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  1. #1
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    Did Shimano make 600 clusters in cassette and freewheel?

    I have two wheelsets with Shimano 600EX hubs and "clusters" that looked superficially identical. Using the codes on the hubs I have a 1984 "cluster" part no MF-6207 and a 1988 "cluster" part no MF-6208.

    The strange thing is that the later part (MF-6208) is a freewheel. I know this as I have removed it from the hub with my trusty Park Tools freewheel extractor. After cleaning I can now see it has a "silver" coloured plated finish (cad???).

    The other "cluster" turned out to be different. I could not find any splines! Because it is an earlier part I had thought it must be a freewheel as well. But after researching this site and Sheldon Browne I think I have an early Shimano uniglide freehub cluster. The cluster is a matt black finish and has the notation "unscrew" with an arrow pointing in clockwise direction on the outer surface.

    Hints please on how to corectly remove this cluster (if that is what it is).

    Do I really have a 1984 uniglide cluster, and if so, why did Shimano make freewheels in the 600 groupset after they had introduced freehubs???

    Confused!

  2. #2
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    The cluster is a matt black finish and has the notation "unscrew" with an arrow pointing in clockwise direction on the outer surface.
    Are you sure the "unscrew" arrow points clockwise? That would make it unscrew from pedaling forces.

    I'm not at all sure about this but I believe the original Uniglide freehub cassettes were held together by a thread-on small cog instead of a lockring.

  3. #3
    Senior Member grolby's Avatar
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    It's probably a Uniglide cassette, which as HillRider says is held on by the threaded small cog, not a lock ring. You may just be able to see the threads on the freehub body if you look carefully at the very end of it. Two chainwhips are generally used to take a Uniglide cassette off a hub - one to unscrew the small cog while the other immobilizes the freehub body and prevents it from turning backwards.

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=HillRider]Are you sure the "unscrew" arrow points clockwise? That would make it unscrew from pedaling forces.

    DEFINITELY clockwise - direction of travel. Just cheked again

  5. #5
    cycles per second Gonzo Bob's Avatar
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    It sounds like a Uniglide hub. The "arrows" aren't the unscrewing direction but probably the markers for the "indexing" direction. Some cogs may actually say "Index" on them. Oh, wait, 1984 was before indexing. So the arrow is just a marker to indicate which way to install the cog. But since the Uniglide freehub splines are completely symmetrical and the Uniglide twist tooth design is too, technically you can flip the cogs over (except for the cogs with built-in spacers) and get twice the life out of them.

    Uniglide freehubs have been around since 5-speed days and Shimano made both cassette hubs and freewheel hubs for quite a while. Back in the 80's, bikes were often a mix of components. For example, in 1986 my brother bought a Trek 1500 with Shimano 600 brakes, shifters, and derailers, but Specialized cranks and hubs. Since it didn't come with Shimano hubs, the rear cogs were a Shimano 600 freewheel rather than a cassette.
    Last edited by Gonzo Bob; 04-24-06 at 10:47 AM.

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=Gonzo Bob]It sounds like a Uniglide hub. The "arrows" aren't the unscrewing direction but probably the markers for the "indexing" direction.

    If the arrow is not the unscrewing direction, why does it say "unscrew->". Surely that indicates the direction to apply force to remove???? although it seems curious that it is the drive direction, so would it not loosen with pedalling forces?

    Anyhow, how do I dismantle the thing???

  7. #7
    cycles per second Gonzo Bob's Avatar
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    It actually says "unscrew"? What does it say that on? The top cog? The dust cap on the freehub body? I have two 6-speed Uniglide freehubs (Deore and 105) and mine don't say "unscrew" on anything.

    If it's Uniglide, as others have said get two chain whips. Put one on the 2nd biggest cog to hold the freehub body and use the other to unthread the smallest cog in a counter clockwise direction. You could also do it with one chain whip with the wheel mounted in the bike. Put the bike's chain on the largest cog and unscrew the top cog with the chain whip.

  8. #8
    Elite Fred mollusk's Avatar
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    Actually this is an older style Shimano freewheel that takes a two prong freewheel removal tool. Here is a link to a picture of one still being made by Bicycle Research:

    http://wheelandsprocket.com/page.cfm...ils&sku=TL2016

    I think you would have better luck modding a Park FR-2 freewheel removal tool (Suntour 2-prong) because the metal for the Bicycle Research tool is pretty soft. I have one with a sheared off prong. The inside diameter of the BR "Shimano" tool is the same as the Park FR-2, but the prongs are a little beefier on the Park FR-2 in every dimension. A little bit of grinding should get you a serviceable tool.
    I'm the world's forgotten boy. The one who's searchin', searchin' to destroy.

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=dukerider]
    Quote Originally Posted by Gonzo Bob
    It sounds like a Uniglide hub. The "arrows" aren't the unscrewing direction but probably the markers for the "indexing" direction.

    If the arrow is not the unscrewing direction, why does it say "unscrew->". Surely that indicates the direction to apply force to remove???? although it seems curious that it is the drive direction, so would it not loosen with pedalling forces?

    Anyhow, how do I dismantle the thing???
    If it's a cassette, the smallest cog spins off in a counter clockwise direction, regardless of how the arrow points. Use 2 chain whips. The wrong direction is probably only a bad tranlation from the original Japanese. As other have said, it might be an old freewheel, but if it is the notches are pretty obvious. If it has that bulge on the left side of the hub between the flanges, it's a cassette hub.

    em

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