Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    not a bike lane in sight, TX
    Posts
    300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Another 27" World Sport Question, Brakes

    I have been turning an old Schwinn World Sport into a real machine, maiinly because I am in love with the frame, not the hardware. I just upgraded to some old Shimano 105 brake levers which are fantastic.
    I was curious to see if I could use old Shimano Ultegra or 105 brake calpiers on 27" wheels. Everything else on the bike was decent Shimano except for some crappo calipers. Will the new/used (that means cheap ebay) calipers correspond with the wheels? Will I run into issues with brake pad alignment issues with the wheels?
    Thanks
    j

  2. #2
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    not a bike lane in sight, TX
    Posts
    300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Shimano 105 vs. 27" wheels.
    Bump!

  3. #3
    Gone, but not forgotten Sheldon Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Newtonville, Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
    Posts
    2,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by evictionsurplus
    I have been turning an old Schwinn World Sport into a real machine, maiinly because I am in love with the frame, not the hardware. I just upgraded to some old Shimano 105 brake levers which are fantastic.
    I was curious to see if I could use old Shimano Ultegra or 105 brake calpiers on 27" wheels. Everything else on the bike was decent Shimano except for some crappo calipers. Will the new/used (that means cheap ebay) calipers correspond with the wheels? Will I run into issues with brake pad alignment issues with the wheels?
    You need to measure the reach as explained at: http://sheldonbrown.com/reach

    It is unlikely that any current Shimano calipers will work on this bike.

    A caliper brake system consists of 4 parts:

    •The levers
    •The cables
    •The calipers
    •The brake shoes

    All of these parts are upgradable. Many people think first of replacing the calipers, but, in fact, this is the least likely part to make any real difference. A caliper is a simple leverage unit, and there's not all that much to one.

    In the case of older bikes, it can be difficult to find a new caliper that will even fit.

    The other 3 parts are much more likely to yield real improvement.

    •The levers

    Older designs had the cables exit up from the front of the brake levers, arching over the
    handlebars. The newer style, where the cable exits out the back of the lever and runs under the handlebar tape is referred to as "aero" because it eliminates the wind drag of the exposed cables.

    Aero levers are generally a major improvement over the older type. The pivots are located differently, making it possible to get fairly serious braking from the position where the rider's hand is on top of the lever hood. Traditional levers would permit the use of this position for gentle deceleration only.

    Additionally, the better aero levers have better internal cable routing, so there's less cable friction. I particularly recommend the Shimano Tiagra units we sell for $39.95, including cables. See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/brakes.html#leversdrop

    •The cables

    Older cables used metal-to-metal contact as the inner cable slid through the spiral-wound steel housing. Lubricant was by grease, if the mechanic was conscientious.

    Modern cable housings have a Teflon or similar lining. The better inner cables are stainless steel, and are "die drawn" to make them smoother. The result is greatly reduced cable friction, so more of your finger strength is transmitted to the caliper, rather than wasted overcoming cable friction.

    •The brake shoes

    Modern high-performance brake shoes also make a considerable difference. The very best is the ugly salmon-colored material originated by Scott-Mathauser, and now sold under the Kool Stop name. See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/brakeshoes.html

    Sheldon "Calipers Last" Brown
    [COLOR=blue][CENTER][b]Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts[/b]
    Phone 617-244-9772, FAX 617-244-1041
    [URL= http://harriscyclery.com] http://harriscyclery.com[/URL]
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    [URL=http://captainbike.com]http://captainbike.com[/URL]
    Useful articles about bicycles and cycling
    [URL=http://sheldonbrown.com]http://sheldonbrown.com[/URL] [/CENTER] [/COLOR]

  4. #4
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,876
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think it's so much that you're running 27" wheels (which I assume are the stock size on the bike), but that the "standard reach" brakes from that era are roughly equal to the "long reach" brakes of today, and the bike's brake bridge and fork crown are at a distance from the rim that requires a longer reach brake than the 105's you installed. If you were to convert to 700c rims, you'd have an even greater problem in trying to reach the rims with the brakes (4mm more problem, to be exact). I suggest trying to find some modern "long reach" dual pivot brakes, if you want to go to a more modern design than the old single pivot sidepulls you probably have on the bike now. Another option would be to find some old, or NOS, centerpulls on ebay (Dia Compe or Weinmans), which are a more robust design than the single pivot sidepulls, and might (or might not) increase your braking power, but will have plenty of reach for your bike's design and would almost certainly reach the rims if you ever decide to go to 700c. Centerpulls will be easier to keep centered over the rim than the old sidepulls, but it's arguable whether they provide more braking power. Personally, I like centerpulls and they give me all the braking power I need, but others may disagree. Good luck-

  5. #5
    Yet another vegan biker
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Trapped behind the corn curtain
    My Bikes
    Sakae Prism, Vintage Fuji bike(S), too many bikes, one from scratch bike.
    Posts
    965
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Have you thought about mt bike levers? If this is a city bike then you might want to try them.

    I put some on my 82 Le Tour. The mt bike levers gave me considerably more power.


  6. #6
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    not a bike lane in sight, TX
    Posts
    300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What about TT levers? They are cheap and would probably work well with the moustache bars I am using. A setup much like silversmith's Le Tour, which I find lovely btw
    j.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •