Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Si Senior dbg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    My Bikes
    Too Numerous (not)
    Posts
    2,444
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    finishing a bar wrap

    Boy, I've just never liked the electrical tape type stuff they supply with bar wrap. It doesn't stay on. It gets wrinkled or twisted. It's ugly. I've been borrowing a technique from ancient golf clubmaking called "whipping." ("ancient" because nobody uses actual wooden woods anymore, and the metals don't need whipping)

    I've supplied a picture here. It uses nylon cord with each end tucked under the previous turns. There's a special (simple) technique to turn the ends under. The picture shown was a little more tedious because the wrap stopped at one of those in-line brakes on the bar tops.

    I wonder if others have favorite ways besides that yucky electrical tape stuff,
    Attached Images Attached Images
    David Green, Naperville, IL USA "The older I get, the better I used to be" --Lee Trevino

  2. #2
    THIS SPACE FOR RENT
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,849
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Back In The Day™ they were all done like this, using hemp or cotton twine that was then shellaced. Amazing decorative wraps are possible, as well, check out a custom-made fishing rod some time.
    "I don't buy new frames, it just encourages them."

    -T.G.

  3. #3
    Coyote!
    Guest
    Hey Dbg,

    Too cool! You're right about the electrical tape. . .seems like a ratty way to finish an otherwise neat process. Man, I'm already lookin' for an excuse to use it! Simplicity itself.

    BTW, is this what you're talking about?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_whipping or
    http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg

  4. #4
    Ferrous wheel
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Orleans
    My Bikes
    2004 Gunnar Rock Hound MTB; 1988 Gitane Team Pro road bike; 1986-ish Raleigh USA Grand Prix; mid-'80s Univega Gran Tourismo with Xtracycle Free Radical
    Posts
    1,388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use hemp twine, as mentioned above.
    One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach -- all the damn vampires.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    26,169
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Landgolier
    Back In The Day™ they were all done like this, using hemp or cotton twine that was then shellaced. Amazing decorative wraps are possible, as well, check out a custom-made fishing rod some time.
    Right. I used to make fishing rods and the decorative thread work shown in some of the trade magazines was staggering in its complexity.

  6. #6
    Si Senior dbg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    My Bikes
    Too Numerous (not)
    Posts
    2,444
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Coyote!
    Hey Dbg,

    Too cool! You're right about the electrical tape. . .seems like a ratty way to finish an otherwise neat process. Man, I'm already lookin' for an excuse to use it! Simplicity itself.

    BTW, is this what you're talking about?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_whipping or
    http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg
    That is an effective way. The golf club technique is a little different. You start with one end laid underneath and start your wrapping over it. That end eventually is completely covered. When you near the other end you lay a completely separate loop of the same material down and keep wrapping the last 10 or so turns over it. Pass the final end through the loop and pull the loop out. Now both ends will be tucked under the adjacent 10 turns or so. Trim if necessary but golf tradition usually cuts the final end so it will terminate under the previous turns. It is a very clean look.

    The other advice might be to use actual golf club whipping material (golfsmith.com or golfworks.com) because it is a little stretchy and a little tacky. Those qualities allow the tight whipping to hold onto itself.
    David Green, Naperville, IL USA "The older I get, the better I used to be" --Lee Trevino

  7. #7
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pinole, CA, USA
    Posts
    15,505
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just did the same thing with black braided shoe laces:

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/...68014369jHohCP

    Cowhorn bars should be wrapped starting from the center to keep the edges of the tape oriented the right way since they're " backwards".

  8. #8
    Perineal Pressurized dobber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    In Ebritated
    Posts
    6,557
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dbg
    That is an effective way. The golf club technique is a little different. You start with one end laid underneath and start your wrapping over it. That end eventually is completely covered. When you near the other end you lay a completely separate loop of the same material down and keep wrapping the last 10 or so turns over it. Pass the final end through the loop and pull the loop out. Now both ends will be tucked under the adjacent 10 turns or so. Trim if necessary but golf tradition usually cuts the final end so it will terminate under the previous turns. It is a very clean look.
    Thanks for the description, now I can visualize the process.
    This is Africa, 1943. War spits out its violence overhead and the sandy graveyard swallows it up. Her name is King Nine, B-25, medium bomber, Twelfth Air Force. On a hot, still morning she took off from Tunisia to bomb the southern tip of Italy. An errant piece of flak tore a hole in a wing tank and, like a wounded bird, this is where she landed, not to return on this day, or any other day.

