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  1. #1
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    The best way to get what I want - please give me your $0.02

    I finally moved to a new place and I do not need to drive 88 miles each way to attend classes. Now I have a nice paved bike path about 8 miles each way that I would like to commute and use my car only when severe weather makes things dangerous (I'm in Tampa Bay, FL - Hurricanes, Tornadoes, you know...)

    I have a list of features that I would like my bike to have or at least have the potential for upgrade later on. Her eit is:

    700c wheels

    flat handle bar with some form of extensions (maybe a trekking handlebar, maybe the classic extensions)

    Fenders

    Rear Rack

    Disk Brakes or some VERY EFFICIENT brakes under any kind of circumstances (Usually wet)

    ability to, in the future, hold a Rohlof 14 internal Hub gear

    No rear suspension (a Thudbuster seat will do fine)

    Based on that, What do you guys recommend: Buy a new bike like a Gary Fisher Utopia and add my stuff, buy an used Mountain Bike that has fenders/rear rack capabilities, buy a frame and start from scratch or actually, this bike exist and I am just having a hard time to find?

    Budget is sub 1000 (with everything besides the Rohlof Hub). This bike will be used as the Battle Tank for a sub 20 miles daily commute and some longer rides (30-60) on weekends. Mostly paved but road bikes may not do well on the road conditions that I may find. Being able to do a century confortable wouldn't hurt.

    Thank you for sharing your wisdom.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rafael Guerra
    ...I would like to commute and use my car only when severe weather makes things dangerous (I'm in Tampa Bay, FL - Hurricanes, Tornadoes, you know...)
    Fenders
    Disk Brakes or some VERY EFFICIENT brakes under any kind of circumstances (Usually wet)
    Rafael, I'm just curious: if Tampa typically doesn't get much rain and your main weather concerns are hurricanes and tornadoes, why are brake efficiency and fenders so critical? If the forecast is so dire, you're not likely to be out riding your bike--you'll be too busy boarding up your windows.

  4. #4
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    Tampa gets rain every afternoon. Every afternoon.

  5. #5
    Neat - w/ ice on the side dalmore's Avatar
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    usually about 3:30 when I'm visiting.
    Current favorite bumper sticker: Wag more. Bark less.

    Change you can believe in - Bigfoot Nessie 08

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    From your description, it sounds like there are many available hybrid bikes that would meet your requirements and budget. Check the Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, Fuji, etc. web sites and dealers. Surley, as noted is also a good bet.

  7. #7
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    When it is not raining, there are the sprinclers and the billion-gallons of water on my pathway...

  8. #8
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    You could start with a touring frame or almost any 1960s or early 1970s frame and build up what you want. Most older frames accommodate wider tires, such as 700Cx28mm or even 700Cx32mm, which I would recommend for your application. (I commute very happily on 27x1-3/8" knobbies, for which my old Peugeot UO-8 klunker has ample clearance.)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
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  9. #9
    The quieter you become... Falkon's Avatar
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    I ride an old Ciocc racing bike outfitted with rack and panniers and I LOVE it.

    What's your price range?

  10. #10
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falkon
    What's your price range?
    Budget is sub 1000 (with everything besides the Rohlof Hub).

  11. #11
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    I would go with a touring frame (maybe the surley long haul trucker) and canti brakes. Forget the thudbuster post, go with a sprung Brooks.

  12. #12
    The quieter you become... Falkon's Avatar
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    Fuji Crosstown 1.0

    FRAMESET: Altair 1 aluminum
    MSRP (USD) $520.00
    FORK: RST CT-COM2 with 50mm travel
    DRIVETRAIN: SR Suntour CR400 forged aluminum crankset, Shimano Deore derailleurs
    WHEELS/TIRES: Formula sealed forged aluminum hubs, 36H with Kenda K-934 hybrid, 700 x 35c
    BRAKESET: ProMax aluminum, linear pull
    EXTRAS: Equipped with fenders, rack mounts and a comfort seat post
    SIZES: 15", 17", 19", 21", 23"
    COLOR: Gloss Black
    WEIGHT: 32.2 lbs / 14.61 kg

    Felt SRD92

    COLOR
    Pewter
    SIZES
    650c x 47, 700c x 50,53,56,59,62
    FRAME
    Felt 7005 F-Lite Double-butted aluminum frame, forged dropouts, replaceable hanger with fender and rear rack mounts
    FORK
    Felt Carbon with 1-1/8” CrMo Steerer
    HEADSET
    Aheadset 1-1/8”
    STEM
    Felt AD-22 Alloy Forged Adjustable
    HANDLEBAR
    Felt Alloy Ergonomic Drop, Ø31.8mm
    SHIFTERS
    Shimano Sora, 24 speed
    F/DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Sora
    R/DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Tiagra
    CRANKSET
    FSA/RPM 3-PC Alloy, 52/42/30T
    CHAIN
    Z92 Silver
    FREEWHEEL
    Shimano 8-Speed Cassette, 12-25T
    BRAKE LEVERS
    Shimano ST-R220 with Tektro Bar Top Levers
    BRAKES
    Long Reach Dual Pivot with Cartridge Brake Pads
    SADDLE
    Felt Anatomic Comfort Design with Dual Density Base and CrMo Rails
    SEAT POST
    Felt Carbon/Alloy Micro-Adjust
    RIMS
    Alex ALX-R450 Aluminum Double-Wall Rims with CSW Braking Surface
    TIRE
    Felt Inertia with Flat Protection 700c x 28 (650c x 26)
    SPOKES
    Stainless 14G
    PEDALS
    Dual Sided Pedal, Aluminum Clipless One Side Flat One Side
    MSRP
    $739 [we sell it for much less]

    That felt is very nice for being light and equipped.

