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Old 05-10-06, 12:04 AM   #1
bonkerz
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Making my bike lighter?

So I have a 2002 Kona Stinky Nine DH bike and the thing is HEAVY! I weighed it at just under 50 pounds. I do realize that this bike is suppose to be naturally heavy however I would like to lighten it up a bit. It is pretty much stock, and the specifications are here... http://www.bikesdetails.info/Kona_Stinky_Nine_2002.html The only difference being that there is a Monster Triple on it, and not the Shiver DC as listed.

So anyway, I'm not very smart when it comes to bike mechanics and/or knowing parts very well at all, I just like to ride haha. I have been reading more magazines lately to try and get some knowledge. But I thought I'd ask here.

Sooo.. I'm thinking I would like to drop almost 10 pounds off the thing, is this at all possible, and what do you recommend changing? What are the heaviest parts that can possibly be changed out to make the biggest differences? Remember though this is DH/FR type bike and I use it as so, so I need durable part recommendations please!!
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Old 05-10-06, 12:59 AM   #2
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Christ! no two of my bikes weigh 50 pounds together...I'm certainly no DH expert (nor have I ever ridden or wrenched on one) but I seriously doubt that you'll be able to drop 10 pounds without dishing out thousands of dollars. The heavy parts of a DH bike are a super-beefy frame, and strong suspension components with lots of travel. Look at other similar bikes spec sheets (and add 10% to get the real weight from posted). See what parts they use. You could get titanium stem and bars and seatpost and maybe drop a pound or two. Lightweight tires would also be helpful. Other than that, I've got nothing.
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Old 05-10-06, 02:15 AM   #3
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Why would you want to drop weight off a DH bike? A lot of these bikes have rings of solid steel around the rims to ADD more weight...
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Old 05-10-06, 06:44 AM   #4
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Sounds like you bought the wrong bike for your needs. You will be able to buy the right bike (at least a moderately-priced one) cheaper than you will be able to retrofit this one. What kind of riding do you mostly do?
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Old 05-10-06, 08:32 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
Why would you want to drop weight off a DH bike? A lot of these bikes have rings of solid steel around the rims to ADD more weight...
Because I find 50 pounds is just to heavy for me.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Landgolier
Sounds like you bought the wrong bike for your needs. You will be able to buy the right bike (at least a moderately-priced one) cheaper than you will be able to retrofit this one. What kind of riding do you mostly do?
Yeah that maybe true. Maybe I just need to get more used to it, I am coming off a less travel, smaller KHS witchdoctor, which I found to be great for trail riding but horrible for the drops and jumps I like to do.

I think one of the biggest things is I'm having a hard time with the front end. I'm not used to such a big bulky fork. I'm not exactly sure the weight of the Monster Triple though I am guessing around 3.5kg. I think I may lighten that up with a Boxxer World Cup. Will the Boxxer hold up fine to 8-10 foot drops? As that is about my limit at the moment hah.

Either way, I love the frame and want to keep it for a little while longer so I do plan on buying a lot of new components and then getting a new frame in the long run.
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Old 05-10-06, 08:44 AM   #6
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I agree. Different bike. Go used -- there are tons and tons of great used MTBs out there for cheap.

If you must modify your existing bike to lose weight, replace the frame (hard tail), fork, wheels, and tires.
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Old 05-10-06, 10:32 AM   #7
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fork and wheels. The montster T is notoriously heavy. Manitou has lots of lighter weight options that will hold up well. also try to lighten up on the front wheels. Dropping a a pound off the front end of a freeride bike is much more noticeable in the drops than dropping three pounds evenly over the entire bike.
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Old 05-10-06, 10:58 AM   #8
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I read a quote from Gary Fisher once, "every bike is a compromise." And it's true, you can't have it all. Downhill bikes are made to go, well, downhill of course, so the usual concerns regarding light weight and pedaling uphill aren't factored in. It sounds like the bike is too heavy for you, though, in the sense that you don't like the way it handles at 50 lbs. Yes, you can lighten it up by switching to different wheels, tires, suspension components, etc., all of which will add up to big bucks and still probably won't come close to the ten pound weight savings you're hoping for. I'd suggest a different bike, maybe a "freeride" bike instead of a full-on downhill rig. Still capable of big hits, but at least designed to be pedaled over varied terrain..........A compromise.
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