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  1. #1
    New Orleans
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    NASHBAR's steel mtb frame-any good?

    Is nashbars steel mtb frame any good?I would use it as a big tired street bike,so my main concern is that it is so sturdy that it will ride harshly.It is heavy-6.2lbs without a fork-the same wt a 531 frame would be with a fork.Thanks.Charlie
    PS any better ideas on a steel mtb frame for a street bike?

  2. #2
    fmw
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    Hoosier Pedaler fmw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoebeisis
    Is nashbars steel mtb frame any good?I would use it as a big tired street bike,so my main concern is that it is so sturdy that it will ride harshly.It is heavy-6.2lbs without a fork-the same wt a 531 frame would be with a fork.Thanks.Charlie
    PS any better ideas on a steel mtb frame for a street bike?
    A road frame.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    I don't know anything about the Nashbar frame, but I bet it can't compare to my $25 eBay Trek 930 with a lugged True Temper OXII butted frame and clear Imron over the decals. Early 90's steel Trek hardtails are plentiful and cheap. I also have a Trek 850, a Bridgestone MB-2 and a Japanese-made Peugeot mtb. They're all set up for the street. I didn't pay much for any of them. My daughter rides the Trek 850, and we agree that it's the best riding of the bunch, but it's tig welded and I just can't love a frame that's not lugged.
    Last edited by Grand Bois; 03-16-06 at 01:52 PM.

  4. #4
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    I'd stick with an MTB frame if I were you - even if you're riding only on the road. Considering how bad typical surface streets are with potholes and deterioration, I wouldn't risk a light road frame - especially if you're over 200lbs. MTB is the better option.

  5. #5
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    Seems like a decent frame. However, to compare it with a premium tube frame is unfair so if you want the weight and glamour of Reynolds or Columbus tubes go for it, just don't expect to find one for that price. If you can expand your budget to $200-300 looks for premium tubing frames on ebay.

  6. #6
    me have long head tube TallRider's Avatar
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    Real reason to go with a road frame for street use isn't weight, but rather geometry. Road frame will handle better. You can get heavy-duty road frames, such as those designed for touring. Or just heavier duty non-touring road frames.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    He likes huge tires and an upright riding position. I think that a MTB will suit him better than a road bike if the mtb is properly set up. That's why I suggested a mtb to him in another thread. He has road bikes.

  8. #8
    Senior Member TimJ's Avatar
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    I'm going to be selling either an 18" Trek 950 or an 18" Specialized Rockhopper, both from around circa 1998-99, pretty soon. Most likely the Rockhopper. They’re both cro-mo, the Rockhopper has a Ritchey Nitanium tubeset. I was planning on trying to sell it for about what a nashbar frame sells for.

    I’m not ready to sell just yet (they’re both complete bikes right now), but would you be interested?

  9. #9
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    I bought a Nashbar mtb frame a couple years ago to build up a bike for my wife. I've got so many old mtb parts lying around, it seemed a shame not to have something to hang a few of them on. The frame is fine, although I agree with Dirtdrop, you might look on e-bay for something of better quality for about the same price. I've got an old RockShox Judy fork, a bunch of old, but perfectly functional mtb components, and an old Bontrager mtb wheelset on it. It's turned out to be a great riding bike, she uses it to ride the bike paths with the kids or for occasional errands. The only thing she doesn't like about it is that she doesn't have more time to ride it!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Chuckie J.'s Avatar
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    I actually have one of these blue frames. I got it to hang all my lousy but still functioning bike parts. It's my backup commuter and must admit I love it not so much because it rides so great but because it's rock solid and a POS that nobody cares about. The thing rides fine enough-- a fun bike to lock up outside the bar at 2am.

    I'll post some pictures when I get home.

    Chuckie

  11. #11
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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  12. #12
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    Guys-thanks for all the info advice.A road frame won't do;I have stuffed 42mm(actual width 1.6' and height above rim 1.62") tire on a road frame(with a lot of work),but I want a tire of at least 2"-a MTB frame is the only option-cyclocross frames don't seem to take wider tires than a 70's vintage road frame.
    There is a Specialized bike on Ebay now-15.5" 853 tubing-that is at $180 with a day left.It will probably go for ~$300+ I guess??
    The Nashbar frame is OK,but it would weigh about 26lbs with a suspension fork-heavy.I might just convert my trek Y-50 into a hardtail or near hardtail.I could solid shock it,or just use a very heavy spring or high pressure in an air shock.I'll probably just use my grinder to cut a rectangle of aluminum out-drill it to fit the shock mounts-instant hardtail.It would weigh under 25 lbs, take a 2.5" tire and be free-more or less.
    Still,I will eyeball 853 mtb frames-if I can find one~$200-right size14-16 I'll try it.Thanks.Charlie
    Timj-if I were taller,I might be game-but I need a 14-16.5' mtb frame.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Chuckie J.'s Avatar
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    Here it is. I really like this bike! It's functionally sound, looks absolutely... non-descript, cost about $300 for the entire build. I'm running 7 speed friction shifters, "manual" front derailleur. It has all the braze-ons for racks, fenders, disc brakes (who'd put disc brakes on this thing?...). I'm actually tempted to get a Nashbar Cyclocross frame and build up another low cost commuter.

    This is a 23". I've got a Surly 1x1 rigid fork on it and I'm only guessing that it needed an 80mm suspension corrected fork. That's all I had so I popped it on.

    Chuckie
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
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    i bought one of the nashbar steels last november, bought a cheapo tange rigid mt fork for 39.00 and took all the components off of a pos I found at a garage sale for 15.00 it's heavy as hell but who cares, I ride it everywhere without worrying about it and use it when snow or rains instead of my nice bikes...I think the steel mt and the nashbar cross really good bang for buck frames...check out the cross frame a guy is building up on the croos foorum really nice looking..

  15. #15
    New Orleans
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    duco-you're right-it is hard to beat $69 for a frame,and the cheap beater look is a pretty good anti theft device.Thanks.Charlie

  16. #16
    fitter, happier Ronin's Avatar
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    I ride one and like it just fine,heck truth be told I dont notice much differance between it and my good bike.

  17. #17
    Senior Member bellweatherman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MERTON
    has anyone else noticed the really poor welds? is it just my frame or do ya'll notice poor weld quality too?

    Dude. What do you expect? The frame is sixty bucks. Granted, the welds are not high-end Litespeed quality, but it's not "poor" by any means. At least, not the ones I've seen.

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