Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    66
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Torque wrench for pedals? Confused.

    I'm confused about how to use a torque wrench for tightening pedals since you have to use a regular wrench, not a hex wrench. How does that work since the torque wrenches seem to be designed to work with hex or sockets. Hope this isn't too stupid a question....

  2. #2
    Senior Member thomson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,332
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most pedals have an allen (hex) bolt on the inside of the pedal (opposite side of the crankarm from the pedal)

    However, I have not heard of anyone being so precise in tightening pedals. Lube the threads, finger tighten them, and then use a wrench to gently snug them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    66
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks. I've just seen torque mentioned a lot and wanted to not screw anything up..too badly...

  4. #4
    Senior Member thomson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,332
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mo-bile
    Thanks. I've just seen torque mentioned a lot and wanted to not screw anything up..too badly...
    I understand the concern. I have seen a lot of pedals tightened too much. Just go easy. Think "snug" not "tight".

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,656
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For pedals without inside hexes, there is a tool called a "Crow's Foot Wrench" which is an off-set open end wrench with a square hole to take a ratchet or extension. These are used with torque wrenches on bolts thet aren't accessable to sockets or hex bits.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Snug is good, but heres another way of measuring the torque using a combination wrench and a fish scale.

    Measure the distance from the center of the closed end to the center of the open end of the wrench in inches and fractions of. take the ft-lbs specification, multiply by 12 to get inch pounds, and divide by the inches you measured, that the number of pounds you will measure with the fish scale.

    Put the open end on the pedal, hook the end of the fish scale into the closed end of the wrench and pull perpendicularly to the wrench until you reach the pounds you calculated above.
    Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

    1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
    1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
    1988 Ducati 750 F1

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    66
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Part of my confusion re how tight to tighten them was that when I took the existing pedals off, I could barely get them undone, they were on so tight.

  8. #8
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe they weren't greased?

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,656
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mo-bile
    Part of my confusion re how tight to tighten them was that when I took the existing pedals off, I could barely get them undone, they were on so tight.
    I've come across that often. For some reason some owners and/or mechanics seem to think that they have to tighten pedals to fabulous torque settings. I have no idea why. You want them good and snug but there is no reason to tighten them super hard.

    I tighten mine "snug" and never have to fight to remove them. Also, I have never had a pedal loosen by itself and have never had them damage the crank arm threads. If tight is good, tighter is not better.

  10. #10
    Prairie Path Commuter
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Forest Park, IL
    My Bikes
    Marin Palisades Trail
    Posts
    654
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The spec on my Crank Brother Mallet C pedals was 25-30 foot-pounds, and I tighted them to 27.5 ft-lbs, which to me felt more than "gently snug".

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,656
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by robmcl
    The spec on my Crank Brother Mallet C pedals was 25-30 foot-pounds, and I tighted them to 27.5 ft-lbs, which to me felt more than "gently snug".
    Agree, that is way past snug. Again, I have no idea why the torque spec is that high as it seems totally unnecessary. It approaches the specs for bottom brackets and crank arms where the torque spec does make sense.

  12. #12
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Finger tight or just seated with a wrench is enough. They are tight to come off since they get tighter with normal pedalling motion. That is why the left pedal is reverse thread.

  13. #13
    Senior Member spunkyruss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Hatfield, PA
    My Bikes
    '64 Schwinn Traveler, '73 Astra Tour de France, '79 Fuji Gran Tourer, '86 Dahon folder, '94 Specialized Hardrock, '95 GT Timberline, 2005 Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TSrider
    Finger tight or just seated with a wrench is enough.....
    I agree that you shoudn't go nuts when tightening pedals, but they need to be tighter than finger tight. This thread was started by somebody that stripped three sets of cranks before learning that pedals need to be more than hand-tightened.

    I think that it would help if Park Tool changed the name of the tool from "pedal wrench" to "pedal removal wrench." The large size of the tool only encourages people to tighten the hell out of them.

    Park Tool would benefit, too. They could sell a smaller wrench and call it a "pedal installation wrench." They already sell some tools of questionable need. It would fit right in.

  14. #14
    Senior Member caotropheus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Portugal-Israel
    Posts
    862
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spunkyruss
    I agree that you shoudn't go nuts when tightening pedals, but they need to be tighter than finger tight. This thread was started by somebody that stripped three sets of cranks before learning that pedals need to be more than hand-tightened.

    I think that it would help if Park Tool changed the name of the tool from "pedal wrench" to "pedal removal wrench." The large size of the tool only encourages people to tighten the hell out of them.

    Park Tool would benefit, too. They could sell a smaller wrench and call it a "pedal installation wrench." They already sell some tools of questionable need. It would fit right in.
    SR, I just saw experienced mechanics of loud sounded bicycle brands, tightening pedals with that famous Park wrench "pedal removal" tool. I saw this here in Israel and the most serious part is that they were doing this in carbon cranks!

  15. #15
    MADE IN HONG KONG
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    My Bikes
    some but not enough
    Posts
    1,763
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    clean and grease the threads, make sure that the "face" of the crank arm is clean and make sure the shoulder of the pedal axle is clean too.

    Tighten only with as much force as you are willing to exert to remove the pedal
    If your wrench is just under a foot, say 9 " , think 40#'s and you will be close enough

    Good contact between the shoulder of the pedal and and the face of the crank with some elastic deformation from preload is the key.
    If you are not having any fun, it's all your fault

  16. #16
    Very Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Yarramalong
    Posts
    208
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TSrider
    Finger tight or just seated with a wrench is enough. They are tight to come off since they get tighter with normal pedalling motion. That is why the left pedal is reverse thread.
    Actually I think the opposite is true.

    So why is the left pedal a left hand thread? Dunno.

  17. #17
    I eat carbide. Psimet2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Elgin, IL
    My Bikes
    Lots. Current sponsors - Giant and Specialized
    Posts
    19,294
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by miyata610
    Actually I think the opposite is true.

    So why is the left pedal a left hand thread? Dunno.
    Nope...sorry. Has to do with the reversing of force directions that ball bearings exert in the presence of friction.

    Check out this Thread about BB cup threading - I show a diagram for that scenario. Also there is a link from Sheldon Brown at the end.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    107
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The purpose of torquing is to induce sufficient bolt stretch and, by association, thread tension.

    Thing is, this is such a low-stress application that it doesn't matter. Just tighten them 'enough' + a quarter turn and don't worry. But absolutely do NOT overtighten.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    My Bikes
    Specialized FSR XC Pro, OLD Schwinn rigid MTB
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I attempted to torque mine, but the torque wrench only works in one direction! Since one of the pedals is threaded backwards, I couldn't torque it. I just got a feel for how tight one was, and applied similar force to the other.

    I try to torque fasteners whenever I can, especially when dealing with aluminum and composites. Learned this with auto repair long ago.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •