Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-15-06, 03:20 PM   #1
spry
location:northern Ohio
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 3,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
carbon front forks??????

I just dont get it.Carbon ,Kevlar,Polyester resin to me doesnt make a $500 bike worth $5000.I have owned windsurf boards,and other carbon or Kevlar products,but these items were larger panel products used primarily for watercraft.When they chipped we patched the immediatly to awoid spydering cracks.How can bike axles be supported on 4 -1 inch carbon forks a be considered safe with the cracking and chipping factor inherent in these products.Is it all about saving a few grams?

Previous posts(cracked carbon forks), here have led me to ask these questions.Has anyone experienced sudden failure of cromoly,steel,alum.?Enlighten me please,for I feel like a round peg in a square bicycle industry.
spry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-06, 03:52 PM   #2
moxfyre
cyclist/gearhead/cycli...
 
moxfyre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: DC / Maryland suburbs
Bikes: Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
Posts: 4,166
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Carbon fiber is very high-zoot. If your bike isn't sufficiently high-zoot, it's practically impossible to enjoy riding it.

But seriously... I don't really get the point of carbon everything except for saving a small amount of weight. I have ridden with a carbon fork though and it has a nice feel to it, as well as being much lighter than a steel fork (about 600-700 grams lighter than my steel fork I'd say!). Carbon forks often have aluminum fork ends and aluminum steer tubes, but not always.
moxfyre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-06, 07:06 PM   #3
Wogster
Senior Member
 
Wogster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
Posts: 6,941
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by spry
I just dont get it.Carbon ,Kevlar,Polyester resin to me doesnt make a $500 bike worth $5000.I have owned windsurf boards,and other carbon or Kevlar products,but these items were larger panel products used primarily for watercraft.When they chipped we patched the immediatly to awoid spydering cracks.How can bike axles be supported on 4 -1 inch carbon forks a be considered safe with the cracking and chipping factor inherent in these products.Is it all about saving a few grams?

Previous posts(cracked carbon forks), here have led me to ask these questions.Has anyone experienced sudden failure of cromoly,steel,alum.?Enlighten me please,for I feel like a round peg in a square bicycle industry.
All frame materials have issues, steel that is kept dry and sealed, will last forever, however few steel frames are finished on the inside, and if a steel frame is left in a damp area like a garage, it could rust from the inside, and you might not realise that the paint is all that is holding you up. A steel bike could be treated with a rust inhibitor on the inside, but I don't think many bike makers do so.

Aluminum will not rust, it will oxidize but will not rust, but doesn't like flexing, and can flex to failure, which has been proven with aircraft. The average guy who digs the bike out a couple of times a year, will never flex a frame to failure although some of the 10,000 mile a year touring and car-free riders might, if the rest of the bike lasts that long.

Titanium doesn't suffer from rust or flexing problems, but it's expensive, and it is hard to work with for manufacturers, so nobody really uses it much these days. I expect though, in 5-10 years it will make a come back, probably when someone figures a way to make it cheaper and easier to work with.

CF doesn't rust, and it's easy to work with, doesn't have flexing issues (that we know about, anyway), but it;s fragile compared to metal. For racing bikes, it's a good way to go, for a commiuter or tourer much less so, seems to be making it's way into MTB's and that I think will create issues.
Wogster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-06, 07:44 PM   #4
bigbossman 
Dolce far niente
 
bigbossman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Northern CA
Bikes:
Posts: 10,777
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also, I don't recall seeing many carbon forks until aluminum frames became popular. Because of it's dampening properties, CF forks helped to tame the relatively harsh (compared to steel) ride of the alloy bikes. So you started seeing alloy bukes with CF forks, and then CF stays at a higher price point.
__________________
"Love is not the dying moan of a distant violin, itís the triumphant twang of a bedspring."

S. J. Perelman
bigbossman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-06, 08:51 PM   #5
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione
Posts: 28,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nice troll.
operator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 08:07 AM   #6
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by spry
I just dont get it.Carbon ,Kevlar,Polyester resin to me doesnt make a $500 bike worth $5000.I have owned windsurf boards,and other carbon or Kevlar products,but these items were larger panel products used primarily for watercraft.When they chipped we patched the immediatly to awoid spydering cracks.How can bike axles be supported on 4 -1 inch carbon forks a be considered safe with the cracking and chipping factor inherent in these products.Is it all about saving a few grams?

Previous posts(cracked carbon forks), here have led me to ask these questions.Has anyone experienced sudden failure of cromoly,steel,alum.?Enlighten me please,for I feel like a round peg in a square bicycle industry.
I agree. Steel makes sense for the forks that are so critical to the safety of a bike. Makes sense to make seat posts, seats, and maybe bars made from carbon or unobtanium since they are not critical, But I'm not paying $1000 extra for a few grams weight savings.
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 05:00 PM   #7
gruppo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Bend, OR
Bikes: American Breezer mtb, American Classic ti road bike w/SRAM Force and XO, Crotch Rocket, SOMA 69'er w/XX-1 mtb, Handsome Shop Bike w/700c wheels. Bianchi SS 'cross
Posts: 592
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If the goal is to have a very light bike then an all carbon fork would be part of the build kit (There's a good after market selection starting around $400). Besides a significant weight savings (As much as a pound under a steel fork with chromed crown), carbon forks have good vertical dampening qualities and minimal twist. However the evidence suggests they should be replaced after a hard crash, even if there's no noticeable damage. But I must admit I and others have not done this every time, and so far so good? In my experience, carbon forks (and stays) improve the ride quality of aluminum frames on long rides. I've noticed little or no improvement over a quality steel fork on a good steel frame. I don't know anyone, including me, who's using a steel fork on a ti frame. In the long run, there's still a good argument for using a high quality steel frame and fork as the foundation for your dream bike - and you can easily build it up in the 17 to 18 pound range if weight is an issue. So, if using a carbon fork causes fear and loathing, and having a 15 pound bike isn't the goal, then a steel fork is a more-than-worthy alternative.
gruppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 06:03 PM   #8
bigbossman 
Dolce far niente
 
bigbossman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Northern CA
Bikes:
Posts: 10,777
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by operator
Nice troll.

??????
__________________
"Love is not the dying moan of a distant violin, itís the triumphant twang of a bedspring."

S. J. Perelman
bigbossman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 08:23 PM   #9
spry
location:northern Ohio
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 3,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Zoot?????

Yes,I do want to be zoot!Carbon is out but I have mt eye on some glitter streamers for my drop bars and Elvis style,white sequined bike shorts and jersey.Wait till the other middle-aged roadies in Ohio get a gander at them.heehaw!!!!!!
spry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 09:28 PM   #10
catatonic
Chairman of the Bored
 
catatonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2004 Raleigh Talus, 2001 Motobecane Vent Noir (Custom build for heavy riders)
Posts: 5,825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thing is there is good carbon and bad carbon. I have a carbon fork that looks outright flimsy (Easton EC30), but in reality it's tank-like. Very stiff, strong, and a modest weight.

I am a CF believer, but I understand that it's not necessary...my current roadbike is mostly aluminum.
catatonic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-06, 10:33 PM   #11
moxfyre
cyclist/gearhead/cycli...
 
moxfyre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: DC / Maryland suburbs
Bikes: Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
Posts: 4,166
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by catatonic
Thing is there is good carbon and bad carbon. I have a carbon fork that looks outright flimsy (Easton EC30), but in reality it's tank-like. Very stiff, strong, and a modest weight.

I am a CF believer, but I understand that it's not necessary...my current roadbike is mostly aluminum.
Still riding your Trek 1100? Mine is still goin' strong!
moxfyre is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:07 PM.