  9. #9
    Senior Member hodadmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wenatchee, WA
    Posts
    170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dobber
    Thanks for the description, now I can visualize the process.
    Dig out the trusty Boy Scout Handbook for a diagram of whipping rope, it's no different from a handlebar application. It's still a Tenderfoot requirement in the current book.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pinole, CA, USA
    Posts
    15,505
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I brush on Elmer's glue to bind it all together so it can't come loose and then shellac it to make it water proof.

  11. #11
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,096
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, anyone who was in the Boy Scouts ought to know how to do whipping (at least we did 50 years ago). However, what I do is secure the end of the tape with crazy glue (too lazy to look up the spelling of the proper term) and then just cover it with the sticky tape provided (or electrical tape if you like).

    Of course, if you tape your bars the easy (wrong) way, finishing at the ends, you don't have to worry about this.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
    1977 Nishiki Landau
    1967 Jeunet Captivante track bike
    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
    "index shifters = frets on a fiddle"

  12. #12
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco California
    My Bikes
    Waterford 953 RS-22
    Posts
    8,964
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OLDYELLR
    Of course, if you tape your bars the easy (wrong) way, finishing at the ends, you don't have to worry about this.
    I've done it the "wrong" way for years; I start at the head and finish at the ends using shrink tubing.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    - Stan

  13. #13
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pinole, CA, USA
    Posts
    15,505
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did it the wrong way since I was taught to do it that way when I worked in a bike shop in the late '70s. Someone recently pointed out to me that your hands tend to lift the edges of the tape on the drops when they're wrapped that way. He was right, but it was never a problem for me because I don't use the drops that much.

  14. #14
    Castiron Perineum Bockman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Taking a tip from Siu Blue Wind, I too am typing a lengthy passage of text down here to demonstrate the enormous amount of space available should one wish to use it-- in sharp contrast to the avatar text above this part.
    My Bikes
    '06 Salsa Campeon, '84 Cannondale R1000, 80's Nishiki Ariel
    Posts
    1,191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry for the huge photo... One nice way to finish it off with tape is to roll the stem-side edge over before wrapping:

    The best libertarian podcast on the internet! freedomainradio.com

  15. #15
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,096
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see where Scooper uses barcon shifters and probably spends more time riding down on the drops. In this case the "wrong" way may be better, because his hands are not pushing against the exposed edge of the tape. Yes, most new bikes have tape wrapped this way because it's easier and cheaper. It takes more time and skill to finish the wrapping in the middle, so I can see why a bike shop wouldn't want their employees spending time doing it that way. I used to start from the middle also for decades until I found out why the tape kept separating at the first bend and started doing it the "right" way. I used to ride down on the drops when I raced, but nowadays I spend 99% of the time on the tops, the first bend or the brake hoods, which is why I wrap the tape the way I do.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
    1977 Nishiki Landau
    1967 Jeunet Captivante track bike
    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
    "index shifters = frets on a fiddle"

  16. #16
    aspiring Old Wart Sluggo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Left bank, Knoxville TN
    Posts
    455
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you start in the middle, you can stuff the end under the end plugs (a little trickier with bar end shifters, but still possible). This is the easiest and most elegant way to do it. Anything else is makeshift, even if elaborate.

    I use cloth tape. Maybe this approach won't work with the thick plastic stuff.

  17. #17
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Regular electrical tape is fine, the wire bounding stuff looks kind of excessive imho. Especially the bar tape protruding past said bound.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    455
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    electrical tape, i love. it's a clean end to it. Plus I use it to tape on beer bottle caps as bar ends. hehe

  19. #19
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pinole, CA, USA
    Posts
    15,505
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some people just don't get it.

  20. #20
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nausea, New Hamster
    My Bikes
    (see http://wildavis.smugmug.com/Bikes) Bianchi Veloce (2005), Nishiki Cascade (1992), Schwinn Super Sport (1983)
    Posts
    1,572
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Electrical tape for finishing the ends. Also (as per ParkTools site), start drops at the end using reversed electrical tape to add durability to those bits which get extra wear. I used reversed electrical tape for the top bends of the bars also; it adds extra thickness to the wrap making the bars more comfortable.

    Here's how I finished the Trekking bars on my MTB:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "………………………" - Marcel Marceau

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •