-15-06, 01:26 PM   #6
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In a similar thread not long ago, someone remarked that a new tire is much cheaper than new dentures. A tire cut through the cords is a risk not worth taking, especially if SF hills are as breathtaking as they appear to be in the movies. A tire boot is a temporary solution that allows you to get home, where you can replace the tire.
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Old 03-15-06, 05:18 PM   #7
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i have had great luck with shoe goo. over 1000 miles on the tire now with no problems.
shoe goo tire repair
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Old 03-15-06, 05:37 PM   #8
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Yeah I've been reading about that. I'm gonna check out the tire when I get home tonight (right now I'm on a spare). I might be overstating the severity of the gouge because I did make it home without a flat after all, and that's with the tube exposed I imagine it has to be fixable if it could stand up to that. If it looks fixable I'll just head off to home depot and get some automotive tire patches and that goo.

If it is in fact a crazy gouge I'll just replace it.

--Illah
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Old 03-15-06, 05:56 PM   #9
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My test is to put a piece of duck tape over the cut on the inside then install and inflate the tire. If I can feel a bulge or a lump at the cut site, then some of the cords are cut and the tire is ruined. If the tire still feels ssmooth, I'll use it on the rear or keep it for a spare.
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Old 03-16-06, 01:23 PM   #10
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i've patched tears/slices in tires up to about a half inch long with a dollar bill. folded the long ways twice, and top to bottom once, its 8 layers thick and plenty strong, while still being flexible. you could use a piece of tape to hold it in place, but its not to difficult to do without. after a while, the bill sticks to the rubber on its own. i've patched tubes in tires repaired with this method without any movement of the bill. i've only done this on road tires, but i have had no problems at all at up to 120 psi.

cashiers may or may not give you funny looks when you finally spend that dollar though - the ink turns darker and there'll be a square rubber stain on one side.
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Old 03-16-06, 01:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
My test is to put a piece of duck tape over the cut on the inside then install and inflate the tire. If I can feel a bulge or a lump at the cut site, then some of the cords are cut and the tire is ruined. If the tire still feels ssmooth, I'll use it on the rear or keep it for a spare.
There's a *slight* bulge using this method - I used two layers of gaffers tape as a boot. It looks like the bulge isn't so much a 'bubble' or bulge surrounding the tear, but just the cut opening from the pressure, and thus it's not level with the rest of the tire. From looking at the tire it seems to have split rather than been cut, and the split is with the 'grain' of the cords if that makes sense. Looks like one cord is actually broken/frayed, but the surrounding ones look perfectly fine.

Oh well, I'm riding on two good tires now (had a spare that has a ton of life in it, only changed it cuz I wanted matching Gatorskins front & back). Is it bad to have different tires front and back? I have a 120psi Specialized Pro on the rear and 95psi Gatorskin up front.

--Illah
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