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  1. #1
    Always Riding
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    Cutting a Carbon Fork- Which Tool?

    What tool should I use to cut a carbon fork? The whole thing is carbon, including the steerer. I'm assuming that using the wrong tool could really **** things up.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    diamond dust hacksaw blade or very very fine traditional hacksaw blade. cut about halfway through, rotate 1/4 turn, and finish the job. or at least thats how i do it. then lightly sand the exposed cut.

  3. #3
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    Be careful with the Park cutting guides. I found that they do not always fasten squarely, making your miter not square. If in any doubt, cut the tube long. You can always trim more.

    CF steerers dull even fine steel saw blades quickly. Plan on using two or three, unless you use the diamond blades.

  4. #4
    cab horn
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    Cut 2 inches or above where you really needed to make sure your tools are good before doing the actual cut, and like CHenry said cut more than you need (replacing headsets may mean new fork if you cut it exactly without slack).
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  5. #5
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Tape around the tube before cutting to help make a cleaner edge.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  6. #6
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    I've used the Performance cutting guide (a lower-cost Park knockoff) very successfully on both steel and carbon steerers. Use a good quality 32 tpi hacksaw blade and cut with very light pressure. One good quality tool steel hacksaw blade will make several clean cuts as neither steel or carbon are that abrasive. A diamond blade will obviously work but is not at all necessary.

  7. #7
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    I had the same question so i went to a few of the manufacturers websites to find out how to cut carbon. They all said the same, cover the area you are going to cut with tape, this stops splinters and resin being pulled off and weakening the area. cut with fine tooth hack saw. Then take tape off and file down till smooth. Do it slow and steady. all the best

  8. #8
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    As others have suggested, wrap a couple of layers of masking tape around the area to be cut. Also, I found a small metal hose clamp from Home Depot makes a very good cutting guide and it's dirt cheap. I've used a 32t hacksaw blade but the best is a grit edge blade like

    http://www.golfsmith.com/products/8587

    which gives a very clean cut and doesn't have teeth to tear at the fibers.

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