    Fuji Cross Comp

    FRAMESET: Altair 2 lite custom butted aluminum w/ integrated head tube
    FORK: FC-990 Fuji bonded carbon cross w/ 1 1/8" Cro-Moly steerer
    DRIVETRAIN: New TruVativ Elita Cross BXP, 39/48T chainring, Shimano & SRAM mix
    WHEELS: Alex DC-19, 32H double walled rims, double butted stainless spokes
    STEM, SEATPOST: Ritchey Logic Comp stem, Fuji Ultralite Alloy seatpost
    SIZES: 49cm, 52cm, 54cm, 56cm, 58cm, 61cm
    COLOR: White / Gloss Black
    WEIGHT: 21.6 lbs / 9.80 kg
    MSRP (USD) $1,070.00 [bike sells for around $800 at most shops]

    That's just three options. I liked the look of the Trek Portland as well, but I couldn't even find a price on them. I didn't list the Fuji Touring bike which is about $750, steel and weighs 28.6 lbs.

    Check around, but there's just three options for you.

  13. #13
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    the fuji shown is very upright, but I willcheck LBS for the other 2. Thank you for the suggestions.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    The Rohlof is your sticking point. And a stock bike with decent disc brakes under $1000 is also asking for a lot. If were you I'd seriously rethink the Rohlof add on and go for something like a Jamis Coda with Kool Stop salmon brake pads. Or you could buy something like the Coda and swap out the fork and add a disc brake.

    If you choose to go with a Rohlof in the future you should really use a frame that was meant to go with a Rohlof.

  15. #15
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziemas
    The Rohlof is your sticking point. And a stock bike with decent disc brakes under $1000 is also asking for a lot. If were you I'd seriously rethink the Rohlof add on and go for something like a Jamis Coda with Kool Stop salmon brake pads. ...
    Good advice for anyone who cares about bang for the buck.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  16. #16
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    If you are only going 8 miles each way along a bike path I doubt you will need much gear range- a rolhoff would be expensive overkill.

  17. #17
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    The reason I was considering an internal Hub was based on the fact that I want to learn how to be maintenance-independent from LBSs. But that is correct, if you think, I can take the bike twice a year for 10 years and still would be cheaper than the Rolhof.

    Thank you for sharing your opinions.

  18. #18
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rafael Guerra
    The reason I was considering an internal Hub was based on the fact that I want to learn how to be maintenance-independent from LBSs. But that is correct, if you think, I can take the bike twice a year for 10 years and still would be cheaper than the Rolhof.

    Thank you for sharing your opinions.
    Adjusting a derailleur isn't all that difficult and is an easy skill to pick up by reading an online how to. I wouldn't let a desire of not wanting to deal with LBS labor charges be the deciding factor in buying a pricy bit of kit (though by all accounts the Rolhofs are sweet).

  19. #19
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    I realized that there is a BIG difference between the 1000 dollar bikes and the 1400-1600 Bikes (bigger than between the 600 bikes to the 1000 bikes).

    Trek Soho, Specialized Sirrus Sport Disc and Jamis Koda may be the way I will go. Just will have to wait 'til the budget goes to 1500-1600 instead of 900-1000.

    Thank you again for all feedback. I am considering buying the "blue book", a bike stand and start learning more about bike's anatomy. After taking Advanced Neuro Anatomy (all about "wiring") and Oral and maxillo Facial Surgery (disassemblying and putting things back together better than before) it can't be THAT HARD.

  20. #20
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Bike maintnance is not only fairly easy (they are simple machines when it comes down to it), it is also a great deal of fun. If you want to really learn, build this bike up from the frame. It may cost a little more in the end (tools, etc.), but you will learn a great deal and have a bike that is all yours.

  21. #21
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barba
    Bike maintnance is not only fairly easy (they are simple machines when it comes down to it), it is also a great deal of fun. If you want to really learn, build this bike up from the frame. It may cost a little more in the end (tools, etc.), but you will learn a great deal and have a bike that is all yours.
    That would be a long shot for a beginner, but I am considering buying some 80 bucks garage sale Mal-Wart bike and break it down to the cell level to see what it is all about...

    Another problem that I have is time...full time job, full time student, still need time to share my love with my significant other...

  22. #22
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    It almost sounds like you are specing a serious trekking bike more than a commuter.

    Great suggestions above. I'd skip any suspension, unlikely you will need it with your riding. That will save money and weight. There are many more cheap suspensions than good ones and the good ones cost. The parts of Florida I have been in have maybe 20' of rise? No need for a disc brake unless you plan on hauling huge loads in the wet. Get better pads, the Kool Stop Salmons are widely seen as having some of the best stopping power for non disc brakes (it's all I have stopping me and wife on a tandem pulling ~120lbs of kids, stuff and trailer).

    You could easily (price wise) get what you want in the used market. Even if it is more road oriented, you could swap in a flat bar and other parts you want for relatively cheap and really put your mark on the bike. Deciding to modify components to what you want may be a bit much at this point but with the saved money you could probably still come out ahead if you had a shop do it. It may sound scary to do it yourself, but consider it an adventure into the cerebellum. Gross motor skills only, it's wrenching.

  23. #23
    cab horn
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    Sounds like what you really need is a fixed gear. With a disc brake front wheel. No cassettes, no gear shifters to buy, no derailleurs. Can't think of anything better as a commuter for 8 miles.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  24. #24
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator
    Sounds like what you really need is a fixed gear. With a disc brake front wheel. No cassettes, no gear shifters to buy, no derailleurs. Can't think of anything better as a commuter for 8 miles.
    Now there is an idea! Check out the Redline 925. If I was going to buy a commuter off the shelf, that would be the one.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    The Jamis Coda Comp is well within your price range at a MSRP of $825.
    http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/06_codacomp.html


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