Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-01-06, 09:13 AM   #1
Miller2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southeast USA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Changing cassette

What is involved in changing a cassette from one set of wheels to another? Should I bother buying tools or just take it to a shop?
Miller2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-06, 09:21 AM   #2
erader
Senior Member
 
erader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: silicon valley
Bikes:
Posts: 1,774
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
providing both hubs are the same, it's very simple to swap a cassette. a shop can make the swap in a couple of minutes and that's probably cheaper than buying the tools...but not by much.

erader
erader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-06, 09:26 AM   #3
Miller2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southeast USA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erader
providing both hubs are the same, it's very simple to swap a cassette. a shop can make the swap in a couple of minutes and that's probably cheaper than buying the tools...but not by much.

erader
Thanks. Will the shifting need to be adjusted or will it shift the same as it did on the old wheels?
Miller2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-06, 09:26 AM   #4
genericbikedude
如果你能讀了這個你講中文
 
genericbikedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: New York
Bikes:
Posts: 3,542
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)



Chainwhips break, but if you have a chain tool they can be easily repaired. If you don't live near a bike co-op, and plan on biking for the life of more than three cassettes, it makes sense to buy tools.
genericbikedude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-06, 09:30 AM   #5
Sheldon Brown
Gone, but not forgotten
 
Sheldon Brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newtonville, Massachusetts
Bikes: See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
Posts: 2,301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miller2
What is involved in changing a cassette from one set of wheels to another? Should I bother buying tools or just take it to a shop?
Normally, you would use a special lockring tool and a chain whip.

There's also a special J.A. Stein self contained tool that is a bit less convenient, but works, mainly intended for on-the-road repairs. See: http://harriscyclery.com/tools/cassette.html

If you plan to do your own repair work on a regular basis, it's nice to have the tools. It is not a difficult job.

However, from a simple cost perspective, if you only need this done once, it would certainly be cheaper to have a shop do it.

To get the best price, you should bring just the two wheels in to the shop, preferably with the skewers removed. That should make it a very quick, most likely while-you-wait job. Depending on your relationship with your shop, you might not even get charged for such a simple thing.

On the other hand, if you bring in a wheel and a whole bike, it becomes much more of a hassle for the shop, and you're likely to need to leave it off, and will certainly be charged more considering the extra labor involved.

Sheldon "Any Excuse To Buy A New Tool" Brown
Code:
+---------------------------------------------------------+
|    We can be knowledgeable with other men's knowledge,  |
|    but we cannot be wise with other men's wisdom.       |
|                                 -- Michel de Montaigne  |
+---------------------------------------------------------+
Sheldon Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-06, 09:48 AM   #6
Miller2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southeast USA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
Normally, you would use a special lockring tool and a chain whip.

There's also a special J.A. Stein self contained tool that is a bit less convenient, but works, mainly intended for on-the-road repairs. See: http://harriscyclery.com/tools/cassette.html

If you plan to do your own repair work on a regular basis, it's nice to have the tools. It is not a difficult job.

However, from a simple cost perspective, if you only need this done once, it would certainly be cheaper to have a shop do it.

To get the best price, you should bring just the two wheels in to the shop, preferably with the skewers removed. That should make it a very quick, most likely while-you-wait job. Depending on your relationship with your shop, you might not even get charged for such a simple thing.

On the other hand, if you bring in a wheel and a whole bike, it becomes much more of a hassle for the shop, and you're likely to need to leave it off, and will certainly be charged more considering the extra labor involved.

Sheldon "Any Excuse To Buy A New Tool" Brown
Code:
+---------------------------------------------------------+
|    We can be knowledgeable with other men's knowledge,  |
|    but we cannot be wise with other men's wisdom.       |
|                                 -- Michel de Montaigne  |
+---------------------------------------------------------+
Thanks! Looks like I'll take it to the shop.
Miller2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:35 AM.