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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Inside of hub part?

    Hi,
    My brother bikes has messed up... I am sure it is the part inside the hub, what is this part called?
    The problem is, when you try and pedal, it just doesn't move! The chain spins, and is on correctly, but the bike just doesn't move. Am I right about the part messing up? And how much would it cost? And what is it called??? It is only a cheapy bike, so we don't want to be paying out a load...

    Just another random question, can I over tighten a quick release? I always make sure it is tight, but can I make it too tight?

    I am only 14 so that is why I may seem a bit, well, a lot noobish...

    Thanks in advance for any help, it would be much apreciated..

    Joe.

  2. #2
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Pawls. And uh, if it's a cheap hub

    1) part not available
    2) cheaper to buy new hub
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Here's a demo movie showing how to fasten the quick release: http://www.omnicast.net/~tmcfadden/QR_useage.wmv It's a 2MB movie file in Windows Media Player format, hope that works for you. Right-click the link and Save Target As, then play it after it downloads.

    In the video, notice how the lever says "OPEN" on one side, and "CLOSED" on the other. I first point the quick-release lever straight out, then tighten the nut on the other side until it's snug, and then force the lever into the fully-closed position. It should "bite" pretty firmly; you can see how I have to use considerable force with a 36-year-old thumb to close it

    If you can close the lever with your index finger, it's not biting hard enough to keep the wheel secure. If you can barely close it even when pushing with the palm of your hand, it's a bit too tight. You can adjust the "bite" tighter or looser by turning the nut on the opposite end. If in doubt, get a second opinion from an experienced person such as a bike-shop mechanic.

  4. #4
    cab horn
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    It's unforutnate that that rack gets in the way of showing the proper way of tightening a QR.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  5. #5
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator
    It's unforutnate that that rack gets in the way of showing the proper way of tightening a QR.
    Feel free to post your preferred method, operator. What counts is that the QR is adjusted so that it clamps the wheel into the dropouts well. After 10+ years as a bicycle mechanic, trying various methods of explaining to newbies how to fasten their wheel QRs, I settled on this method because it proved easy to learn and got the desired results.

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