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  1. #1
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    changing shifters on a Bianchi Volpe

    Greetings
    I’ve just had delivered a new Trekking handlebar and a pair of shimano 9 speed shifters to replace what came standard on the my Bianchi Volpe ( drop handlebars etc).


    I was wondering if it's a huge job to take apart the drop handlebars, tiagra shifters and brakes and set up the new trekking bar and shifters.

    Is it something that I could take on myself (no funds left) or should I let my LBS tackle the job?

    Also any recommendations of books that cover the basics of Bike repair so I can get myself educated before I take a long summer bike trip.


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Year-round cyclist
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    Are you mechanically handy or mechanically challenged? That makes all the difference !

    Basically, if you are handy, it's relatively easy to do, especially if you can look at 1-2 other bikes to see how they are set up.

    As for references, many recommend the Zinn book. A good web reference is the Park website. Sheldon Brown also covers a few sections (look through the Glossary).

    The trickiest part is to adjust the limit screws and the indexing, and to adjust the mechanical advantage of cantilever brakes. As long as you give yourself plenty of time, it should not be a problem. Besides, these are worthwile steps to learn for the road.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
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    I think that you should try to do it yourself. At the very least save yourself the cost of having the shop remove the old bar and replace it with the new one.

    Adjusting the derailleurs and brakes will be the trickest part of the job but, if your bike works right now, you shouldn't have to mess with anything but cable tension. Worst case, you can always get a shop to finish that part of the job.

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