Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-20-06, 02:19 PM   #1
niccolo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 59
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Installing a freewheel on a flip/flop hub

I have a flip flob hub which is fixed gear on one side. I want to install a freewheel on the other side. Is there a particular way to go about doing this? For example, do I need to use any special tools to install it (or to remove the freewheel later on). Since the bike has track ends, do have to adjust the spacing to make sure the chainline is straight or can I use the same spacing as I do for the fixed cog (the idea being that the freewheel is wider than the fixed cog).

Anything else I need to know before doing this? Thank you.
niccolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-06, 02:28 PM   #2
Sheldon Brown
Gone, but not forgotten
 
Sheldon Brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newtonville, Massachusetts
Bikes: See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
Posts: 2,301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by niccolo
I have a flip flob hub which is fixed gear on one side. I want to install a freewheel on the other side. Is there a particular way to go about doing this? For example, do I need to use any special tools to install it (or to remove the freewheel later on). Since the bike has track ends, do have to adjust the spacing to make sure the chainline is straight or can I use the same spacing as I do for the fixed cog (the idea being that the freewheel is wider than the fixed cog).
No tools are required to install a freewheel, just screw it on. What you need the tool for is to remove the freewheel 'cause when you try to unscrew it the ratchet will just spin around.

It would be prudent to put a bit of grease on the threads before screwing the freewheel on.

Singlespeed freewheels generally give pretty much the same chainline as normally installed track sprockets.

You can see a chart with some specific numbers for this on my chainline article:

http://sheldonbrown.com/chainline

However, you'll find that riding with the freewheel is less fun than fixed gear.

See: http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed

Sheldon "Coasting Is Bad For You" Brown
Code:
+-----------------------------------------+
|  Bicycling isn't supposed to hurt! See: |
|    http://sheldonbrown.com/pain.html    |
+-----------------------------------------+
Sheldon Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-06, 02:48 PM   #3
Landgolier
THIS SPACE FOR RENT
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,849
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sheldon don't tell no lies. Look at his chart when choosing your freewheel and cog, but if you already have the parts and there's a difference, make the cog happy and let the freewheel be off, don't split the difference. You care more about the cog, since a derailed chain on the fixed is way worse. For a while I accidentally had just about the most off combination you could get, and the freewheel was no worse off than pretty much any gear combo on a geared bike.

Also, be sure you get a BMX freewheel remover, not the regular 2 pin one that fits old suntour multispeed freewheels, or you'll have to grind it to make it fit. Not that I've ever had to do that, of course, I just, um, heard it from a friend
Landgolier is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:30 AM.