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  1. #1
    squareone
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    Help! Seized Pedal

    I got a new set of pedals and can't wait to ride with them. Problem is, one of my old pedals is seized on. It's a stainless thread on an aluminum crank arm. The spindle is round with no flat area for a pedal wrench, just a 6mm allen bolt. I've tried everything I know - WD-40, heat, wailing on it - and took it to a local mechanic who bent three allen wrenches before throwing me out.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcdebow
    I got a new set of pedals and can't wait to ride with them. Problem is, one of my old pedals is seized on. It's a stainless thread on an aluminum crank arm. The spindle is round with no flat area for a pedal wrench, just a 6mm allen bolt. I've tried everything I know - WD-40, heat, wailing on it - and took it to a local mechanic who bent three allen wrenches before throwing me out.

    Any ideas?
    Bummer it doesn't have flats. Just to be sure, make sure you're turning the threads in the right direction. (I assume the local mechanic knew one side is left hand/reverse thread).

    I had a similar experience recently, but had wrench flats and a good pedal wrench. A soaking of WD40 did not work for me. I tried a penetrant (by Liquid Wrench), let it soak in for a couple of hours, and the pedal finally released. Boy, did it was sure satisfying when the threads started to turn. WD40 is too "multipurpose" to be good at any one purpose. Other posters use PB Blaster to remove seized threads and love the stuff. To prevent future seizures, I loosen and tighten the pedal ever 3 months or so, and apply grease to the threads.

    You might also want to try to use a socket bit with hex head, and use a good long breaker bar to remove the pedal. I doubt you can generate enough torque with a hex/allen wrench designed to fit in the hand. When removing a stuck fastener, it's usually a better idea to use leverage and long "steady" force, than to whack at a wrench with a hammer.

    Becareful not to damage the wrench opening on the pedal.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member spunkyruss's Avatar
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    I would try soaking it in a good penetrant for at least a day or so first, but have you considered destructive removal of the old pedal, or at least removing the pedal body from the spindle?

    You might be able to get a pipe wrench on the spindle, between the bearings. If all else fails, you could grind some flats on the spindle and use a BIG adjustable wrench or clamp it in a vice.

    I can't think of many things that are more satisfying than a good destructive removal.

  4. #4
    8speed DinoSORAs Ed Holland's Avatar
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    Pour boiling water over the crank end and pedal spindle, plenty of it, don't be shy use plenty, then attempt to unscrew it by your chosen method before it cools. spunkyruss suggests some good tactics for "getting a grip". This worked for me in the past.

    Be sure to grease the spindles on the new pedals....

    Good luck,

    Ed
    Get a bicycle. You will certainly not regret it, if you live.

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